Laws-JD/LLM (LAWS)

LAWS 500. Western Legal Tradition.3 Credits.

Topics in the historical development of Roman, Canon, and Soviet Law and Anglo-American Common Law. This course may fulfill both the jurisprudential requirement and the substantial paper component of the advanced writing requirement.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 502. Tax Procedure-Crim..2 Credits.

This is an in-depth study of the substantive and procedural problems involved in civil and criminal fraud litigation. Also discussed will be the methods employed to prove income indirectly such as the bank deposits method and the net worth analysis.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 503. Deferred Compensation.2 Credits.

A study of methods available to defer compensation, including both qualified and unqualified plans, HR 10 plans, IRA and ESOP plans. This course is concerned with a study of some of the comtemporary problems of tax reform and tax policy. The student will be required to draft a bill revising some tax law and to prepare committee reports explaining the revision.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 504. Tax Policy- S, W.2-2 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;
Offered: Every year, Spring

LAWS 505. Mergers & Acquisitions.2 Credits.

This course will examine the purchase and sale of business entities through a presentation and discussion of the acquisition process. It will introduce the student to acquisition transactions through an examination of the reasons for acquisitions, the types of acquisitions, the structure of acquisition transactions, the documentation and negotiation of the principal agreements and documents to effect an acquisition transaction and certain corporate governance matters related to the approval of acquisitions. The course will focus on private company transactions but will also consider matters regarding public company transactions. This examination will also include a presentation and analysis of the purchaser and the seller issues frequently encountered in the acquisition process. This course is designed to explain to the student the lawyer?s role in an acquisition and to promote an understanding of the theory and the practice of law as it applies to the purchase and the sale of business entities.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 205;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 506. Entertainment Law.2 Credits.

This course examines the legal principles and business practices of several entertainment industries including music, motion picture, television, live theater, and print publishing.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 507. Agency & Partnerships.2 Credits.

This course is based on a series of problems involving common business transactions in the context of business planning and counseling. Emphasis is plaved upon problems of closely held corporations; the allocation of stock and control; issuance of securities and capital structure; valuation; Securities Act problems dividends; reduction of capital; buying out of stockholders; acquisitions via merger or purchase of stock or assets; redemption of stock; liquidations; and other problems of closely held and publicly held corporations.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 508. Worker's Compensation.3 Credits.

The course will cover the law of workers' compensation, with attention given, where appropriate, to the Connecticut Act. The course generally will deal with the liability of employers for work-related injuries to employees. In particular, the course will consider: employees' remedies prior to and apart from workers' compensation; the Compensation Principle; the necessary employer-employee relationship required to activate coverage; the concept of accident; accidents during the course of the employment; accidents arising out of employment; occupational disease; proof of causation and independent causes after the accident; compensation for non-fatal injury; death benefits; administration of workers' compensation laws; and third party suits.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 509. Sports Law.2 Credits.

This course will examine the legal issues involved in amateur, collegiate, and professional sports, including coach and player contracts, NCAA regulation and litigation, athlete-agents, torts involving players and fans and professional player drafts. The course will be taught using a hybrid approach of traditional case method, current cases and issues in sports law, as well as practical exercises such as mock negotiations. Class participation, oral presentations and weekly writing assignments will be required. Sports Law is designed for students with an interest in a career in sports law, or a deep interest in the legal issues surrounding the business of sports.

LAWS 510. Commercial Transactions Workshop.2 Credits.

This workshop will serve as an introduction to some of the practical aspects of transactional practice. Through participation in a simulated common transaction, students will review and draft or edit (or both) portions of documents such as a contract for the sale of goods, an asset purchase agreement, a commercial lease, a promissory note, and a security agreement. The work with the documents will be based on both legal principles and business considerations. Other exercises will include drafting memoranda explaining documents to clients and assisting clients in resolving disputes that arise during performance of an ongoing agreement. The course objectives will include inculcating professional skills in interactions with clients and opposing counsel in deal making. The course should prove useful for students who are interested in transactional work as well as those who are interested in commercial litigation or arbitration.

LAWS 512. Historic Preservation.2 Credits.

