Mechanical Engineering (MER)

MER 210. Fundamentals of Engineering Mechanics and Design.3 Credits.

This course and lab provide a foundation in the principles of statics and mechanics of materials. It introduces the engineering design process, which serves as a foundation for further engineering studies. Equilibrium principles are used to analyze forces on statically determinate rigid bodies and structures. Concepts of stress and strain are introduced under axial loading.

Corequisites: Take MA 241 or MA 152 and PHY 121;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 210L. Fundamentals of Engineering Mechanics and Design Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 210.

Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 220. Mechanics of Materials.3 Credits.

Students study the behavior of materials under normal, shear, torsional, bending and combined loads. Loading, geometry, functional environment and material properties of machine or structural parts are used to relate the forces applied to a body to resulting internal forces and deformations in order to evaluate performance. Practical applications involving the design of mechanical and structural elements under various loading and environmental conditions are emphasized.

Prerequisites: Take MER 210;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 220L. Mechanics of Materials Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 220.

Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 221. Dynamics.3 Credits.

Dynamics examines the motion of particles, systems of particles and rigid bodies under the influence of forces. It focuses on the use of Newton's Second Law, in three major, progressive blocks of instruction from scalar, then vector, treatments of rectilinear and curvilinear motion of single particles; through vector motion of systems of particles; to general three-dimensional motion of rigid bodies. The course also provides brief introductions to energy methods: work-energy and impulse-momentum. Students apply the laws of physics to analyze problems and obtain a solid understanding of the relationship between force and acceleration in a dynamic environment.

Prerequisites: Take MER 210;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 230. Engineering Materials.3 Credits.

This course explores the relationship between the microscopic structure and macroscopic properties of materials used in engineering applications. The origin of mechanical and physical properties is studied. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of the fundamental aspects of atomic and microstructural concepts for proper materials selection and enhancement of engineering properties. Materials studied are metals, ceramics, polymers and composites.

Prerequisites: Take MER 220 CHE 110;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 230L. Engineering Materials Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 230.

Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 250. Computer Aided Design.3 Credits.

Students explore the use of computer methods as an aid to solving engineering problems. Computer techniques are studied in a variety of engineering contexts. Topics include 3D solid modeling, engineering analysis, engineering computer programming and graphical presentation of information. Students learn to apply a variety of engineering-related programs or routines. Students write, document and use programs of their own in design scenarios. Considerable emphasis is placed on use of the computer as a tool in the engineering design process.

Prerequisites: Take MA142 or MA 152;
Corequisites: Take MA 229 or CSC 110;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 310. Thermal-Fluid Systems I.3 Credits.

This course focuses on fluid mechanics while introducing and integrating corresponding topics of thermodynamics. Properties of fluids and hydrostatics as well as conservation principles for mass, energy and linear momentum are covered. Principles are applied to incompressible flow in pipes, external flows, Bernoulli's equation, dimensional analysis, Navier-Stokes, boundary layer development, lift and drag. Laboratory exercises are incorporated into classroom work.

Prerequisites: Take MA 242 or 251 and PHY 121;
Corequisites: Take MA 365 or MA 265;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 320. Thermal-Fluid Systems II.3 Credits.

This course focuses on thermodynamics, while incorporating and building upon fluid mechanics topics covered in MER 310. It applies conservation principles for mass, energy and linear momentum as well as the second law of thermodynamics. Principles are applied to power generation systems, refrigeration cycles and total air conditioning. Thermodynamic principles also are applied to the automotive system to examine engine performance (Otto and Diesel cycles) and to high performance aircraft to examine the Brayton cycle. Laboratory exercises are incorporated into classroom work. This class includes completion of a comprehensive, out-of-class design and analysis project.

Prerequisites: Take CHE 110 MER 310;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 330. Introduction to Circuits.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to DC circuit analysis, DC circuit design and AC circuit analysis. The course also includes electrical engineering topics required to prepare students for the Fundamentals of Engineering examination as a part of professional licensure. Students learn the language, tools and problem-solving techniques used in basic electrical circuit analysis.

Prerequisites: Take MA 241 or MA 251;
Corequisites: Take PHY 122;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 330L. Circuits Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 330.

Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 340. Manufacturing/Machine Component Design.3 Credits.

This course introduces machine component design and manufacturing machines, relating fundamental engineering science to machine components. It covers load, stress and strain analyses and fatigue. The course progresses to the study of machine component design to include mechanical components such as linkages, fasteners, springs, bearings, gears and shafts. The course culminates in team-oriented design and manufacture of a mechanical engineering product using the techniques, tools, machines and equipment that were developed and taught throughout the course and its associated lab (MER 340L).

