Occupational Therapy (OT)

OT 101. Foundations of Occupational Therapy.2 Credits.

This course provides students with the foundations of occupational therapy practice including its philosophical and historical origins, as well as its core beliefs and principles. The course also presents the various occupational therapy practice settings - both traditional and emerging - and highlights how the foundations of OT practice are threaded across settings.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 201. Occupation, Health, Participation.2 Credits.

This course introduces the concept of occupation as central to the practice of occupational therapy. Emphasis is on the relationship between occupation and health. Using methods of inquiry, students gain a deeper understanding of occupational performance and its determinants from a person-centered to a population- and institution-centered perspective. Theoretical models focused on occupations are explored and applied to assessing and enhancing occupational performance.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 214. Professionalism in Occupational Therapy.2 Credits.

This preparatory course serves as a bridge from students' general education to the professional phase of the OT curriculum. Students explore two main features of contemporary occupational therapy practice - client-centeredness and evidence-based practice, as foundations to professionalism - as they integrate essential learning proficiencies in written and oral interpersonal communication, diversity awareness/cultural sensitivity, information literacy and critical thinking in the context of occupational therapy practice. Finally, the course helps students to internalize the values of professionalism and professional development as keys to being an effective change agent.

OT 250. Occupational Therapy Framework and Activity Analysis.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the domain and processes of occupational therapy. Emphasis is on the following processes: occupational profile and analysis of occupational performance; activity analysis; intervention planning; collaboration between practitioner and client; and collaboration within an interprofessional team. Students learn terminology associated with the occupational therapy domain and process and apply that knowledge to case analysis, self-analysis, video analysis and standardized patients/clients.

Offered: Every year, Spring and Summer

OT 314. Therapeutic Relationships and Use of Self.2 Credits.

This course builds upon students' understanding of intentional relationships, therapeutic use of self, and the OT process to develop leadership skills in the context of a therapeutic encounter. Concurrently, this course provides students with the foundation for the application of the group process as a means of intervention. The course involves didactic lectures and practical training on professional leadership skills for both dyadic as well as group relationships.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 322. Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology I.3 Credits.

This course is a comprehensive, two-part series designed to provide students with foundational expertise in human biomechanics. Students examine the musculoskeletal system in conjunction with principles of kinetics and kinematics as the basis of practice in physical rehabilitation. The course includes a corequisite laboratory to develop competency in basic biomechanical safety and assessment (goniometry and manual muscle testing). The series culminates by merging all aspects of human movement as the basis for engaging in everyday occupational activities.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 211 BIO 212 PHY 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 322L. Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab I.1 Credit.

This lab, which accompanies OT 322, provides the opportunity to learn in the Human Anatomy Lab, Clinical Skills Lab, Rehabilitation Science Lab and the Model Apartment as students develop proficiency with basic biomechanical safety and assessment (goniometry and manual muscle testing). This variety of laboratory settings serves to enhance content delivered in the classroom; students are guided to first visualize human anatomy via donor dissection and then apply that learning in the simulated clinical settings. Students are alternately scheduled among spaces weekly and in accordance with progression of region in the human body. (2 lab hrs.)

Prerequisites: Take BIO 211 BIO 212 PHY 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 323. Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology II.3 Credits.

This course is part two of a comprehensive series designed to provide students with foundational expertise in human biomechanics. Students continue their examination of the musculoskeletal system in conjunction with principles of kinetics and kinematics as the basis of practice in physical rehabilitation. The series culminates by merging all aspects of human movement as the basis for engaging in everyday occupational activities.

Prerequisites: Take OT 322.
Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 323L. Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab II.1 Credit.

This lab, which accompanies OT 323, provides an opportunity to learn in the Human Anatomy Lab, Clinical Skills Lab, Rehabilitation Science Lab and the Model Apartment as students develop proficiency with basic biomechanical safety and assessment (goniometry and manual muscle testing). This variety of laboratory settings enhances content delivered in the classroom. Students are guided to first visualize human anatomy via donor dissection and then apply that learning in the simulated clinical settings. Students are alternately scheduled among spaces weekly and in accordance with progression of region in the human body. (2 lab hrs.)

Prerequisites: Take OT 322L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 325. Principles Human Development and Occupation.3 Credits.

This course explores normal development and its impact on age appropriate occupations. The age span is from conception through early adulthood. The course provides a foundation for evaluation and intervention in human occupation.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 326. Principles of Human Development/Older Adults.3 Credits.