This course will explore the extent to which legal protection should be provided for the preservation of historic buildings and the policy reasons for and against such protection. We will study federal statutes governing preservation, religious land use, and archaeological treasures; constitutional issues ranging from the First Amendment to takings law; innovations in building codes that encourage rehabilitation; environmental policy; tax credits; and the utility of nonprofit organizations, stateside and worldwide. We will consider the interaction of those laws with aesthetic and political issues. We will also survey state and local laws across the country with a focus on Connecticut. Satisfies the substantial paper requirement. No prerequisite.

LAWS 513. Land Use Practicum.3 Credits.

In this practicum, students will participate in some classroom meetings, team meetings, and meetings before local land use agencies, primarily during regularly scheduled class time. Students will meet with the local land use agencies in a Connecticut town and will attend their meetings on a regular basis, analyzing applications and reporting to the rest of the class. Teams will be assigned to review selected regulations, present what they find during public sessions in the town, research and draft improvements to the regulations, and present those drafts at public meetings. The course will enable students to gain a real-world understanding of local land use regulations (many of which are profoundly imperfect), critique administrative proceedings, research and draft regulations, and make at least two public presentations. 3 credits

LAWS 514. Tax of Trusts & Estates.2 Credits.

This is a study of the income tax problems of estates and trusts including a discussion of income in respect of a decendent and grantor trusts.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 515. Alternative Dispute Resolution.2 Credits.

This course examines a number of alternative approaches to the traditional resolution of disputes through litigation. These include: adjudicative processes, such as arbitration; consensual processes, such as interest-based negotiation and mediation, including a diverse range of theories and approaches to mediation; and other emerging alternative processes, such as collaborative lawyering. The focus of this course is upon examining and demonstrating how practicing lawyers classically trained for the courtroom must adapt and adjust to a wide spectrum of ADR processes increasingly being used to resolve disputes outside of court. (2 or 3 credits) This is an introductory course and is one of the courses required for the Civil Advocacy and Dispute Resolution Concentration. The course is designed for two or three credits: .Two credits with a final paper required in lieu of an exam (6-8 pages, including footnotes); or .Three credits if a student elects to write a longer final paper (20-30 pages, including footnotes).

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 516. International Business Trans..3 Credits.

Within a framework of the political and jurisprudential underpinning of international law, consideration is given to the problems of the lawyer with a commercial clientele. these are relevant both to governments and private participants. Specific topics covered will include aspects of multinational enterprises, the overseas reach of the antitrust laws, the general agreement on tariffs and trade, the European Common Market, economic warfare, (i.e. blacklists, boycotts, etc.) confiscation of foreign-owned property, trans-national aspects of income taxation, and the role of international institutions such as the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 517. Int'l Humanitarian Law of Armed Conflict.2 Credits.

International Humanitarian Law of Armed Conflict Course Description: International Humanitarian Law (also known as the law of armed conflict and the laws of war) concerns the rules and principles governing the conduct of armed conflict. This course will consider the origins and development of IHL, the Geneva Conventions, and the interaction between IHL and other law, such as international human rights law, international criminal law, and U.S. constitutional law. Specific topics may include the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Iraq and Afghan wars, the treatment of detainees at Guantanamo Bay, the applicability of IHL to international terrorism, and mechanisms for holding violators accountable, including ad hoc international tribunals and the International Criminal Court. Although the focus of the course will be jus in bello, the law regulating the conduct of war, there will be some discussion of jus ad bellum, the law relating to the legality of armed conflict, aggression, and self defense.

LAWS 518. Municipal Externship.3 Credits.

This program allows students the opportunity to intern for a semester with the law department of a municipal corporation. Interns work a minimum of nine hours a week under the direction of the corporate counsel and are exposed to a variety of matters relating to municipal law. Periodically, interns meet with their faculty supervisor to discuss their progress. A grade is awarded on a pass-fail basis after a joint evaluation by the corporate cousel and the faculty supervisor. to be eligible, students must be in good academic standing and have completed at least 31 credits.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 519. State & Local Tax.2 Credits.

This is a study of the major ways state and local governments tax multi-state businesses. Included will be a discussion of the problems of apportionment and constitutional limitations on state taxation.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 520. Public Interest Externship.2-5 Credits.

