School of Education

North Haven Campus

Main Office:  203-582-3354

Administrative Officers

Title Name Phone Email
Dean Anne Dichele 203-582-3463 Anne.Dichele@qu.edu
Associate Dean Beth Larkins-Strathy 203-582-3510 Beth.Larkins-Strathy@qu.edu
Director, Master of Arts in Teaching Christina Pavlak 203-582-3192 Christina.pavlak@qu.edu
Director, Educational Leadership Gail Gilmore 203-582-3289 Gail.Gilmore@qu.edu
Director, Instructional Design Ruth Schwartz 203-582-8419 Ruth.Schwartz@qu.edu
Director, Special Education Judith Falaro 203-582-8868 Judith.Falaro@qu.edu

Mission Statement

The mission of the School of Education is to lead our graduates to acquire the knowledge, skills and dispositions to serve successfully in their role as educator and school leader. The school defines the concept of educator as three-dimensional in nature, and believes that successful educators are teachers, learners and leaders. Graduates of the School of Education are expected to be teachers who establish conditions for all students to learn, learners who continue to learn as they continue their professional careers, and leaders who influence the culture of their schools in ways that support best practices in teaching and learning. Inherent in our mission is a commitment to graduate educators who recognize the potential of schooling to promote social change required for social justice.

Education (ED)

ED 140. Introduction to Public Education and the Teaching Profession.1 Credit.

This course is open to all freshmen and sophomores who are interested in public education in the United States. The course is required for students who plan to enroll in the five-year Dual-Degree MAT program, as it provides basic knowledge of public education and the teaching profession including current functions, trends and future expectations. The course also addresses issues related to the teaching profession including licensure, interstate certification, dual and cross-endorsements and teacher and pupil demographics across the U.S. Finally, the course provides opportunities for applicants to practice and refine writing skills essential for success in the Dual-Degree MAT program. Course is graded pass/fail.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

ED 220. Introduction to Education Studies.3 Credits.

This course, which is designed for students pursuing an Interdisciplinary Studies major in the College of Arts and Sciences with a concentration in Education Studies, explores a multidisciplinary understanding of global and American Education. Students consider the role of education in creating a more equitable society by analyzing the policies and philosophies that have shaped and are shaping schooling in the U.S. and throughout the world. Historical changes in education, critical analyses of policy debates in current education, the effects of legal policies in the classroom, the influences of cultural shifts and contemporary issues are all considered. Students also are introduced to basic concepts and terminology in the educational discipline, and develop a critical lens for evaluating educational resources, texts and data. Students are not allowed to receive credit for more than one of the following courses: ED 220 and ED 260.

Prerequisites: Take ED 140.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 250. Diversity, Dispositions and Multiculturalism.3 Credits.

This course examines the social, economic and political organization of public education in the United States, with a particular emphasis on the implications for historically marginalized populations. This course is required for all Dual-Degree MAT students. The course explores diversity and multiculturalism on the individual as well as institutional level, with a focus on concepts such as privilege, discrimination, racism and social transformation.

Prerequisites: Take EN 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Social Sciences, Intercultural Understand

ED 260. Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the social and philosophical principles that underlie the education system in the United States. This course is required for all Dual-Degree MAT students. Education is defined in the broad sense to refer to not only what happens in schools and universities, but also in the family, when people interact with media, with their social groups and so forth. The course examines a wide range of philosophical questions related to education and schooling in the U.S., including: What is the purpose of schooling? What does it mean to be educated? And what role should educational institutions play in our lives? Students are not allowed to receive credit for more than one of the following courses: ED 220 and ED 260.

Prerequisites: Take EN 101 or EN 103H.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Humanities

ED 270. Comparative Education Practicum.3 Credits.

This course provides students with a historical perspective of a country to which they plan to travel and study. The emphasis of this study is on the country's past and present education system in order to prepare students for the experiences they can expect while working and studying in the country. The course promotes familiarity of the native language of the country, and facilitates a social and academic support community for students who participate in this study abroad experience. Prerequisite is waived for students enrolled in the MAT program.

Prerequisites: Take ED 140 or enrollment in the MAT program.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 341. Learning and Teaching the Developing Child.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of cognitive, social and emotional development of school-age children (ages 4-18) and how the pedagogy of learning and teaching is designed to enhance and support this development. Major topics of inquiry include brain-based learning research, motivation, engagement of learners, lesson planning and curriculum development. Enrollment in the Dual-Degree MAT program is required.

Prerequisites: Take ED 140 ED 250 and ED 260 or ED 220.
Corequisites: Take ED 341L.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 341L. Learning and Teaching: Pedagogy Field Lab I.1 Credit.

The Pedagogy Field Lab is taken in conjunction with ED 341. Teacher candidates complete a minimum of 20 hours of classroom observation and fieldwork that coincides with topics studied in ED 341. Weekly field hours, case study analyses, observation analyses and reflective journals provide opportunities to enhance the translation of theory to practice.

Corequisites: Take ED 341.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 342. Advanced Learning and Teaching.3 Credits.

This course focuses on advanced concepts and skills related to teaching and learning. Topics include elementary-level learners, assessment strategies and assessment-driven instructional practices, error analyses and data-driven decision making, work sampling, testing and measurement, differentiation of instructional practices, standards-based practices and research-based instruction.

Prerequisites: Take ED 341-341L.
Corequisites: Take ED 342L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 342L. Advanced Learning and Teaching: Assessment Field Lab II.1 Credit.

The Assessment Field Lab is taken in conjunction with ED 342. It provides practical applications of advanced concepts. Teacher candidates complete a minimum of 20 hours of classroom fieldwork that coincides with topics studied in ED 342. Weekly field hours, data team discussions, analyses of research-based practices, observation and case studies highlighting differentiated instructional practices, as well as reviews of standards-based curriculum are considered.

Prerequisites: Take ED 341-341L.
Corequisites: Take ED 342.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 343. Advanced Learning and Teaching in Secondary Classrooms.3 Credits.

This course focuses on advanced concepts and skills related to teaching and learning. Topics include adolescent learners, assessment strategies and assessment-driven instructional practices, error analyses and data-driven decision making, work sampling, testing and measurement, differentiation of instructional practices, standards-based practices and research-based instruction.

Prerequisites: Take ED 341-341L.
Corequisites: Take ED 343L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 343L. Advanced Learning and Teaching: Secondary Assessment Field Lab II.1 Credit.

The assessment field lab is taken in conjunction with ED 343. It provides practical applications of advanced concepts for secondary educators. Teacher candidates complete a minimum of 20 hours of classroom fieldwork that coincides with topics studied in ED 343. Weekly field hours, data team discussions, analyses of research-based practices, observation and case studies highlighting differentiated instructional practices, as well as reviews of standards-based curriculum are considered.

Prerequisites: Take ED 341.
Corequisites: Take ED 343.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 380. Research Methods in Education Studies.3 Credits.