Prerequisites: Take MER 220 MER 221;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 340L. Manufacturing/Machine Component Design Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 340. Students gain a safe, hands-on experience with manufacturing machines and equipment. They work on mechanical manufacturing machines common in machine shop and production environments. The equipment includes: a mill, lathe, grinder, drill press and bandsaw.

Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 350. Mechanical Engineering Design.3 Credits.

This course introduces mechanical engineering design as an interactive decision-making process. An engineering design problem reinforces the design process instruction and culminates in a student competition. Students begin their major design experience project, applying the mechanical engineering design process to a real-world engineering problem addressing social, political, economic and technical issues. Students continue their project with MER 498.

Prerequisites: Take MER 250 MER 340;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 360. Heat Transfer.3 Credits.

The three modes of heat transfer--conduction, convection and radiation--are studied in detail, and these concepts are applied to analyze various engineering systems. The principles of conduction and convection are applied to the analysis and design of heat exchangers, and all three modes of heat transfer are applied together to study scenarios of multi-mode heat transfer.

Prerequisites: Take MER 320;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 387. Introduction to Applied Aerodynamics.3 Credits.

The fundamental laws of fluid mechanics are used to develop the characteristic forces and moments, generated by the flow about aerodynamic bodies. Lift, drag and aerodynamic moments are studied for airfoils (2D) and finite wings (3D) in the subsonic and flow regime. Aircraft performance and design parameters are developed in both the classroom and laboratory sessions. The laboratory sessions include low-speed wind tunnel testing.

Prerequisites: Take MER 221 MER 310;
Corequisites: Take MER 320
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 388. Helicopter Aeronautics.3 Credits.

This course examines the aerodynamics of helicopter flight in relation to hover, translating and partial power flight. Theory and experimental results are used to predict aircraft performance. The course analyzes the dynamic response of the rotor system and the performance aspects of the vehicle as a whole. This is followed by a design workshop, during which students complete the initial sizing of a helicopter to meet specific mission requirements. The course includes a laboratory examining rotor power and thrust utilizing a whirl stand apparatus, and one field trip to a commercial helicopter company.

Prerequisites: Take MER 210 MER 250 MER 310;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 400. Mechanical Measurement and Data Acquisition.3 Credits.

In this course, students learn how to perform computer-based measurements of various mechanical phenomena such as displacement, temperature, force, strain, torque, pressure, flow, vibration and acceleration. This is a hands-on course that starts with the basics of sensors and transducers, and walks the students through signal conditioning electronics, instrumentation, data acquisition and signal analysis. A significant portion of this course focuses on LabView, an industry-standard graphical programming language that is widely used for data acquisition and analysis.

Prerequisites: Take MER 330 CSC 110 CSC 110L;
Offered: As needed

MER 450. Environmentally Conscious Design and Manufacturing.3 Credits.

Students learn to identify, quantify and reduce environmental impacts caused by products. Impact reduction methods form the course's core subject matter. Such methods include: design for recycling, design for remanufacture, life cycle assessment, pollution prevention biomimetics and others. The course also provides an overview of motivational legislation from North America and Europe such as the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) and the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) directive. Through lecture, discussion, assignments, case studies and potentially a semester project, students achieve a critical understanding of the role environmental issues play in mechanical engineering.

Prerequisites: Take MER 340;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 460. Mechanical Measurement and Data Acquisition.3 Credits.

In this course, students learn how to perform computer-based measurements of various mechanical phenomena such as displacement, temperature, force, strain, torque, pressure, flow, vibration and acceleration. This is a hands-on course that starts with the basics of sensors and transducers, and walks the students through signal conditioning electronics, instrumentation, data acquisition and signal analysis. A significant portion of this course focuses on LabVIEW, an industry-standard graphical programming language that is widely used for data acquisition and analysis.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 110 CSC 110L MER 330 MER 330L;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 470. Dynamic Modeling and Control.3 Credits.

This course covers dynamic modeling and control of linear systems. It includes an overview of classical control theory as the foundation for control applications in mechanical, electrical and aeronautical systems. Mathematical models are developed for various physical systems, and represented in time-domain, Laplace domain and state-space. Control system analysis and design techniques are studied within the context of transient and steady-state response. Computer design exercises include dynamic modeling and control of various engineering systems. Laboratory exercises include hands-on implementation of sensors and actuators, experimental validation of simulated models, feedback design and control-system implementation.

Prerequisites: Take MER 221 MER 250 MER 330 and MA 265 or MA 365;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 470L. Dynamic Modeling and Controls Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 470.

Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 472. Energy Conversion Systems.3 Credits.

This course provides an overview and examines the historical evolution of both classical and state-of-the-art energy conversion technology. It includes advanced analysis of energy conversion hardware, air conditioning and refrigeration as well as fossil fuel combustion processes using concepts of energy. Major methods of direct energy conversion are covered, including thermoelectricity, photovoltaics, thermionics, magnetohydrodynamics, and fuel cells. The current state of national and world energy is presented, and alternatives including renewable energy and a hydrogen economy are explored with reference to economic, political, environmental and technological factors.

Prerequisites: Take MER 330;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 475. Mechatronics.3 Credits.

This course presents a comprehensive introduction to the field of mechatronics. Mechatronics is the crossroads in engineering where mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, computer science and controls engineering meet to create new and exciting real-world systems. Knowledge of mechanical and electrical components, controls theory and design are integrated to solve actual physical design applications.

Prerequisites: Take MER 470;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 475L. Mechatronics Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 475.

Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 481. Aircraft Performance/Static Stability.3 Credits.

The course applies the principles developed in applied aerodynamics to develop the equations of motion for a rigid aircraft in steady state level flight, maneuvering flight, and during takeoff and landing. These equations are analyzed to determine such performance characteristics as maximum range, endurance, turning rate, climb rate, etc. Piston-prop, turbo-prop and jet aircraft are considered. The equations of motion are then analyzed to develop static stability criteria and investigate steady state control characteristics.

Prerequisites: Take MER 330 MER 387;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 486. Vibration Engineering.3 Credits.

In this course, students develop a foundation in the analysis and design of free and forced single and multidegree-of-freedom systems. Applications include modeling, damping, resonance, force transmissibility, vibration absorbers, matrix formulation and modal analysis. Emphasis is placed on vibrations examples from several engineering fields. Out-of-class design problems provide students with the opportunity to apply principles taught in the classroom to realistic problems encountered by practicing engineers. In-class demonstrations supplement the theory development.

Prerequisites: Take MER 221;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 489. Advanced Study in Mechanical Engineering.3 Credits.

The student pursues advanced study of a topic in mechanical engineering on an individual or small-group basis, independent of a formal classroom setting. Similar to graduate level research, the scope of the selected project is tailored to the interests of the student, based on resources and in consultation with a faculty adviser. To develop research skills, the student is integral in all phases of project completion by defining objectives, studying fundamentals and background material, outlining the approach, conducting analysis and communicating results. Requires permission of the instructor.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

MER 490. Engineering Professional Experience.1 Credit.

Students gain experience by employing engineering skills in a professional setting under the guidance of practicing engineers. Students must obtain departmental approval and register prior to starting the experience. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of adviser.

Prerequisites: Take ENR 395;
Offered: Every year, All

MER 491. Biomedical Engineering.3 Credits.

In this introductory course to biomedical engineering, students analyze biomedical implantable devices and explore topics such as biocompatibility, biomechanical properties of biological tissue, device design, as well as factors that go into medical device development and testing. Hands-on labs are incorporated into the course to provide a more in-depth immersion into specific course topics.

Prerequisites: Take MER 220;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 492. Power Trains and Vehicle Dynamics.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction in ground vehicle theory with emphasis on analysis, testing and evaluation of automotive power trains and dynamic systems to understand the underlying principles affecting vehicle design. Clutches, transmissions (manual and automatic), differentials, wheels and tires, as well as braking, steering and suspension systems are studied in detail to include their effect on vehicular or other system performance. High-speed, tracked vehicle application of the above systems also is covered. Theory is verified with hands-on experience in the laboratory. Component design problems are interspersed throughout the course.

Prerequisites: Take MER 221 MER 320;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 498. ME Major Design Experience.3 Credits.

This course integrates math, science and engineering principles using a comprehensive engineering design project. Open-ended, client-based design problems emphasize a multidisciplinary approach to total system design. Design teams develop product specifications, generate alternatives, make practical engineering approximations, perform appropriate analysis to support technical feasibility, and make decisions leading to designs that meet stated requirements. System integration, computer-aided design, maintainability and fabrication techniques are addressed.

Prerequisites: Take MER 350;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 499. Senior Design Project II.3 Credits.

A two-semester, six credit capstone design experience for mechanical engineering students involving analysis and synthesis of unstructured problems in practical settings. Students work in teams to formulate issues, propose solutions, and communicate results in formal written and oral presentations.

Prerequisites: Take MER 340;
Offered: Every year, Spring