This program encompasses a broad range of placements in legal departments of public agencies and private not-for-profit organizations. Past placements have included Attorney General's offices, various State's Attorneys offices, Public defender offices, The Connecticut Fund for the Environment, and the Internal Revenue Service. Students are assigned to work with supervising attorneys and devote at least ten hours a week to the internship.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 521. Family&juvenile Law Externship.2-5 Credits.

Students will work in Legal Services offices (New Haven Legal Assistance, Connecticut Legal Services, or Greater Hartford Legal Assistance) or in private law offices, representing low- to middle-income clients in family and child abuse and neglect matters. Family Law and/or Juvenile Law is strongly recommended in the same or prior semester. Optional short paper credit; one two-hour class every other week. (Pre- or co-requisite: Evidence)

LAWS 523. Mediation Externship.1-5 Credits.

Prerequisites: LAWS 374
Corequisites: Take LAWS 374

LAWS 525. Moot Court I.1 Credit.

Participation on the Moot Court Board allows students to build upon the writing and advocacy skills developed in the first year Legal Skills Program. Students practice advocacy skills by preparing and presenting both written briefs and oral arguements, which are usually made before a panel of judges. Members of the student board, elected through an intramural competition held each Fall, compete in national and regional competitions with teams from other law schools. Successful completion of a student's first academic year of membership on the board, including participation in the intramural competition used to select members, entitles the student to one credit. One additional credit may be earned for participation as a competitor or competition editor in an interscholastic Moot Court competition. A maximum of three credits may be gained for all participation in Moot Court Board activities. Moot Court Board credits are granted with the grade of "pass". Any award or credit is based in part on the student's own preparation of a written memorandum or brief assented to by a faculty member and is subject to the faculty member's evaluation and review of the student's entire work in the competition.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 526. Moot Court II.1-2 Credits.

Participation on the Moot Court Board allows students to build upon the writing and advocacy skills developed in the first year Legal Skills Program. Students practice advocacy skills by preparing and presenting both written briefs and oral arguements, which are usually made before a panel of judges. Members of the Student Board, elected through an intramural competition held each Fall, compete in national and regional competitions with teams from other law schools. Successful completion of a student's first year of membership on the board, including participation in the intramural competition used to select members, entitles a student to one credit. One additional credit may be earned for participation as a competitor or competition editor in an interscholastic Moot Court competition. A maximum of three credits may be gained for all participation in Moot Court activities. Moot Court Board credits are granted with the the grade of "pass". Any award of credit is based in part on the student's own preparation of a written memorandum or brief assented to by a faculty member, and is subject to the faculty member's evaluation and review of the student's entire work in the competition.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 527. Corporate Counsel Externship.2-5 Credits.

Students work in the legal departments of area corporations and membership organizations. One two-hour class every other week.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 528. Moot Court III.1 Credit.

Participation on the Moot Court Board allows students to build on the writing and advocacy skills developed in the first year Legal Skills Program. Students practice advocacy skills by presenting both written briefs and oral arguements, which are usually made before a panel of judges. Members of the Student Board, elected through an intramural competition held each Fall, compete in national and regional competitions with teams from other law schools. Successful completion of a student's first academic year of membership on the board, including participation in the competition used to elect members, entitles the student to one credit. One additional credit may be earned for participation as a competitor or competition editor during interscholastic Moot Court competition. A maximum of three credits may be gained for all participation in Moot Court activities. Moot Court Board credits are granted with the grade of "pass". Any award of credit is based in part on the student's own preparation of a written memorandum or brief assented to by a faculty member and is subject to the faculty member's evaluation and review of the student's entire work in the competition.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 529. Advanced Topics in Mediation.1 Credit.

This seminar will require the students to draw on their prior Mediation Course or training (required pre-requisite) and their externship experiences in the field (pre- or co-requisite) and will focus on the integration of their practice with new and advanced concepts. The emphasis of the course is to: . Compare and contrast the differences between the theory of mediation and the practice of mediation; . Study in greater depth the ethical issues encountered in mediation; . Offer opportunities to continue to develop core Mediation skills, including, for example, in more complex, multi-party settings; . Examine the policies and contexts where mediation is in full use, and where there is resistance to its use; and . Explore opportunities for the expansion of the use of mediation and dialogue tools in a greater range of problem-solving contexts, such as consensus building, public dialogue. 1 credit; seven 2-hour classes - Paper; no final exam. Paper will be a 10-12 page compilation of report on experiences with application and integration of theory on methods, roles and ethical issues.