This course is required for students pursuing an Interdisciplinary Studies major in the College of Arts and Sciences with a concentration in Education Studies. The course is an upper-level UG education research course, intended to equip students with an understanding of the primary genres of educational research including action research, theoretical/conceptual research, case studies and ethnography. While quantitative inquiry also is addressed in the course, the focus is on qualitative research methods, given their important role and purpose in education. This course serves as an important preparatory course for ED 550, a graduate-level research course required of candidates who choose to pursue an MAT in Elementary or Secondary Education at Quinnipiac.

Prerequisites: Take IDS 200;
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 409. Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum.3 Credits.

This course develops the secondary teacher's understanding of reading and writing as essential skills across the disciplines. Students explore literacy strategies that enhance the comprehension and interpretation of the various disciplines. The focus is on how to integrate literacy skills into content-based curricular instruction.

Prerequisites: Take ED 343.
Corequisites: Take ED 409L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 409L. English Language Arts Field Lab III.1 Credit.

This language arts lab is taken in conjunction with ED 409. It provides opportunities to observe and apply literacy skills to various disciplinary areas. Teacher candidates are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of fieldwork that coincides with topics discussed in ED 409, such as comprehension development, academic vocabulary instruction, nonfiction reading and writing development and research skills.

Prerequisites: Take ED 343.
Corequisites: Take ED 409.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 436. Teaching Literacy in the Primary Grades.3 Credits.

This course provides knowledge of diagnosis, assessment and instructional strategies for the development of early literacy in Grades K-3 and knowledge of the Common Core State Standards for early language arts instruction. Emphasis is on the development of teaching strategies necessary for the success of early readers and writers.

Prerequisites: Take ED 342.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 452L. Inclusive Classroom Secondary Field Lab IV.1 Credit.

This inclusive classroom field lab is taken in conjunction with SPED 552. It provides opportunities to observe and apply the pedagogy of an inclusive classroom through the secondary candidates' fieldwork. Candidates are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of fieldwork that coincides with the topics and understandings presented in SPED 552. For dual-degree secondary candidates only.

Corequisites: Take SPED 552.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 458. Teaching Science in the Primary Grades.3 Credits.

This course focuses the methods and materials of teaching elementary-level science. The course covers scientific concepts, scientific inquiry, active investigation methods and a deep understanding of the influence of the Next Generation Science Standards on contemporary science education.

Prerequisites: Take ED 342.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 462. Facilitating the Arts in the Elementary Classroom.3 Credits.

This course focuses on incorporating the arts into the elementary classroom, and the integration of the arts into other content areas. Teacher candidates explore a variety of media, materials and activities to promote an understanding of the relationship of the arts to teaching and learning.

Prerequisites: Take ED 341.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 466. Teaching Social Studies in the Primary Grades.2 Credits.

This course provides elementary teacher candidates with the information, strategies and knowledge of the pedagogy of teaching social studies. The course focuses on the integration of the social studies curriculum with other disciplines to create a multidisciplinary understanding of history, economics, civics and society.

Prerequisites: Take ED 342.
Corequisites: Take ED 466L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 466L. English Language Arts Integration Field Lab IV.1 Credit.

This language arts field lab is taken in conjunction with ED 466 and ED 436. It provides opportunities to observe and apply literacy skills while teaching social studies content. Participants are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of fieldwork that coincides with topics discussed in ED 466 and ED 436, such as comprehension development, academic vocabulary instruction, nonfiction reading and writing development and research skills.

Prerequisites: Take ED 342.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 468. Teaching Mathematics in the Primary Grades.3 Credits.

This course introduces teacher candidates to the instructional methods and curricular materials used to enhance the instruction of mathematics in the primary grades and knowledge of the Common Core State Standards for primary-level mathematics instruction. Pre-service teachers learn to develop lesson plans and assessment methods that positively affect the learning of mathematics in grades K-3. Candidates are required to apply this knowledge within their field placement to better understand the relationship of theory and practice in the instruction of mathematics in the lower elementary grades.

Prerequisites: Take ED 342.
Corequisites: Take ED 468L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 468L. Primary Math and Science STEM Field Lab III.1 Credit.

This STEM field lab is taken in conjunction with ED 468 and ED 458. It provides opportunities to observe and apply the integrated teaching of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) into the elementary-level curriculum. Teacher candidates are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of fieldwork that coincides with topics discussed in ED 468/ED 458.

Prerequisites: Take ED 342.
Corequisites: Take ED 468 ED 458.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 477. Teaching English Language Learners in the Mainstream Classroom.3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce the pre-service teacher candidate to knowledge and skills needed to provide effective instruction to E language learners in the mainstream 1-12 classroom. Topics of study include instructional methods across content areas, the influence of language and culture on learning, teaching and assessment, history and legislation related to English as a Second Language and bilingual education in the U.S., and second language acquisition.

Prerequisites: Take ED 343.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 499. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Offered: As needed

ED 500. Internship and Seminar I.1 Credit.

This course provides the first-semester intern with supervision of the internship placement, as well as a weekly seminar that focuses on developing skills of reflective practice, mindfulness and intentional teaching. Taken in conjunction with ED 576, Teacher Discourse in the Secondary Classroom, this course allows students to begin to acquire strategies for maintaining classroom environments that are conducive to learning. Admission to the MAT program is required.

Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 501. Internship and Seminar II.1 Credit.

This course provides the second-semester intern with supervision of the internship placement, as well as a weekly seminar that focuses on developing skills of reflective practice, mindfulness and intentional teaching.

Prerequisites: Take ED 500.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 502. Teaching Methods in Secondary Biology.3 Credits.

This course is designed for pre-service teachers who are planning to teach high school biology. It touches on numerous aspects of biology classrooms including: assessing students' prior conceptions, designing a curriculum, planning lessons, determining and adapting appropriate teaching methods, promoting the Next Generation Science Standards three-dimensional science teaching, scientific literacy, using technology in science teaching, and assessing students' learning.

Prerequisites: Take ED 573 or ED 409.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 502L. Science Laboratory Safety Course.1 Credit.

Science activities, laboratory investigations and demonstrations are essential for high-quality science instruction. These activities provide experiences for students to engage in science as a sense-making endeavor. Inherent in conducting science activities, however, is the potential for injury. This course is designed to improve the safety awareness and increase the knowledge of relevant safety regulations, practices and procedures that directly impact biology teachers. The emphasis throughout the course is on best practices.

Prerequisites: Take ED 573 or ED 409;
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 503. Advanced Teaching Methods in Secondary Science.3 Credits.

This course is designed for future science teachers prior to the onset of student teaching. The goal is to prepare students for success as a secondary science teacher. The focus is on junior high and high school science classrooms and identifying attributes of teaching and learning science that are critical to effective instruction. This course continually builds on knowledge of effective teaching strategies to plan for standards-based units of instruction. Students engage in authentic scientific investigations, design science learning experiences for students, write and implement unit plans, read and reflect. They also assemble a collection of science education resources supportive of science teaching. The course concludes with the creation of a research-based rationale for teaching science.