This course builds on the developmental concepts from OT 325 to explore normal development and its impact on age appropriate occupations. The age span is from early to late adulthood. The course provides a foundation for evaluation and intervention in human occupation as well as a foundation in performance patterns, skills and context.

Prerequisites: Take OT 325.
Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 333. Functional Neuroscience I.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive study of neuroanatomy including the structures, functions and physiology of neural systems that are key to normal human health and function. The course provides a strong foundation for future study on neural substrates of health conditions and occupational performance. The course also introduces basic screening procedures to identify neurobehavioral dysfunctions.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 333L. Functional Neuroscience I Lab.1 Credit.

This course supplements OT 333 Functional Neuroscience I lecture and provides a comprehensive study of neuroanatomy including the structures, functions and physiology of neural systems that are key to normal human health and function. The course also introduces basic screening procedures to identify neurobehavioral dysfunctions.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 334. Functional Neuroscience II.2 Credits.

This course builds on functional neuroanatomy as it examines the interrelationships of neuroanatomical structures, subsystems and neurophysiologic processes involved in human behaviors, which are the foundation for occupational performance. Specifically, students learn the neural substrates and mechanisms of motor behaviors, sensory-perception, language, attention, memory and learning. The course continues to introduce basic screening procedures to identify neurobehavioral dysfunctions.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 335. Functional Neuroanatomy.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive study of neuroanatomy including the structures, functions and physiology of neural systems key to normal human health and function. The course provides a strong foundation for future study on neural substrates of health conditions and occupational performance.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 336. Functional Neurobehavior.3 Credits.

This course builds on functional neuroanatomy as it examines the interrelationships of neuroanatomical structures, subsystems and neurophysiologic processes involved in human behaviors, which are the foundation for occupational performance. Specifically, students learn the neural substrates and mechanisms of motor behaviors, sensory-perception, emotions, language, attention, memory and learning. The course also introduces basic screening procedures to identify neurobehavioral dysfunctions.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 345. Theory, Occupation and Wellness.3 Credits.

This course highlights topics about health promotion and illness prevention for the theoretical application to occupational therapy practice. Foundational concepts from public health, behavioral and social science literature, and practice-based models help students to appreciate the role of occupational therapy in health and well-being.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 345S. Theory, Occupation and Wellness Seminar.1 Credit.

This integrative course highlights content from the OT 345 (lecture) and Service Learning lab experience (OT 355L). Using the Socratic teaching method, students actively discuss the role of occupational therapy in community practice, integrating learned content and professional experiences.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 350. Theoretical Models and Service Learning.2 Credits.

This course highlights occupational therapy models and theory development as the foundation for occupational participation and the promotion of health and well-being among clients and populations. Students directly participate in a community-based service-learning context to enhance experiential learning and the application of theoretical concepts to practice.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 355. The Occupational Therapy Framework.2 Credits.

This course focuses on the definitions, applications and synthesis of the terms occupation, activity and purposeful activity. The dimensions of occupation as they apply to work, self-care, care of others, leisure and education are explored through theory, simulation and real life. The Occupational Therapy Framework document is analyzed and applied to case studies and videotapes. Class discussions reflect on service learning and its relationship to occupation.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 355L. OT Community Experience Lab.1 Credit.

The OT Framework course has a 2 to 3 hour-per-week community experience component during which the student is able to observe and, as appropriate, apply the concepts of occupation and purposeful activity in a community-based service setting. The community experience is supervised by faculty with expertise in the analysis of community-based practice and the focus of learning activities for students to be engaged as active learners.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 356F. Documenting OT Practice Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This course provides structured fieldwork observation in various settings and allows the student to observe and explore the documentation process utilized in occupational therapy. Students also have the opportunity to read documentation, compare documentation to observations, and record data and anecdotal information, utilized within the various models such as health care, education, community and social systems. The settings utilized are equipped to provide clinical application of principles learned in the OT curriculum. Students have the opportunity to reflect on this experience within the lecture course and seminar component of this course. Fieldwork is two hours every other week with a seminar on alternate weeks.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 361. Group Dynamics.2 Credits.

This course builds upon students' understanding of intentional relationships and therapeutic use of self, and the OT process to develop group leadership skills in the context of a therapeutic encounter. Concurrently, this course provides students with the foundation for the application of the group process as a means of intervention. The course involves didactic lectures and practical training on group leadership skills.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 362. Documenting Occupational Therapy Practice.1 Credit.