Prerequisites: LAWS 523
Corequisites: Take LAWS 523

LAWS 530. Probate Law Journal I.2-3 Credits.

The Quinnipiac Probate Law Journal is a student-edited law journal covering developments in probate law and practice. The Journal includes scholarly articles, as well as noteworthy judicial opinions from probate courts throughout the nation. Membership on the Journal is based on academic achievement and/or participation in an annual write-on competition. Successful completion of all requirements entitles a student to four academic credits and credit for the substantial paper component of the Advanced Writing Requirement.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 531. Probate Law Journal II W.1-2 Credits.

The Quinnipiac Probate Law Journal is a student-edited law journal covering developments in probate law and practice. The Journal includes scholarly articles, as well as noteworthy judicial opinions from probate courts throughout the nation. Membership on the Journal is based on academic achievement and/or participation in an annual write-on competition. Successful completion of all requirements entitles a student to four academic credits and credit for the substantial paper component of the Advanced Writing Requirement.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 533. The Jury.2 Credits.

Topics may include, among others, the right to a jury, the right to an impartial jury, jury selection practices and techniques, counsel's impression on the jury, techniques of persuasion, and the experience of being a juror. Emphasis will be placed on jury instruction practices, the comprehensibility of instructions, and reform of instruction practices. The student may be required to design and perform a simple experiment concerning mock jurors' understanding of instructions. Simulation work, if any, will be limited.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 535. Adv. Securities Reg. (RICO).2 Credits.

The focus in this course will be on selected problems in securities litigation, including insider trading; fraud on the market, secondary liability; and the Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organizations Act.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 325;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 539. Intro. to Dispute Res. in Healthcare.2-3 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the potential role of ADR in resolving some of the most compelling disputes in the healthcare field. As this course will emphasize both conflict resolution skill-building and content-based learning, by the end of the course, students will be familiar with a spectrum of dispute resolution processes and context specific strategies for resolving conflicts in different healthcare settings. This is an intermediate course designed for students who have some familiarity with alternative dispute resolution and/or healthcare law.

LAWS 540. Family & Juvenile Law Externship.2-5 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 311;

LAWS 541. Fam&Juv. Law Seminar.1 Credit.

LAWS 542. Healthcare Industry Regulation & Control.3 Credits.

This course will analyze and discuss the statutory, regulatory and private contract provisions that govern the delivery of healthcare by licensed providers.

LAWS 544. Advanced Health Law, SW.2 Credits.

This is a limited enrollment course, open only to students who have taken the introductory Health Law course (LAWS 345) or who have professional training in medicine, nursing, or a related field. Students will be expected to do independent research in an area of health law to be approved by the instructor. In addition to producing a paper of substantial legal scholarship, students will be required to make class presentations on their research. This course is cross listed for the Health Care Compliance Certificate (offered in conjunction with the School of Business) and the Scholarly Reflection and Concentration/Capstone Course at the Frank H. Netter School of Medicine. [Prerequisite: Health Law ([LAWS 345)] (2 credits)

Prerequisites: LAWS 345

LAWS 545. Healthcare and Hospital Administration.2 Credits.

This introductory course in healthcare and hospital administration will introduce students to the field of hospital administration and healthcare management.It will give an overview of contemporary issues relating to government healthcare regulation, hospital administration,medical staff credentialing, financial reimbursement,personnel management and federal efforts for universal healthcare coverage.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 546. Law & Psychiatry.2 Credits.

This course will cover the definition of mental illness, the scope of the problem of mental illness and its societal effects, the training of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals, the institutions providing treatment for mental illness, the law with respect to civil commitment, the rights of mental patients, the criminal and civil liability of the mentally ill, and the role of mental health professionals as expert witnesses in selected areas of the law.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 547. Civ.&Pol Rts-1st Amendment.2 Credits.