Prerequisites: Take ED 573 or ED 409;
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 504. Methods II: Teaching English.3 Credits.

This course explores pedagogical theories and their practical application to the teaching of English language arts on the secondary level. The course prepares the teacher candidate to use a variety of strategies in the classroom instruction of reading, writing and the critical examination of literature. The course emphasizes the Connecticut Common Core of Teaching, as well as national and state standards for the teaching of English.

Prerequisites: Take ED 573 or ED 409.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 505. Methods II: Teaching History/Social Studies.3 Credits.

This course provides the teacher candidate with a theoretical and practical foundation for the teaching of history/social studies. It examines the issues, practices and materials involved with the study of the discipline. The course emphasizes the Connecticut Common Core of Teaching, as well as national and state standards for the teaching of history/social studies, technology and the assessment of students.

Prerequisites: Take ED 573 or ED 409.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 506. Methods II: Teaching Mathematics.3 Credits.

This course prepares teacher candidates to teach mathematics on the secondary level. Central concepts, tools of inquiry, and the structure of the discipline are addressed through the development of instructional units and lesson plans. The course emphasizes the Connecticut Common Core of Teaching, as well as national and state standards for the teaching of mathematics, technology and the assessment of students.

Prerequisites: Take ED 573 or ED 409.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 507. Methods II: Teaching a World Language.3 Credits.

This course examines the current philosophies, objectives and methods of teaching a world language. Teacher candidates examine theories of second language acquisition and develop instructional units and lesson plans across the broad range of world language curriculum. The course emphasizes the Connecticut Common Core of Teaching, as well as national and state standards for the teaching of a world language, technology and the assessment of students.

Prerequisites: Take ED 573 or ED 409.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 509. Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum.3 Credits.

This course presents an overview of language arts development in the secondary grades with an emphasis on reading and writing across the curriculum. Teacher candidates explore literacy strategies to help all students learn and apply current theories of integrated learning, i.e., the reading-writing-thinking connection. Attention is given to the particular needs of students for whom English is a second language.

Prerequisites: Take ED 573.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 510. Adolescent Development.3 Credits.

The major theories of human development are studied in order to provide an understanding of the normative and exceptional development patterns of adolescents and pre-adolescents. The social, emotional, cognitive and physical changes of adolescence are addressed from the perspective of their implications for education.

Prerequisites: Take ED 500.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 512. Disciplinary Core Ideas, Scientific and Engineering Practices, and Crosscutting Concepts.2 Credits.

In this course, students explore teaching and learning of science, especially as they connect to the implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the new vision for K-12 Science Education. This vision is described in the underlying policy document from the National Academy of Sciences: A Framework for K-12 Science Education Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. Participants inquire into the relationship among equity and diversity in science education, key concepts of the NGSS, and how each contribute to the reimaging of science teaching.

Prerequisites: Master of Science in Teacher Leadership: take EDL 501; Course may be waived at the director's discretion. Master of Arts in Teaching: take ED 573 or ED 409.
Offered: Every year, Summer

ED 514. Internship I.1 Credit.

This course aims to support teacher candidates who are working as interns in secondary schools through discussion of the issues and challenges they experience. Students examine issues of leadership, ethics and social justice. The goal is to help teachers understand what it means to be a leader or change agent in schools in the current climate of educational reform.

Prerequisites: Take ED 409.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 515. Internship and Career Development Seminar.1 Credit.

This course provides clinical support for teacher candidates who are completing their final residency/internship semester. In addition, the course provides a series of seminars to support candidates in their transition to a career as a teacher. Finding and securing a teaching position is the primary focus of the seminars. Seminars prepare teacher candidates in areas such as Resume and Cover Letter Writing, Team Interviews, Mock Interviews, Interview Preparation, Certification and Licensure procedures.

Corequisites: Take ED 601.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 521. Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education.3 Credits.

This course is an inquiry into the institutional structures, social values and philosophical foundations of education. Teacher and student reflections focus on issues pertaining to the teaching-learning process, including freedom/authority/discipline; cultural diversity; multiplicity of learning modes; mind-body integration; community; alienation/violence; sexism/racism/elitism; and teacher/student roles. Admission to the MAT program is required.

Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 525. Diversity in the Classroom.3 Credits.

This course helps teacher candidates understand that teaching is a social enterprise laden with moral responsibility and that, as teachers, they must be willing to act as agents for social justice in their classrooms and in their schools. This course helps students acquire the dispositions, cultural knowledge and competencies to adapt their curriculum and instructional skills for culturally responsive classroom practice. Admission to the MAT program or permission of program director is required.

Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 535. Elementary Internship and Seminar I.1 Credit.

This course provides the first-semester intern with supervision of the internship placement, as well as a weekly seminar that focuses on developing skills of reflective practice, mindfulness and intentional teaching. Taken in conjunction with ED 525 Diversity in the Classroom, this course allows students to study first-hand the issues surrounding diversity and multiculturalism in actual practice through their observations, reflections and participation in school settings. Admission to the MAT program is required.

Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 544. Developing Literacy in the Primary Grades.3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide pre-service teachers with the knowledge of the Common Core State Standards in the language arts, and diagnostic assessment and instructional strategies for the development of early literacy. Emphasis is on the development of teaching strategies necessary for the success of early readers and writers.

Prerequisites: Take ED 571.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 545. Elementary Internship and Seminar II.1 Credit.

This course provides the second-semester intern with supervision of the internship placement, as well as a weekly seminar that focuses on developing skills of reflective practice, mindfulness and intentional teaching.

Prerequisites: Take ED 535.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 550. Issues and Research in Education.2 Credits.

This course introduces pre-service teachers to some of the primary genres of educational research: action-based qualitative, theoretical and quantitative. In addition, the course begins to help students understand what constitutes good educational research and to recognize the link between theory and practice. Finally, the course helps students develop the tools and mindset of a teacher-researcher to help them become truly reflective practitioners.

Prerequisites: Take ED 468L ED 409L ED 501 or ED 545.
Offered: Every year, Summer

ED 554. Internship and Seminar I.2 Credits.

This course aims to support teacher candidates who are working as interns in elementary schools through discussion of the issues and challenges they experience. Students examine issues of leadership, ethics and social justice. The goal is to help teachers understand what it means to be a leader or change agent in schools in the current climate of educational reform.

Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 555. Internship and Career Development Seminar.1 Credit.

This course provides clinical support for teacher candidates who are completing their final residency/internship semester. In addition, the course provides a series of seminars to support candidates in their transition to a career as a teacher. Finding and securing a teaching position is the primary focus of the seminars. Seminars prepare teacher candidates in areas such as Resume and cover Letter Writing, Team Interviews, Mock Interviews, Interview Preparation, Certification and Licensure procedures.

Corequisites: Take ED 601.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 556. Teaching Literacy in Grades 4-6.3 Credits.

This course provides teacher candidates with the knowledge of the Common Core State Standards in the language arts, and diagnostic assessment and instructional strategies for the development of literacy in grades 4-6. Emphasis is on the development of teaching strategies necessary for the success of readers and writers in grades 4-6.

