Journalism (JRN)

JRN 106. Multimedia Production Techniques (SPS 106).3 Credits.

Students learn the fundamentals of multimedia production, including the use of digital cameras and related equipment, to tell simple stories and the use of editing software to prepare them for distribution. Students learn the rudiments of video-camera use, composition and lighting, capturing audio, continuity, interviewing, voiceovers, music beds, graphics, and shooting and editing action. Students produce b-roll, features, interviews, location pieces and story packages pertaining to their concentrations or areas of interest.

Offered: Every year, All

JRN 199. Journalism Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

JRN 260. News Writing.3 Credits.

This course teaches the principles and practices of news writing for digital platforms and print. Journalists must acquire skills to identify a news story and its essential elements, gather information efficiently, place it in a meaningful context, and write concise and compelling accounts. The readings, discussions, exercises and assignments for this course are designed to help students acquire such skills and understand how to utilize them wisely.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 160 or COM 140.
Offered: Every year, All

JRN 263. Broadcast News Writing.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the fundamentals of writing for the broadcast media in a professional environment. Topics include writing for radio and television, as well as integrating sound and video into news stories. The course also provides a basic understanding of primary journalistic values such as accuracy and fairness as they apply to broadcast news.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 160 or COM 140.
Offered: Every year, All

JRN 275. News Reporting.3 Credits.

This course is focused on news reporting, and is designed to teach students how to gather, analyze and use information for journalistic stories. Students learn to identify and use digital databases and resources, conduct thought-provoking interviews and search and locate public documents in ethical and legal manners.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 160 or COM 140; and JRN 260 or JRN 263.
Offered: Every year, All

JRN 280. The Art of the Podcast (SPS 280).3 Credits.

This hands-on course explores creative audio storytelling via the podcast. Students learn how to research, write, record, edit and self-publish creative nonfiction and fictional stories that are both original, and emulate some of the most popular podcasts on the market. Special emphasis is placed on audio gathering techniques, storytelling techniques and interviewing for live and recorded shows.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 160 or COM 140.
Offered: As needed, Spring

JRN 285. Mobile Journalism: the Future of News.3 Credits.

News consumption on Smartphones and tablets has surpassed that of desktops and newspapers, making mobile devices key to the future of news. Students examine the impact of this trend on the future of journalism, learn about the technologies necessary to produce news on these devices, critique the user experience provided by various apps and mobile websites, and produce a news app of their own. They also learn how to cover news events using mobile technology, how to produce mobile news stories and how to work in a mobile newsroom.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 160 or COM 140.
Offered: As needed, Spring

JRN 291. Reporting for Television I.3 Credits.

Students learn the principles of producing television news packages, which they shoot and edit using HD non-linear equipment. All students cover news and sports primarily off campus. The focus is on writing, news judgment, content, interviewing, use of voice and doing stand-ups. Stories can air on the TV newscast that is broadcast live weekly.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 105 or JRN 106 or SPS 105 or SPS 106; and JRN 260.
Offered: Every year, All

JRN 299. Independent Study Journalism.1-6 Credits.

JRN 300. Special Topics in Journalism.3 Credits.

Students engage in a detailed examination of current issues in journalism in a format that may incorporate academic research, journalistic writing and multi-media presentations. Students should consult the School of Communications course bulletin for information about each semester's offerings.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 260 or JRN 263.
Offered: As needed, All

JRN 301. Special Topics.4 Credits.

Offered: As needed

JRN 311. Reporting for Television II.3 Credits.

In this course, students produce in-depth television stories. Pieces are longer to allow the student to explore issues in greater detail. Stories can air on the TV newscast that is broadcast live weekly.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 291.
Offered: As needed

JRN 315. The Art of Journalistic Interviewing.3 Credits.

Compelling stories don't just happen. They come from strong interviewing skills that tell stories people care about. Students learn how to ask questions that elicit pithy responses, emotion and expertise, using in-class and out-of-class exercises. Students also analyze and critique the interviewing styles used by professional journalists, as well as the work of their classmates.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 105 or JRN 106 or SPS 105 or SPS 106; and JRN 160 or COM 140.
Offered: As needed

JRN 325. Telling Global Stories.3 Credits.

Using multimedia to gather and present facts lets journalists expand the scope of their storytelling. Students in this course examine current international journalism trends and socioeconomic and political issues specific to a developing country, learn fact-gathering techniques, and travel to that country during spring break to put into practice what they have learned. After spring break, students work on an interdisciplinary multimedia project.

Offered: As needed, Spring

JRN 341. Sporting Culture Through Nonfiction.3 Credits.

It has often been said that sport is a microcosm of society, but many rhetoric scholars have begun to suggest that sport plays a role in constituting society and is "defined by a range of political practices, including allocations of resources, representations of identity, projections of nationalism and globalization, activism and change." This directed readings course examines American culture, as well as comparative values, through nonfictional accounts of sport.

Offered: As needed, Summer Online

JRN 343. Literary Journalism in the '60s.3 Credits.