This course is a study of the law of the individual liberties and civil rights, with emphasis on the First Amendment speech, press, and religion causes.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 110;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 548. Foreign Tax II.2 Credits.

This course includes a detailed analysis of U.S. tax treatment of U.S. individuals and corporations engaged in international transactions, including selected aspects of the "Pentapus" (Sections 531, 541, 551, 951, 1246-47, and 1248), detailed consideration of controlled foreign corporations, calculation of the foreign tax credit, and application of Section 482.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 549. Bioethics.3 Credits.

This course will cover the legal and ethical issues involved in such areas as human experimentation, novel means of reproduction made possible by advanced technology, medical treatment of patients who are incompetent to consent, genetic screening and counseling, abortion, the treatment of defective newborns, the definition of death, organ transplantation, AIDS, and drug and alcohol addiction.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 550. Advanced Administrative Law.2 Credits.

This course deals with selected problems in administrative law of current or continuing interest.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 551. Federal Criminal Law.2 Credits.

This course examines Federal Substantive Criminal Law. It includes a re-examination of the constitutional authority of the national government; judicial, legislative and administrative approaches to limiting federal authority; and the state-federal relationship in the criminal process. The bulk of class time will be devoted to close examination of several statutory offenses, such as racketeering, mail fraud, and conspiracy. The course also focuses on ethical and policy issues confronting attorneys involved in the Federal Criminal Justice System.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 110; Take LAWS 113;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 553. Law Practice Management.2 Credits.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 555. Consolidated Returns.2 Credits.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 556. Supreme Court Seminar.2 Credits.

In this course, students will examine a cross-disciplinary selection of cases on the United States Supreme Court's current docket. They will be asked to predict the outcome of these cases, justice by justice, based upon their readings of similar cases (supplemented by law review articles) which the present justices have already decided. One of the purposes of the course will be to demonstrate that the same judicial philosophies manifest themselves in a variety of seemingly unconnected subjects. While one faculty member will be primarily responsible for the coordination of the course, it may involve participation by a number of individual faculty members representing the breadth of expertise required by the subject.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 557. Analytical Methods-P.2-3 Credits.

The course introduces and examines the analytical concepts and quantitative techniques of economics, accounting, finance, and statistics, as tools of effective legal argumentation and for the giving of sound legal advice. Topics covered include the fundamentals of decision analysis, basic game theory, contracting, accounting, finance, microeconomics, economic analysis of law, fundamentals of statistical analysis, and multivariate analysis.

LAWS 559. Comparative Law.3 Credits.

The principle focus of this course is on the history and present state of the civil law. About one-third of the course is devoted to the evolution of Roman law and its reception in Western Europe. This is followed by an examination of the main institutions of the substantive private law of such leading civil law countries as France and Germany, with some attention also to jurisdictions closer to the English-speaking world such as Louisiana, Puerto Rico, Quebec, Scotland, and South Africa. A brief account is given of the peculiarities of the Continental European Procedure, legal education, and legal profession. There are continual comparisons with the Anglo-American Common Law System.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 560. Current Tax Problems (LL.M).2 Credits.

This is a study of selected tax topics of current interest. It is anticipated that the course content will change from year to year.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 561. Estate Planning & Administ'n.2 Credits.

This course considers techniques of creating, transforming, and disposing of wealth with emphasis on the impact of federal estate, gift, and income tax laws. This is a skills course. Assignments may include drafting of appropriate instuments and problem solving.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 205 LAWS 305;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 562. Family Estate Planning.4 Credits.

This course is an integration of the separate courses of "Trusts and Estates", "Estate and Gift Taxes", and "Taxation of Trusts and Estates". The course will permit students to analyze wealth transfer problems from both the State Substantive Law and Federal Tax Law perspective. The course may extend over two semesters.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 370;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 563. Law & The Humanities S,W.2 Credits.

The course reflects on the Western Legal Tradition and what the practice of law and being a lawyer has entailed in the course of history. The course focuses on legal history, law and literature and popular culture and legal philosophy in historical context. It is an advanced writing seminar that explores topics related to literature and the law in historical context. Themes of law, justice, and ehtics will be examined in the works of authors such as Sophocles, Shakespeare, Austen, Eliot, Wharton, Camus, and Faulkner.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 564. Poverty Law.2 Credits.