Prerequisites: Take ED 436 or ED 544.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 558. Elementary School Science: Content and Pedagogy.3 Credits.

This course leads students to an understanding of science concepts and scientific inquiry at the elementary school level through active investigations with common phenomena and everyday materials. Topics include: inquiry-based science focused on national standards and integration with the Common Core State Standards; increased knowledge of resources for science learning; and management considerations in such areas as material preparation, groupings and safety.

Prerequisites: Take ED 571.
Offered: Every year, Summer

ED 562. Facilitating the Arts in the Elementary Classroom.2 Credits.

This course focuses on the development of the teacher-as-facilitator in incorporating the arts into the elementary classroom. An emphasis is placed on the relationship of the arts to teaching, learning and the integration of the arts into other content areas. Students explore a variety of media, movement, music and theatrical skills for selecting materials and activities appropriate to a child's age/stage of development. Attention also is given to the music and art of many peoples, with particular emphasis on developing a repertoire representative of different cultures and languages.

Prerequisites: Take ED 571.
Offered: Every year, Summer

ED 566. Elementary School Social Studies: Content and Pedagogy.2 Credits.

This course provides elementary teacher candidates with information, strategies and knowledge of the pedagogy of teaching social studies. The course incorporates other disciplines with Common Core State Standards and expands views of civic education. Students work collaboratively and independently to build understandings of the field of social studies and learn how to teach it creatively and effectively in a diverse community.

Prerequisites: Take ED 571.
Offered: Every year, Summer

ED 568. Teaching Mathematics in the Primary Grades.3 Credits.

This course introduces teacher candidates to the Common Core State Standards in mathematics and the instructional methods and curricular materials used to enhance the instruction of mathematics in the primary grades. Candidates learn to develop lesson plans and assessment methods that positively affect the learning of mathematics in grades K-3. Students are required to apply this knowledge within their field placement to better understand the relationship of theory and practice in the instruction of mathematics in the lower elementary grades.

Prerequisites: Take ED 535 or ED 571
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 569. Teaching Mathematics in Grades 4-6.3 Credits.

This course introduces pre-service teachers to the Common Core State Standards in mathematics and the instructional methods and curricular materials used to enhance the instruction of mathematics in grades 4-6. Teacher candidates learn to develop lesson plans and assessment methods that positively affect the learning of mathematics in grades 4-6. Candidates are required to apply this knowledge within their field placement to better understand the relationship of theory and practice in the instruction of mathematics in the upper elementary grades.

Prerequisites: Take ED 468 or ED 568.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 571. Learning and Teaching the Developing Child.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of cognitive, social and emotional development of school age children (Ages 4-18) and how the pedagogy of learning and teaching is designed to enhance and support this development. Major topics of inquiry include brain-based learning research, motivation, engagement of learners, lesson planning and curriculum development. This course is taken during the first internship semester and includes field-based assignments and analyses. Admission to the MAT program is required.

Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 572. Advanced Learning and Teaching.3 Credits.

This course focuses on advanced concepts and skills related to teaching and learning elementary-level learners, assessment strategies and assessment-driven instructional practices, error analyses and data-driven decision making, work sampling, testing and measurement, differentiation of instructional practices, standards-based practices and research-based instruction.

Prerequisites: Take ED 571.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 573. Advanced Teaching and Learning - Secondary.3 Credits.

This course focuses on advanced concepts and skills related to teaching and learning. Topics include adolescent learners, assessment strategies and assessment-driven instructional practices, error analyses and data-driven decision making, work sampling, testing and measurement, differentiation of instructional practices, standards-based practices and research-based instruction.

Prerequisites: Take ED 571.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 575. Teacher Discourse: Language and Communication Issues in the Elementary Classroom.3 Credits.

The course provides the teacher candidate with the knowledge and skills necessary to design classroom environments that enhance and support the social and emotional development of elementary-level learners. This course examines the communication systems of educational settings--in particular the communication systems of the classroom, the school/family dynamic and the individual developing child. The course analyzes and considers instructional language and its impact on the classroom community, student learning and student behavior. Candidates also focus on teacher communication with parent/guardian populations and its impact on student learning. Enrollment in the MAT program is required.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Summer

ED 576. Teacher Discourse in the Secondary Classroom.3 Credits.

The course provides the teacher candidate with the knowledge and skills necessary to design classroom environments that enhance and support the social and emotional development of adolescent learners. The course analyzes instructional language, the language of discipline and how teacher language influences the climate of contemporary classrooms. The impact of teacher discourse on the classroom community, student learning and student behavior are all considered. The major focus is on managing classroom behaviors and supporting and respecting adolescent learners to enhance academic achievement. Enrollment in the MAT program is required.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Summer

ED 577. Teaching English Language Learners in the Mainstream Classroom.3 Credits.

This course introduces the pre-service teacher candidate to the knowledge and skills that are needed to provide effective instruction to ELs in the mainstream 1-12 classroom. Topics of study include instructional methods across content areas, the influence of language and culture on learning, teaching, and assessment history and legislation related to ESL and bilingual education in the United States, and second language acquisition.

Prerequisites: Take ED 572 ED 573 or ED 436.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Summer

ED 599. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Offered: As needed

ED 601. Student Teaching.6 Credits.

This 10-week student teaching placement at the elementary, middle or secondary level allows students to demonstrate the skills, understandings and dispositions needed to assume full responsibility as a classroom teacher.

Prerequisites: Take ED 501 ED 514 ED 545 or ED 554.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 603. Student Teaching under a DSAP.6 Credits.

This course is designed for students who are teaching under a Durational Shortage Area Permit (DSAP) issued by the Connecticut State Department of Education. Students receive supervision and support from a university supervisor on a regular basis during the first semester of the academic year and as needed throughout the second semester. Prerequisite: Permission of the program director.

Offered: Every year, All

ED 614. Elementary Education Internship III.1 Credit.

This online course is designed for interns in the graduate, five-semester elementary education program. It aims to help teacher candidates develop the leadership skills needed to serve as agents of change in elementary schools. The course focuses on issues of leadership, ethics and social justice in the current climate of educational reform and increased levels of teacher accountability.

Prerequisites: Take ED 545.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 615. Internship and Career Development Seminar.1 Credit.

This course provides clinical support for teacher candidates who are completing their final residency/internship semester. In addition, the course provides a series of seminars to support candidates in their transition to a career as a teacher. Finding and securing a teaching position is the primary focus of the seminars. Seminars prepare teacher candidates in areas such as Resume and cover Letter Writing, Team Interviews, Mock Interviews, Interview Preparation, Certification and Licensure procedures.

Corequisites: Take ED 601.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 616. Secondary Education Internship III.1 Credit.

This online course is designed for interns in the graduate, five-semester secondary education program. It aims to help teacher candidates develop the leadership skills needed to serve as agents of change in secondary schools. The course focuses on issues of leadership, ethics and social justice in the current climate of educational reform and increased levels of teacher accountability.

