Legal Studies (LE)

LE 100. Special Topics.1 Credit.

Offered: As needed

LE 101. Introduction to the American Legal System.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the American system of law and legal structure, and gain an overview of several areas of law. Topics include basic legal concepts, the structure of the American court system, as well as legal theory and procedure.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Humanities

LE 115. Criminal Law.3 Credits.

This overview of the American system of criminal justice includes study of its various institutions, such as the criminal courts, police, prosecutors and defense attorneys, and jails and prisons. The Fourth Amendment (Search and Seizure) and the Fifth Amendment (Privilege Against Self-Incrimination) are studied. Also explored are schools of thought underlying criminal prosecution and correctional philosophy.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

LE 150. Introduction to Mock Trial.1 Credit.

This experiential learning course will introduce students to the legal skills associated with bringing a case to trial. Students will develop skills in trial advocacy through a progressive development of techniques related to the trial of a case using an established fact pattern throughout the semester. Skills in trial procedure, legal analysis, evidentiary argument, and oral advocacy will be developed throughout the course, which will culminate in the presentation of a trial based upon the established fact pattern.

Offered: Every year, Spring

LE 159. Legal Studies Elective.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

LE 160. Competitive Mock Trial.1 Credit.

This course is designed for students who intend to compete in mock trial competitions throughout the Fall semester. Students will develop and enhance skills related to trial procedure, legal analysis and oral advocacy through preparation for competition at mock trial tournaments during the fall semester through the preparation of direct and cross examinations, opening and closing arguments and the portrayal of witness roles. They will attend one or more mock trial tournaments during the fall semester in preparation for the American Mock Trial Association Regional Tournament in February. Students are permitted to repeat this course, for 3 credits total.

Offered: Every year, Fall

LE 175. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

LE 199. Independent Study.1-3 Credits.

LE 200. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take LE 101;
Offered: As needed

LE 211. Legal Reasoning, Research and Writing I.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to legal research, both in print and online sources, and provides a foundation in legal reasoning, writing and citation in the context of objective, predictive legal documents. Students learn how to move from a fact pattern, through researching and analyzing the controlling law, to presenting the student's legal analysis in the form of formal legal memoranda.

Prerequisites: Take LE 101;
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

LE 212. Legal Reasoning, Research and Writing II.3 Credits.

Building on the skills learned in LE 211, students in this course refine and further develop their analytical, research and writing skills and learn to present their findings in a wider variety of legal documents. Students also are introduced to persuasive legal writing and advocacy.

Prerequisites: Take LE 211 EN 102;
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

LE 224. Sports Law (SPS 224).3 Credits.

Students explore the legal concepts surrounding sports, including contracts, torts, crimes and Title IX. Legal issues involve all sports and level of athletics, include professional, amateur, student and fans.

Prerequisites: Take LE 101;
Offered: Every year, Spring

LE 225. Alternative Dispute Resolution.3 Credits.

Students explore the various methods of dispute resolution that are available in the private sector, as alternatives to traditional litigation. Students learn to distinguish the various forms of dispute resolution, determine who participates in each form, how they participate and the advantages and disadvantages of each. Students role play in the various methods to more fully understand the mechanisms of alternative dispute resolution.

Prerequisites: Take LE 101;
Offered: Every year, Fall

LE 250. Gender and the Law (WS 250).3 Credits.

This course focuses on legal issues regarding gender, including the differential treatment of women, men and transgender in the legal system, and contemporary responses to gender issues in society.

Prerequisites: Take LE 101 or WS 101;
Offered: Every Third Year, Fall

LE 259. Legal Studies Elective.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

LE 260. Trial Techniques.3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of all aspects of a criminal and civil trial, and prepares students for advanced oral advocacy.

Prerequisites: Take LE 101 EN 102;
Offered: As needed

LE 300. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits; From Subject LE;
Offered: As needed

LE 301. Civil Procedures I.3 Credits.

This course presents the first half of a comprehensive study of the procedures in civil litigation from the beginning of a conflict to its final resolution, from both a theoretical and a practical approach. Preparation of documents necessary to a civil action is covered. Note: LE 212 can be taken the prior semester or simultaneously with LE 301.

Prerequisites: Take LE 211;
Offered: Every year, Fall

LE 302. Civil Procedures II.3 Credits.