The course examines the problems of poor persons and selected governmental and private efforts to aid them; consumer protection laws; the requirements and procedures regulating eligibility for Welfare Assistance; alternatives to the present system of Welfare payments; Housing Code enforcement; subsidized housing; the role of the poor persons in determining and managing programs designed to assist them; legal representation and counseling of the indigent persons.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 565. Social Justice.3 Credits.

Competing theories of justice have implications for how the law does and should resolve a host of concrete issues. In this seminar, we shall first compare the theories of Ackerman (Social Justice in the Liberal State), Rawls, (A theory of Justice), and other contemporary and traditional theorists. We shall then consider how application of these theories would affect resolution of such issues as the following: 1) the proper accomodation of state and parental control over the rearingm, education, and medicating of children, 2) the scope of just compensation for taking of private property, 3) the property/ necessity of Affirmative Action to compensate members of disadvantaged groups, 4) the role of the state in distribution and redistribution of wealth, 5) the balance between interests of living generations and those of future generations in environmental/resource decision-making, 6) competing claims of those accused of crime and victims of crime, and 7) such other topics as seem particularly interesting to the professor of the class.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 566. Supervised Tax Research.2 Credits.

With approval of a faculty member, tax students may select a topic for extensive research culminating in a paper of publishable quality.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 567. Tax Exempt Orgs..2 Credits.

This is a study of the rules related to organizations exempt from federal taxation including problems of unrelated business income. Problems related to qualification under section 501(c)(3) and private foundations will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 568. Tax Shelters.2 Credits.

This is a study of the principal vehicles used to shelter income. Included also will be a discussion of deferral, conversion, and leverage and disposal of shelter interests.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 569. Public Law Seminar.2 Credits.

This seminar will examine selected problems relating to state and local government law in a federal system, and sociopsychological factors in the development of public law. There will be assigned readings for discussion at the seminars. Seminar participants will conduct field studies of selected federal, state, and local governmental and land-use topics. A student might choose to investigate, for example, the resolution of conflicts between state agencies and local governments in the disposition of solid waste, a state's wetlands program, intergovernmental contracts to provide needed public works, the cause and management of local deficits, the structure and reform of local taxation, the budgetary process of a municipality, the initiation, drafting and implementation of local ordinances regulating traffic in a municipality, variances granted by zoning appeals board, or the legality of land-use controls designed to limit growth. In undertaking such projects, a seminar participant may work with practicing attorneys involved in such matters. Seminar participants will complete a research paper in connection with such a project, which will satisfy the advanced writing requirement. The paper topics will be discussed in later seminar sessions.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 343;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 570. Insurance Taxation.2 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 205;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 571. Complex Litigation.2 Credits.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 572. Immigrat'n & Natural'n Law.3 Credits.

An introduction to the practice of immigration law, to include the substantive and procedural rights of foreign nationals. Topics will include: the role of US government agencies charged with administering immigration, admission and entry to the United States, and removal from the United States. Ethical issues unique to the practice of immigration law will be highlighted throughout the course.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 573. Adv. Civil Pro. - NY Practice.3 Credits.

The course deals with selected problems in civil procedure of current or continuing interest. (Prerequisite: Civil Procedure)

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 574. Adv. Civil Pro. - CT Practice.2-3 Credits.

This course deals with selected problems in civil procedure in the state of Connecticut of current or continuing interest.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 575. Adv.Civ.Pro: Complex Litigation Adv.Civ.Pro.:complex Litigation.3 Credits.

Advanced Civil Procedure: Complex Litigation This course will familiarize students with the doctrines, procedures and rules, including but not limited to consolidation, class action and preclusion that are being utilized to resolve complex civil disputes involving multiple parties, claims and jurisdictions. The course will also explore the policy and management challenges presented by the litigation of complex civil disputes.

LAWS 576. Adv. Civ Pro - Federal - W.3 Credits.

LAWS 579. Advanced Externship Seminar.1 Credit.

LAWS 580. Taxation of Bus. Enterprises.4 Credits.