Prerequisites: Take ED 501.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 617. Internship and Career Development Seminar.1 Credit.

This course provides clinical support for teacher candidates who are completing their final residency/internship semester. In addition, the course provides a series of seminars to support candidates in their transition to a career as a teacher. Finding and securing a teaching position is the primary focus of the seminars. Seminars prepare teacher candidates in areas such as Resume and cover Letter Writing, Team Interviews, Mock Interviews, Interview Preparation, Certification and Licensure procedures.

Corequisites: Take ED 601.
Offered: Every year, Spring

ED 693. Research I.2 Credits.

This course assists students in the development and design of a research study complete with methods of data collection and analysis.

Prerequisites: Take ED 550.
Offered: Every year, Fall

ED 694. Research II.2 Credits.

This course is intended as a culminating research course in which the work of the previous two semesters is brought to closure through the analysis of data and the writing of a research paper.

Prerequisites: Take ED 550 ED 693.
Offered: Every year, Spring

Educational Leadership (EDL)

EDL 501. Teacher Leadership to Transform School Culture.3 Credits.

This course investigates leadership concepts and principles and related research findings and practices with an emphasis on how leaders can transform school culture and develop the school as a community of learners. The course helps teacher-leaders understand leadership theory and behavior and how to promote positive school culture by building a sense of community, increasing the quality of collegial relationships and discourse, and establishing open and effective communications. Theoretical concepts of leadership are integrated along with practical applications for teacher-leaders.

EDL 503. Leading the Instructional Program to Improve Student Learning.6 Credits.

This course examines current curriculum designs and teaching/learning models and the leadership processes of assessing, developing, implementing and revising instructional programs to improve student learning. Case studies focus on how to improve achievement through analysis of curriculum development processes in schools, analysis of achievement data, professional development programming, student assessment systems and coaching teachers to improve instructional practices.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 501.

EDL 505. Research-based Literacy Practices.3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of research-based instructional and assessment strategies in reading and writing, stressing the link between research and practice to improve student learning. Primary genres of educational research in the field of literacy are examined including action-based, qualitative, theoretical and quantitative. The course helps teacher-leaders develop the tools and mindset of a teacher-researcher so that they may reflect on their own classroom practice.

EDL 509. Leading School Improvement.6 Credits.

This course analyzes the characteristics of effective schools and the leadership theories and concepts related to the change process. Participants examine the application of these theories and concepts to the practice of improving the work of the school and the achievement of students. Case studies focus on the analysis of schools in need of improvement, the specific issues facing the schools, data analysis techniques, effective leadership practices, strategic planning, financing improvement plans, and evaluation processes. The role of teacher-leaders within the school improvement process is emphasized.

EDL 511. Cycles of Inquiry within the Literacy Classroom.3 Credits.

This course helps teacher-leaders understand the cycles of inquiry-a systematic approach to teaching and learning that includes: knowing content standards, diagnosing student needs, setting and working toward long- and short-term learning goals, backward planning from standards and assessments, investing students in their goals, teaching effectively and continuously analyzing data to ensure learning goals are being met. This course provides teacher-leaders with training and experience through complete cycles of inquiry within the literacy classroom to further develop their skills as master teachers. Course assignments support each candidate as a reflective practitioner and build capacity for teacher-leaders to make a difference for every learner.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 501.

EDL 513. Coaching Teachers of Literacy.3 Credits.

This course provides students with training and experience in mentoring colleagues--novice or experienced teachers--through a complete coaching cycle. Students actively participate in a coaching cycle that is designed to provide teachers with support over a period of consecutive days as they develop their teaching practice. Students develop skills necessary to support teachers through modeling lessons, co-planning and co-teaching lessons, conducting classroom observations and providing feedback to those literacy teachers to foster reflection. Ultimately, students explore the best practices in mentoring teachers to improve the teaching of literacy and to develop a peer-to-peer coaching network for inquiry, conversation, collaboration and support.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 501.

EDL 515. Action Research in Literacy Leadership.3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the concepts and principles of conducting action research in an educational setting. Action research conducted in the field of literacy is reviewed and analyzed for purpose, methodology and outcomes. As a capstone experience, candidates design and implement action research in their school that involves working closely with peers on a project that is intended to improve the literacy skills of students.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 505 EDL 513.

EDL 517. Cycles of Inquiry within the Mathematics Classroom.3 Credits.

This course helps teacher-leaders understand the cycles of inquiry--a systematic approach to teaching and learning that includes: knowing content standards, diagnosing student needs, setting and working toward long- and short-term learning goals, backward planning from standards and assessments, investing students in their goals, teaching effectively and continuously analyzing data to ensure learning goals are being met. This course provides teacher-leaders with training and experience through complete cycles of inquiry within the mathematics classroom to further develop their skills as master teachers. Course assignments support each candidate as a reflective practitioner and build capacity for teacher-leaders to make a difference for every learner.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 501.

EDL 519. Coaching Teachers of Mathematics.3 Credits.

This course provides students with training and experience in mentoring colleagues-novice or experienced teachers-through a complete coaching cycle. Students actively participate in a coaching cycle that is designed to provide teachers with support over a period of consecutive days as they develop specific aspects of their teaching practice. Students develop the skills necessary to support those teachers through modeling lessons, co-planning and co-teaching lessons, conducting classroom observations and providing feedback to those mathematics teachers to foster reflective practitioners. Ultimately, students explore the best practices in mentoring teachers to improve the teaching of mathematics and to develop a peer-to-peer coaching network for inquiry, conversation, collaboration and support.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 501.

EDL 521. Action Research in Mathematics Leadership.3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the concepts and principles of conducting action research in an educational setting. Action research conducted in the field of mathematics is reviewed and analyzed for purpose, methodology and outcomes. As a capstone experience, candidates design and implement action research in their school that involves working closely with peers on a project that is intended to improve the mathematics skills of students.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 505 EDL 519.

EDL 523. Leading Organizational Learning.3 Credits.

This course examines the nature of effective professional learning in schools and how such learning contributes to sound classroom pedagogy, organizational renewal, reform efforts and gains in student achievement. The unique role of teacher-leaders in professional development is examined. Course topics include principles of successful professional development programming, organizational and social contexts that influence teacher learning, and the evaluation of professional development programs.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 501.

EDL 525. Diversity in the Classroom and School Community.3 Credits.

This course develops an understanding and commitment to the position that teaching is a social enterprise laden with moral responsibility, and that teacher leaders must be willing to act as agents for social justice in their classrooms and in their schools. This course helps teacher-leaders develop the dispositions, cultural knowledge and competencies to adapt curriculum and instructional skills for culturally responsive classroom practices and to advocate for social justice at the school level.

EDL 527. Financing Program Improvement Initiatives.3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to preparing and writing grant proposals for funding program improvement projects in schools based on identified needs. It includes specific terminology related to the grant-writing process and how to identify eligibility requirements. The course focuses on how to develop the grant narrative, budget and other components necessary for a successful proposal.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 529.