The 1960s stand out as an era of change and turbulence in 20th-century America. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, these nonfiction writers and journalists wrote in a personal style that became known as "Literary Journalism," or "The New Journalism." This directed reading course requires students to analyze the historical and contemporary views of major literary journalists.

Offered: As needed, Summer Online

JRN 360. Watchdog Reporting.3 Credits.

In this course, students learn and practice watchdog journalism, helping to inform our communities and keeping public figures and institutions in check. Students cover in-depth news off campus, on topics such as crime, public health, politics, education and the environment. In conversations with working journalists, students learn both innovative and proven strategies for reporting. Students also work individually and in teams to publish stories and multimedia projects based on public data, documents and interviews.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 260 or JRN 263 or JRN 275.
Offered: As needed, Spring

JRN 361. Sports Reporting (SPS 361).3 Credits.

This course introduces students to coverage of sports for the news media and includes writing game stories and sports profiles.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 260 or JRN 263.
Offered: Every year, All

JRN 362. The Story of Football (SPS 362).3 Credits.

This course traces the historical trajectory of American football and the coaches, players and media portrayals that transformed the game from a 19th-century collegiate test of manliness to what it is today: a spectator sport of immense appeal whose popularity endures despite more than a century of concerns over the game's debilitating and sometimes lethal violence.

Offered: Every year, Fall

JRN 365. Effective Editing.3 Credits.

Students learn the basics of editing online text, magazines and newspapers, with an emphasis on copyediting, headline writing, composition and story packaging.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 260 JRN 275.
Offered: As needed

JRN 372. Entrepreneurial Media (The MIC Project).3 Credits.

This course addresses the fiscal and distribution challenges faced by journalists and media professionals and empowers student teams to construct sustainable business models. Students experiment with the latest technology, exchange ideas with some of the industry's most prominent thinkers and developers, and create content or products for viable media business ventures. Open to all School of Communications students.

Prerequisites: Take COM 140 or JRN 160.
Offered: Every year, Fall

JRN 380. Fundamentals of Digital Journalism.3 Credits.

This course covers the principles and practices associated with researching and producing stories for digital media. Students are required to produce stories that include textual, audio, video and interactive elements.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 105 or JRN 106 or SPS 105 or SPS 106; and JRN 260 or JRN 263 or JRN 275.
Offered: Every year, All

JRN 395. Broadcast Performance.3 Credits.

This course explores the variety of skills required to communicate effectively through broadcasting. Students learn and practice on-air presentation techniques for effective delivery and interpretation. The course focuses on voice, voice control and the phrasing interpretation of copy and body language. Study focuses on performance techniques, creativity, writing and analytical skills needed to communicate effectively. Open to broadcast and print students.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 105 or JRN 106 or SPS 105 or SPS 106; and JRN 263.
Offered: As needed

JRN 399. Journalism Independent Study.3 Credits.

JRN 400. Special Topics in Journalism.3 Credits.

Students should consult the School of Communications course bulletin for information regarding each semester's offerings.

Offered: As needed

JRN 450. Senior Seminar.3 Credits.

This seminar entails an in-depth examination of issues and research perspectives in journalism. Seminar titles vary each term and may include topics such as ethics in journalism, diversity in the newsroom, and international journalism practices. Students should consult the School of Communications course bulletin for information about each semester's offerings.

Offered: Every year, All

JRN 470. Narrative Journalism.3 Credits.

Students in this class learn to report and write long-form articles suitable for publication in online and print magazines. Over a series of major writing assignments, students apply their research and interviewing skills to produce exhaustively reported and elegantly written articles. Topics in the course include: lead writing, article structure, interviewing, the use of statistics and the application of narrative techniques to journalistic writing.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 260 and JRN 275; or JRN 160 and JRN 263; or JRN 275.
Offered: As needed

JRN 480. Advanced Digital Journalism.3 Credits.

Many newsrooms now combine multiple types of media to immerse readers and make complex stories more digestible. This course covers the reporting and production skills needed to build many of these new forms, including interactive graphics and maps, and advanced audio and video projects. Students also study past and present interactive journalism projects and meet with some of the professionals who designed them.

Prerequisites: JRN 305 or JRN 380.
Offered: As needed

JRN 495. Advanced Reporting.3 Credits.

This course stresses individual enterprise reporting, in which students plan, report, write and produce stories suitable for print or multimedia that demonstrate their command of skills acquired during the course of study. Emphasis is placed on the role of the professional journalist as an ethical practitioner who represents and reflects the wider public in its economic, ethnic and racial diversity.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 305 or JRN 380.
Offered: As needed

JRN 496. The QNN Newscast.3 Credits.

In this course students act as producers, news and sports reporters, writers, editors and anchors as they put on a live weekly newscast. Newscasts are recorded and critiqued for student portfolios.

Prerequisites: Take JRN 291.
Offered: Every year, All

JRN 498. Journalism Capstone.4 Credits.

In this capstone course for the journalism major, students work on long, in-depth pieces of journalism across platforms. The stories include numerical or statistical information, multiple interviews from a variety of diverse sources, and show the students' command of the techniques used to produce and present news in print, broadcast and digital environments. Senior status required.

Offered: Every year, All

JRN 499. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.