This course presents the second half of a comprehensive study of the procedures in civil litigation from the beginning of a conflict to its final resolution, from both a theoretical and a practical approach. Preparation of documents necessary to a civil action is covered.

Prerequisites: Take LE 301 LE 212;
Offered: Every year, Spring

LE 305. Civil Procedures.3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the procedure of civil litigation from the beginning of a conflict to its final resolution, from both a theoretical and practical approach. The course will cover the beginning of the litigation process, from when a client first contacts an attorney, through motions and pleadings, by following a torts case. Jurisdiction, torts, client interviewing, fact investigation, pleadings, motion practice, discovery and settlement will be covered. The role of the attorneys, paralegals and other non-lawyer professionals, will be discussed.

Prerequisites: Take LE 211;
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

LE 309. Advanced Legal Writing and Advocacy.3 Credits.

This course reviews and develops the writing, research and analytical skills introduced in LE 211 and 212. Students continue to analyze legal problems and prepare both objective and persuasive documents written in a form that adheres to the conventions of the legal profession. Students improve their ability to write clear prose, edit their own and others' work, and are introduced to persuasive legal writing and appellate advocacy.

Prerequisites: Take LE 212;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

LE 311. Administrative Agencies.3 Credits.

The workings of, and procedures involved in dealing with, government agencies are introduced. Skills involved in being an advocate are covered.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

LE 312. Family Law.3 Credits.

This course presents a study of how law relates to the family as a functioning entity, examination of family law practice, current issues in family law and equal protection, and preparation of documents for dissolution of marriage.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

LE 315. Wills, Probate and Estate Administration.3 Credits.

Legal concepts and statutes pertaining to wills and probate are examined, with special emphasis on preparation of forms necessary in administration of an estate.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

LE 317. International Law (PO 317).3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the nature and development of international law as part of the global political system. They explore sources of international law from treaties, custom, general principles, judicial decision and scholarly writing. Other topics include the connection between international and national law, dispute resolution using arbitration and national and international court cases, use of law to manage international conflict, negotiation, and legal issues concerning shared resources.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every year, Fall

LE 318. Human Rights Law and Global Justice.3 Credits.

What is a human right? How do particular political and historical contexts influence our understanding of rights and the construction of legal rules? How do we codify those rights in a meaningful way? And how do we determine what values we can label universal? This course seeks to create a dialogue and exchange of ideas on these questions by focusing on the legal statutes and cases that constitute human rights jurisprudence, and also on the human interest stories that inform and shape those rights. The course asks students to examine the underlying values that inform these rights from a cross-cultural context. Students engage with classmates and work with a local organization to gain a better understanding of what an abstract notion of "human rights" means to individuals.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

LE 319. International Law and the Individual.3 Credits.

This course considers the complex legal issues surrounding private interactions between individuals from different nations. Students explore the sources of law that may apply when a citizen of one country lives and works in another country or simply has dealings on a business or personal level with persons from other countries. Topics include immigration, customs, taxation, banking, family law, traveling, health care, voting and criminal justice.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

LE 320. Land Transfer and Closing Procedures.3 Credits.

This course presents background for the sources of real estate law; land and its elements, the nature of property, the concept of ownership, and land titles and interest in land; procedures for conveying interest in land recording statutes; and searching titles. Emphasis is given to the preparation, coordination and completion of real estate closings.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

LE 322. Health Care Law (HSC 322).3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the legal issues faced by health care providers and patients. Students explore various topics arising from the organization and financing of health care, provider liability, bioethics and public health. The course focuses on the way in which law impacts the delivery of health care in the United States.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE or Take LE 101 and HSC 220 or HSC 310;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

LE 328. Employment Law.3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the legal relationship between employer and employee and a basic understanding of employment-related law and its impact on the employer/employee relationship. Students study both federal and state laws applicable to the employer/employee relationship. Areas covered include the basis for the employer/employee relationship, pre-employment concerns, legal aspects of the employment relationship, diversity and discrimination issues, discrimination actions, termination of the employer-employee relationship, ethical issues in employment law, and current issues such as telecommuting.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

LE 329. European Union Law (PO 329 IB 329).3 Credits.