EDL 529. Educational Program Evaluation.3 Credits.

This course presents an overview of the concepts and approaches in educational program planning and evaluation, with an emphasis on the responsibilities of school leaders to use program evaluation as a means to improve teaching and learning. The interpretation of data collected through the program evaluation process is emphasized so that decisions may be made to continue, restructure or terminate educational programs. Case studies focus on critiquing program evaluations and students are required to plan and conduct an assessment of an educational program in their school or district.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

EDL 530. Disciplinary Core Ideas, Scientific and Engineering Practices, and Crosscutting Concepts.2 Credits.

The National Research Council's Next Generation Science Standards provide a vision of what it means to be science literate; it rests on a view of science as both a body of knowledge and an evidence-based model and theory building enterprise that continually extends, refines and revises knowledge. The standards present science learning as three-dimensional: Disciplinary Core Ideas, Science and Engineering Practices, and Crosscutting Concepts. These three dimensions are the foundation of each NGSS Performance Expectation. Life Science has four overarching topics: 1) From molecules to organisms: structure and process; 2) Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics; 3) Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits; and 4) Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity. This course focuses on developing the pre-services teacher's understanding of each of the life science topics through the Science and Engineering Practices and Crosscutting Concepts.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 501; Course may be waived at the director's discretion.
Offered: Every year, Summer

EDL 531. Cycles of Inquiry within the Science Classroom.3 Credits.

This course helps teacher-leaders understand the cycles of inquiry in the data decision-making process. The cycle of inquiry is a systematic approach to teaching and learning that includes the following components: knowing content standards, diagnosing student needs, setting and working toward long- and short-term learning goals, backward planning from standards and assessments, investing students in their goals, teaching effectively, and continuously analyzing data to ensure learning goals are being met. This course provides training and experience through complete cycles of inquiry within the science classroom. As engaged members of the inquiry process, teacher-leaders participate in interconnected conversations to understand student progress and promote student-centered accountability. Course assignments and activities support each candidate as a reflective practitioner and build the capacity for teacher-leaders to make a difference for every learner.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 501.
Offered: Every year, Fall

EDL 532. Coaching Teachers of Science.3 Credits.

One of the most important roles of a teacher-leader is that of peer coach and mentor. This course provides students with training and experience in mentoring colleagues, novice or experienced teachers, through a complete coaching cycle. Students actively participate in a coaching cycle that is designed to provide teachers with support over a period of consecutive days as they develop specific aspects of their teaching practice. They develop the skills necessary to support those teachers through modeling lessons, co-planning and co-teaching lessons, conducting classroom observations, and providing feedback to those science teachers to foster teachers as reflective practitioners. Ultimately, students explore the best practices in mentoring teachers to improve the teaching of science and to develop a peer-to-peer coaching network for inquiry, conversation, collaboration and support.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 501.
Offered: Every year, Fall

EDL 533. Action Research in Science Leadership.3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the concepts and principles of conducting action research in educational settings. Action research conducted in the field of science is reviewed and analyzed for the purpose, methodology and outcomes. Candidates design and implement action research in their school that involves working closely with peers on a project that is intended to improve the science skills of students. Together with their colleagues, students begin a cycle of posing questions, gathering data and deciding on a course of action. As reflective practitioners, candidates continue to examine student achievement outcomes, instructional strategies and reciprocal teacher leadership. Ultimately, this form of collaborative action research allows for the empowerment of all participants, collaboration through participation, acquisition of knowledge, and educational change.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 505 EDL 532.
Offered: Every year, Spring

EDL 601. Leading and Managing the Contemporary School.6 Credits.

This course is an introduction to leadership and management theories and concepts and how school leaders apply them to address current problems and issues. Case studies focus on the development and analysis of school policies, practices and resources related to contemporary educational issues and the leadership and management styles required to implement them. The course includes a field-based experience involving the analysis of school and district policies, practices and resources related to a contemporary educational issue impacting teaching and learning.

Offered: Every year

EDL 603. Leading and Managing the Instructional Program.6 Credits.

This course examines current curriculum designs and teaching/learning models and the leadership processes of developing, implementing and supervising instructional programs to improve student learning. Case studies focus on how to improve achievement through analysis of curriculum development processes in schools, professional development programming, student assessment systems and analysis of achievement data, and instructional practices of teachers. Course includes a field-based experience involving classroom supervision of a specific instructional program across multiple grade levels.

Offered: Every year

EDL 605. Leading and Managing School Improvement.6 Credits.

This course analyzes the characteristics of effective schools and the leadership theories and concepts related to the change process. Emphasis is on application of these theories and concepts to the practice of improving school operations and student achievement. Case studies focus on analysis of schools in need of improvement, the specific issues facing the schools, data analysis techniques, effective leadership practices, strategic planning, financing improvement plans and evaluation processes. Course includes a field-based experience involving the analysis of the school as a professional learning community and the development of a school improvement plan to address identified needs.

Offered: Every year

EDL 607. Internship in Educational Leadership.3 Credits.

This field-based experience requires students to assume a leadership role and demonstrate application of the standards established by the Educational Leadership Constituent Council. The internship is planned, guided and evaluated cooperatively by the student, the University professor and the field site mentor, who is a licensed, practicing administrator. The course culminates in the development of an electronic portfolio, which represents the work during the internship. This course is graded pass/fail.

Prerequisites: Take EDL 601 EDL 603 EDL 605.
Offered: Every year

EDL 609. Educational Program Evaluation.3 Credits.

This course is an overview of the concepts and approaches in educational program planning and evaluation, with an emphasis on the responsibilities of school leaders to use program evaluation as a means to improve teaching and learning. The interpretation of data collected through the program evaluation process is emphasized so that decisions may be made to continue, restructure or terminate educational programs. Case studies focus on critiquing program evaluations and students are required to plan and conduct an assessment of an educational program in their school or district.

Offered: Every year

EDL 611. Educational Law.3 Credits.

This course is a survey of federal and state statutes, regulations, case law, executive agency options and published research with respect to the rights of students and personnel and the corollary responsibilities of school and state agency officials. Case studies focus on actual legal issues brought to the courts by students, parents, teachers, administrators and the public.

Offered: Every year

EDL 613. Public School Finance.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive, detailed overview of the resource allocation process from the development of planning guidelines to the reporting of the results of school financial operations. Theoretical and practical treatments of the budget process are examined, with a focus on the budget as a tool to accomplish school goals. Case studies focus on how schools can utilize the budgeting process and both competitive and entitlement grants to reallocate and manage resources to improve educational programs and student learning.

Offered: Every year

EDL 700. Connecticut Administrators Test.0 Credits.

Instructional Design (IDN)

IDN 525. Instructional Design for Digital Environments.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the instructional design process. Each phase of the process is investigated, including conducting a research-based problem analysis, analyzing the target audience, selecting delivery media and designing, implementing and evaluating an instructional resource. This course requires students to identify a local organization (e.g., school, community center, corporation), conduct a needs assessment in that setting to identify an instructional problem and, based on their findings, prepare a design proposal for an appropriate educational resource.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

IDN 526. Cognitive Science and Educational Design.3 Credits.