This course provides an introduction to the philosophy, concepts and clinical reasoning that supports the documentation of occupational therapy practice. The course integrates ethical, legal and pragmatic considerations of documentation throughout the occupational therapy process in major practice settings. There is a simultaneous Level I Fieldwork/Seminar course that introduces students to requisite psychomotor and cognitive skills in documentation including reviewing client records, developing subjective and objective impressions from observations, and recording of data and anecdotal information.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 399. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Offered: As needed

OT 411. Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy I.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of OT's role for children and youth with mental health and psychosocial needs. Emphasis is on the role of occupation in promoting mental health, preventing disease and managing life disruptions. Psychological and OT theories guide the student's learning of the OT process within community-based and institutional settings across the continuum of service delivery. The inclusion of documentation, therapeutic use of self and evidence-based practice are emphasized.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 411L. Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy I Lab.1 Credit.

This lab course complements OT 411 Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy for Children and Youth. Students are provided with the opportunity to practice the application of evaluation and intervention process for various mental health conditions across the continuum of service delivery settings. Group theory and group interventions are highlighted. Related skills such as documentation, therapeutic use of self and therapeutic relationships are emphasized throughout this course.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 412. Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy II.3 Credits.

This integrative course provides a comprehensive overview of OT's role for adults with mental health and psychosocial needs. Emphasis is on the role of occupation in promoting mental health, preventing disease and managing life disruptions. Psychological and OT theories as well as group theory and group interventions are highlighted. Related skills such as documentation, therapeutic use of self and evidence-based practice are emphasized. A culminating group protocol demonstrates the student's clinical reasoning, application of theory and integration of best practice.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 412L. Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy Lab II.1 Credit.

This lab course complements OT 412 Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy for Adults and Older Adults. Students are given the opportunity to practice the application of evaluation and intervention process for various mental health conditions across the continuum of service delivery settings. Group theory and group interventions are highlighted. Related skills such as documentation, therapeutic use of self and therapeutic relationships are emphasized throughout this course.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 431. Barriers to Health, Occupation and Participation in Children and Youth Populations.4 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive study of pediatric health conditions as they alter body structures and functions and impact activity and participation. Environmental factors and related facilitators and barriers to occupational performance are incorporated. This course also provides a clinical/professional reasoning model for structured case review and clinical decision-making and problem-solving.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 432. Barriers to Health, Occupation and Participation in Adults/Older Adults.4 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive study of various conditions that impact health and occupational performance among adults and older adult populations. Emphasis is given to understanding common diagnoses encountered by occupational therapists. This course also provides a clinical/professional reasoning model for structured case review with clinical decision-making and problem-solving.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 451. Occupational Therapy Process in Children and Youth.6 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the evaluation and intervention planning processes used in OT for children and youth. It covers specific procedures and tools for assessment, and strategies for intervention, which consider a variety of cultural and environmental factors. The emphasis is placed on theoretical underpinnings; the family and structural systems where children live, learn and play; clinical/professional reasoning; and documentation of the OT process in a variety of pediatric practice contexts.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 451F. Occupational Therapy Process in Children and Youth Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This course provides structured fieldwork observation in various settings working with the children and youth population; it allows the student to observe and explore the evaluation and treatment process utilized in occupational therapy. Students develop an appreciation for the frame of reference used in the models of practice as a guide to evaluation and treatment.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 451L. Occupational Therapy Process in Children and Youth Lab.1 Credit.

This course accompanies OT 451 OT Process Children & Youth Lecture & OT 451F OT Process Children and Youth Level I fieldwork. It provides a comprehensive overview of the evaluation process and intervention planning utilized in pediatric occupational therapy. This includes specific assessment tools and intervention strategies, which consider a variety of cultural and environmental factors.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 452. Occupational Therapy Process in Adults and Older Adults.6 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the evaluation process and intervention techniques used in occupational therapy for adults and older adults. While opportunities are provided to learn specific assessment tools and intervention techniques, emphasis is placed on the professional and clinical reasoning process and reflected on proper documentation of the processes. Application of theory, frames of reference, evidence and appreciation for diversity and systems are highlighted.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 452F. Occupational Therapy Process in Adult and Older Adult Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This course provides structured fieldwork observation in various settings working with the adult population; it allows students to observe and explore the evaluation and treatment process utilized in occupational therapy with adults and older adults. Students develop an appreciation for the frame of reference used in the models of practice as a guide to evaluation and treatment.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 452L. Occupational Therapy Process in Adults and Older Adults Lab.1 Credit.

This course complements OT 452 and OT 452F and provides an opportunity for experiential learning of the evaluation process and intervention techniques used in occupational therapy for adults and older adults. The safe, efficient and culturally sensitive delivery of specific assessment and intervention techniques are highlighted.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 499. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Offered: As needed