This course focuses on the European Union and its important relationship with the United States. It covers the origin and development of the European Union, the institutions of the EU and the law-making process in the EU. Certain specific legal regimes in the EU, including "the four freedoms," EU business and anti-trust law, and the EU's slow march toward a common security and foreign policy are discussed. The course includes a travel abroad option, spending spring break in Brussels, the primary seat of the EU regional "government." Day trips to the medieval city of Bruges, Belgium and to Aachen, Germany, where the emperors of the Holy Roman Empire were crowned, round out the experience.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every Third Year, Spring

LE 330. Law of Business Entities.3 Credits.

In this study of the different types of business entities, including corporations, partnerships and limited liability companies/partnerships, emphasis is given to researching and drafting documents involved in the formation, maintenance and dissolution of business entities.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

LE 340. American Constitutional Law (PO353).3 Credits.

The United States Constitution and how it has been interpreted by the Supreme Court are studied in this course. The class examines Supreme Court decisions with focus on analysis and legal reasoning.

Prerequisites: Take PO 131 or 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

LE 342. Comparative Constitutional Law (PO 342).3 Credits.

Students compare the legal structures and fundamental principles typically found in constitutions by studying the constitutions of several different countries. The course explores the structure of government; the distinction between legislative, executive and judicial authority; the incorporation of fundamental human rights; the relationship between church and state; free speech and the press, and social welfare rights. Participants analyze the distinction between constitutional law and domestic law and assess the role of various constitutional frameworks in a global society.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE or take PO 131 or PO 101;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

LE 345. Intellectual Property.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the different areas of intellectual property law, including patents, trademarks, trade secrets and copyright law. Intellectual property protects products created by writers, artists and inventors. Preparation of necessary documents is covered.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

LE 350. Federal Indian Law and Policy.3 Credits.

The relationship between the federal government and Native Americans and tribes is considered from a historical and practical perspective, along with current topics in Indian law. Practice applications before the two Connecticut tribal courts are covered as well.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every Third Year, Spring

LE 360. Mediation.3 Credits.

This course approaches mediation from the mediator's perspective. Students develop a sophisticated understanding of the legal and ethical aspects of mediation and learn to mediate disputes between parties in the context of civil, criminal and family disputes. Students also learn how to use mediation techniques to resolve disputes in non-legal settings. The course employs mediation exercises, role plays, simulations, self-critique and group discussions to demonstrate and evaluate effective communication skills, bargaining strategies, mediation styles and intervention techniques.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every year, Spring

LE 370. Negotiation.3 Credits.

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of the theory, strategy and practice of negotiation, both transactional and as a dispute resolution method. Students learn to negotiate to resolve problems and communicate effectively, within an ethical framework. The course uses negotiation strategy, exercises, role plays, group discussions and reflective writing to demonstrate and evaluate negotiation techniques and styles.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from subject LE;
Offered: Every year, Fall

LE 399. Independent Study.1-15 Credits.

LE 480. Legal Internship Seminar I.4 Credits.

Students are placed in a supervised legal internship in a law office, agency or other legal setting for 10 hours a week. During the weekly seminar, students discuss legal ethics and professional responsibility. They also complete a complex legal research and writing assignment incorporating principles from the core legal studies classes. Students discuss issues faced in a legal work environment. For majors only.

Prerequisites: Take LE 302;
Offered: Every year, Fall

LE 481. Legal Internship Seminar II.4 Credits.

Students continue in a supervised legal internship in a law office, agency or other legal setting for 10 hours a week. During the weekly seminar, students edit and revise their legal research and writing assignment. They discuss the issues faced in a legal work environment, focusing on their transition to a legal career. For majors only.

Prerequisites: Take LE 480;
Offered: Every year, Spring

LE 485. Legal Internship Seminar.3 Credits.

Students are placed in a supervised legal internship in a law office, government office, non-profit organization, or other legal setting for ten hours per week. During the weekly seminar students discuss legal ethics, professional responsibility, and career development. Students will also complete a legal memo on a complex topic incorporating principles from the core legal studies courses, as well as participate in a mock appellate oral argument. Students will also produce a journal focused on their guiding question in completion of the Capstone requirement. For majors and students minoring in Legal Studies only.

Prerequisites: Take LE 305;
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

LE 499. Independent Study in Legal Studies.1-4 Credits.