This course covers theoretical approaches to learning, discussion of learning processes, current research in mind and brain, and theories of multimedia learning. Focus is on the application of theory to guide design decisions. Readings include empirical studies as well as theoretical material to help students become comfortable with the task of reading, interpreting and applying empirical research. The final project for the course is a design document and proof of concept for an instructional media resource.

Offered: Every year, Fall

IDN 527. Society, Culture and Learning.3 Credits.

This course investigates a number of learning paradigms commonly applied to digital resources for instruction, including problem-based learning, cognitive apprenticeship, distributed cognition, anchored instruction and computer-supported collaborative learning. Social and cultural influences on design and implementation of digital resources are discussed. The class examines a range of resources and deconstructs them to analyze the paradigms and influences that shape them. Readings include theoretical and philosophical material as well as empirical studies.

Offered: Every year, Spring

IDN 528. Collaborative Design of Digital Environments.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the design of learning environments as a collaborative effort. Concurrent with ongoing discussion and analysis of existing digital learning resources of many types (e.g., learning management systems, games, simulations, microworlds, social media networks), students work in small teams to create a needs analysis, design specifications for and prototype of their own learning resource.

Offered: Every year, Fall

IDN 529. Educational Media Design Lab.3 Credits.

This course examines the principles, techniques and current practices used to produce and/or deliver interactive multimedia applications for education. Through a series of project-based assignments, students gain experience with a range of software tools used to create media artifacts such as text, graphics, animation, audio, video, games or wireframes. Course makes use of a variety of applications based on each student's specific interests, needs and level of proficiency.

Offered: Every year, Spring

IDN 530. Web Design for Instruction.3 Credits.

In this course, students investigate web-based instructional resources. They examine relevant theoretical frameworks and use these principles to analyze the design of existing web resources, including graphics and functionality. Students develop a design document and a working prototype of a web-based instructional resource using a web design tool such as Dreamweaver. Topics include principles of graphic design, basic literacy in HTML and approaches to content organization.

Offered: Every year, Spring and Summer

IDN 531. Design of Interactive Educational Environments.3 Credits.

This course examines the design of interactive environments, including games, simulations and microworlds, from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Topics include information representation, types of interactivity, user control and pedagogical implications of interactivity, as well as the effective design of these resources for education. Students develop proficiency in the use of an interactive authoring environment or game design platform, depending on the individual's technical background, creating a functioning prototype of their design.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Summer

IDN 532. Design and Development of Online Learning.3 Credits.

What does it take to design a compelling online learning experience, one that engages students and fosters their construction of new understandings? This class examines current approaches to planning, development, and implementation of online courses. Students will apply research-based principles and methods to develop an online "mini-course," designed to support a successful learning experience for the user. IDN 532 provides excellent foundational training in Learning Management Systems.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

IDN 533. Producing Educational Video and Digital Training.3 Credits.

Video segments are commonly found as stand-alone resources as well as embedded in websites, games, online learning environments, etc. Students in this course examine the use of video in education, including theoretical approaches to visual learning as well as practical considerations of how to write, plan, produce and integrate video resources. Depending on the students' levels of technical preparation, they use a range of applications to plan and produce a short video segment.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Summer

IDN 534. Implementing Digital Media for Learning.3 Credits.

This course examines the challenges of implementing digital environments for learning in real-world contexts. Through research articles and case studies, students explore issues such as selecting, budgeting and evaluating technology resources. Within the structure of the class, students may choose to focus on implementing media in K-12 environments (in and out of school), higher education, industry or public spaces.

Offered: Every year, Summer

IDN 535. New Directions in Digital Environments for Learning.3 Credits.

As new digital resources are developed, instructional designers need to be able to understand and evaluate their practicality and value for educational use. This course allows students to explore new and changing technologies, applications and approaches. By definition, topics in this course change each time it is offered, but may include such areas as augmented reality, handheld devices and the maker.

Offered: Every year, Spring

IDN 536. Independent Study.3 Credits.

This course includes supervised study of special topics in instructional design. This option is designed to allow a student to further customize his or her course of study if needed. Each student must submit a proposed course of study including assessment plan for approval prior to enrolling.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

IDN 540. Capstone Experience: Thesis and ePortfolio.3 Credits.

The capstone experience is composed of two parts: 1) e-Portfolio: throughout their course work, students are required to post their best work on their e-portfolio for critique. At this time, the candidate presents the final portfolio for review; and 2) Thesis project: each student creates and presents a design document and working prototype of a proposed instructional resource. This project serves to demonstrate the candidate's fluency with elements of an instructional design analysis as well as using theory to inform design.

Offered: As needed

IDN 541. Capstone Experience: Project and Presentation.3 Credits.

The capstone experience is composed of two parts: 1) e-Portfolio: throughout their course work, students are required to post their best work on their e-portfolio for critique. At this time, the candidate presents the final portfolio for review; and 2) Thesis project: each student creates and presents a design document and working prototype of a proposed instructional resource. This project serves to demonstrate the candidate's fluency with elements of an instructional design analysis as well as using theory to inform design.

Offered: As needed

Special Education (SPED)

SPED 545. Introduction to the Exceptional Child.4 Credits.

This course provides students with a broad overview of exceptional learners. It is a basic overview/survey of all areas and categories of special education. The purpose is to provide an introduction to students with exceptionalities for education as well as noneducation majors. Target subject areas include: knowledge of categorical labels, educational law, program planning and terminology used in the field. (Master's programs, take Fall or Spring) (Certificate program, take January or Summer)

Offered: Every year

SPED 552. Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom.3 Credits.

Treatment of exceptional individuals throughout history and the importance of societal values regarding their differences form the basis for students' understanding of special education from its inception to current practices. Topics of discussion include: history and philosophy, laws, guidelines and procedures related to providing special education; the needs of students with exceptionalities, including giftedness; the particular needs of students for whom English is a second language; and instructional considerations for students with exceptionalities in inclusive settings. From a philosophic perspective, students learn skills to include children with exceptionalities in their elementary classrooms.

Corequisites: Take ED 452L.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Summer

SPED 565. Specific Learning Disabilities: Identification, Instruction and Assessment (LD).4 Credits.

In this course, students have the opportunity to increase their knowledge of specific learning disabilities. Students discuss the supports and strategies that are successful in school so that there is a continuum of strategies that are practiced not just learned. The class expands the student's understanding of the importance of responding to the learning needs of these students in a positive way to help them access the curriculum successfully. The class incorporates tools such as simulations and case studies to understand the challenges and overlaps these SLDs present. Students examine the role of SRBI in identification, as well as questions such as: what makes these disabilities so misdiagnosed/overlooked; which if any are inherited/preventable; are there hidden gifts/talents being overshadowed by LDs; how can including the family in our collaborative efforts benefit the student; how can we identify key strategies to support these students emotionally as well as academically? (Master's programs, take Fall or Spring) (Certificate program, take January or Summer)

Offered: Every year

SPED 566. Autism Spectrum Disorders.4 Credits.

Educational practitioners develop a knowledge base of methods for working with students diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and associated communication disorders. Focus is on the identification of students, as well as the program planning based on instructional strategies in the areas of academic, behavioral, social-emotional and communication. (Master's programs, multiple semesters) (Certificate program, take in January term)

Offered: Every year

SPED 567. Independent Research in Special Education.1 Credit.

This course focuses on research in the field of special education as it relates to students in the educational setting. The research project should include the application of evidence-based practice, the role of families in the educational process and the effects of the disability on lifelong learning. Specific topics/projects must meet with faculty approval. This course is only required for the 12-credit Certificate of Completion in Special Education.

Prerequisites: Take SPED 565 or SPED 566.
Offered: Every year, Spring

SPED 568. Assessment/Program Planning and Evaluation of Children with Special Needs.3 Credits.

In this course, candidates prepare to administer, score and interpret a wide range of criterion referenced, norm referenced and curriculum-based measurements. Candidates utilize information to identify students with specific learning disabilities, make valid recommendations for programming, design appropriate IEP goals and objectives based on the results, and share information with parents and other professionals.

Offered: Every year

SPED 570. Special Education Law.3 Credits.

This course focuses on current and relevant federal and state legislation in the field of special education. Special attention is paid to the interplay of services and protections provided by IDEA, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). In addition, candidates examine the materials to understand the Every Student Success Act (ESSA) that was recently signed into law. Candidates learn how the law affects the planning and delivery of services to children, adolescents and adults with special needs from birth through adulthood. Candidates learn to interpret case law as well as statutes and other legal memoranda that apply to the rights and protections afforded to people with special needs.

Offered: Every year

SPED 571. Emotional and Behavioral Disorder Identification, Management, and Assessment.3 Credits.

This course examines social-emotional-behavioral functioning in the educational setting. Methods of identification, assessment and instructional planning for students with social-emotional-behavioral disorders are addressed in depth. Comprehensive coverage of behavior management, discipline models and building systems of support are examined and discussed. In this way, behavior and/or different learning needs are understood, modifications and supports are put in place and the student is actively engaged in practicing them. This student-centered method results in positive outcomes across the span of the student's life because the student learns and internalizes successful strategies that work consistently.

Offered: Every year

SPED 572. Educating Young Children with Special Needs.3 Credits.

The needs of the young child with disabilities are explored through an examination of social, adaptive, environmental and family characteristics. Candidates learn how to assess children and provide a developmentally appropriate curriculum. The differences between IEPs and IFSP are a focal point, as well as the importance of working with families and professionals in birth to three programs, preschool programs, and kindergarten through grade 2 classrooms. Community services for the young special needs child also are discussed.

Offered: Every year

SPED 573. Reading Disorders: Assessment, Planning and Instruction.3 Credits.

This course provides candidates with the knowledge and skills needed to provide appropriate evaluation, program planning and educational experiences for students with reading disorders, including Dyslexia. Specifically, reading assessments, diagnosis of reading disorders, IEP goals/objectives and program recommendations are explored and discussed. Reading instruction at the intervention and special education identification levels are discussed to ensure students' ability to plan educational programming for students including those with Dyslexia. Further, instructional strategies to support students with reading disabilities who are included in the regular education setting are emphasized. Various methodologies to support students with Dyslexia as they access the regular education curriculum and instruction are included.

Offered: Every year

SPED 574. Understanding and Teaching Students with Intellectual Disabilities.3 Credits.

This course provides candidates with the information necessary to provide appropriate educational experiences for students with low incidence disabilities, including intellectual impairments, physical impairments and those with multiple areas of impairment. The focus is on promoting participation in the school, home and community through developing appropriate transition goals. Emphasis is placed on the use and effectiveness of assistive technologies in working with these students.

Offered: Every year

SPED 575. Working with Gifted and Talented Students.3 Credits.

This course focuses on characteristics of students identified as "gifted" and "talented." Attention also is paid to those who are "twice exceptional." Candidates explore the early development of these children as well as the ways in which their gifts may affect their relationships with their siblings and families. Areas of study include identification, curriculum design and understanding how to provide for their unique social and emotional development, as well as their academic achievement.

Offered: Every year

SPED 576. Implementing Assistive Technology and Screen Capture Tools.3 Credits.

This course examines the rapidly changing landscape of assistive technologies for students with special needs. A focus is on matching specific features of assistive technology devices in the areas of communication, reading and writing to the needs of individual students. Candidates also explore tools such as TechSmith Relay to capture and deliver materials to students who are forced to miss school due to serious health issues.

Offered: Every year

SPED 579. Practicum in Special Education I.3 Credits.

This course is the first of two separate 3-credit practicums designed to provide each candidate professional practice and authentic experiences working with students who qualify under IDEA as needing special education and related services. In addition to course work, the focus is to spend 36 contact hours with the students observing, planning, instructing and assessing them. After each day, hours and reflections should be recorded in a journal. Candidates must design and teach a 10-minute mini-lesson that is filmed. All data collected throughout each practicum is compiled in an e-portfolio. The e-portfolio catalogs the activities undertaken by the candidates including an analysis and description as well as artifacts collected. The candidate, the onsite cooperating teacher and the university professor meet during the practicum to outline the expectations, standards and activities necessary to successfully meet the requirements. Both the candidate and the cooperating teacher are provided with a copy of the requirements of the practicum. Additional meetings are arranged as needed.

Offered: Every year

SPED 580. Practicum in Special Education II.3 Credits.

This course is the second of two separate 3-credit practicums designed to provide each candidate professional practice and authentic experiences working with students who qualify under IDEA as needing special education and related services. For this Practicum, candidates must choose a completely different disability than they did in SPED 579. In addition to course work, the focus is to spend 36 contact hours with the students observing, planning, instructing and assessing them. After each day, hours and reflections should be recorded in a journal. Candidates must design and teach a 10-minute mini-lesson that is filmed. All data collected throughout each practicum is compiled in an e-portfolio. The e-portfolio catalogs the activities undertaken by the candidates including an analysis and description as well as artifacts collected. The candidate, the onsite cooperating teacher and the university professor meet during the practicum to outline the expectations, standards and activities necessary to successfully meet the requirements. Both the candidate and the cooperating teacher are provided with a copy of the requirements of the practicum. Additional meetings are arranged as needed.

Offered: Every year

SPED 581. Research in Special Education.3 Credits.

Candidates submit a proposal for research based on an area of interest in special education. Upon approval of their proposal, they conduct research, collect data and present their findings in a thesis as a culminating requirement for their MS in Special Education. This course is required only for candidates enrolled in the MS in SPED who are not seeking cross-endorsement in Comprehensive Special Education. Prerequisite: Completion of 27 credits in SPED course work.

Offered: Every year