This is a study of basic concepts of federal income taxation of partnerships, traditional corporations, and subcharter S corporations.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 581. Tax Research - S,W.2 Credits.

With approval of a faculty member, tax students may select a topic for extensive research culminating in a paper of publishable quality.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 582. Banking.3 Credits.

This course examines the regulatory structure applicable to depository institutions and includes consideration of U.S. banking history, entry into banking, limitations on banking activities, the bank holding company, geographic restrictions on banking, securities powers of banks, globalization of financial institutions, and current regulatory issues.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 583. Intro to Irish Legal System.2 Credits.

This course will cover the historical background tothe Irish Constitution, the powers and functions of Parliament, Goverment, and the Judiciary, constitutional interpretation, and issues surrounding the role of natural law. We will study the funda- mental rights articles of the Irish Constitution, including the equality guarantee, unenumerated personal rights, the right to life, freedom of expression, assembly, and association, family rights, education, private property, and religion.

LAWS 584. Irish Legal System.2 Credits.

The Irish Legal system shares a common background and history with the American and Eglish systems, but it also has it s own. This course will examine some of the history of the Irish legal system, its courts, procedures, and include an introduction to some of the substantive law of Ireland.

LAWS 585. Economic Torts.2 Credits.

The course explores common law and statutory standards of conduct in relationships between businesses and consumers and between businesses. Topics considered in the course may include unfair breaches of contract, predatory lending, fraud, negligent misrepresentation, statutory theft, conversion, breach of fiduciary duty, interference with contractual relations, commercial disparagement and defamation, and vexatious litigation.

LAWS 586. Advanced International Law.2 Credits.

LAWS 587. Disability Law.2 Credits.

This course focuses on The Americans with Disabilities Act, including its sections prohibiting disability discrimination in the workplace, in public accommodations and in state and local government services. The course explores the key elements of the law, including the definition of disability, reasonable accommodations, undue hardship and the direct threat defense. The course also examines the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Federal Rehabilitation Act.

LAWS 588. Health Law Journal I.1-2 Credits.

The Quinnipiac Health Law Journal is a student-edited law journal. Each issue contains a collection of scholarly articles involving health law issues written by students of Quinnipiac University School of Law and/or legal scholars in the Health Law profession. Membership on the Journal is based on academic achievement and/or participation in an annual write-on competition. Successful completion of all requirements entitles a student to four academic credits and credit for the substantial paper component of the Advanced Writing Requirement.

LAWS 589. Health Law Journal II.1-2 Credits.

The Quinnipiac Health Law Journal is a student-edited law journal. Each issue contains a collection of scholarly articles involving health law issues written by students of Quinnipiac University School of Law and/or legal scholars in the Health Law profession. Membership on the Journal is based on academic achievement and/or participation in an annual write-on competition. Successful completion of all requirements entitles a student to four academic credits and credit for the substantial paper component of the Advanced Writing Requirement.

LAWS 590. Symposium: the Law of Politics & Media.2 Credits.

This is a Constitutional Law course that focuses on the role of attorneys in the political process. We will spend time studying the power of the executive branch; political cover-ups; lying to Congress; impeachment; political deal making; campaign finance; the role of the press; and voting rights.

LAWS 591. Int'l Litigation in US Courts.3-3 Credits.

LAWS 592. Personal Property Leasing.2 Credits.

LAWS 593. Law & Social Science.3 Credits.

LAWS 594. Comparative Legal History.2-3 Credits.

LAWS 595. Adv.Con.Law- Abortion.2-3 Credits.

This course will examine the Supreme Court's most important abortion decisions and selected recent cases in the lower federal courts. Topics covered will include the right to elective abortion, the right to a health-saving abortion, regulation of juvenile abortions, the rights (if any) of fathers and husbands to be involved in abortion decisions, and the nature and scope of the state's interests in protecting fetal life and in promoting maternal health and safety.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 113;

LAWS 596. Franchise Law.3 Credits.

The course covers selected topics in franchise law.

LAWS 597. Chinese Law.3 Credits.

LAWS 598. Native American Law, S,w.2 Credits.

Native American Law Course Description Topics covered in this course include tribal sovereignty and self government in Indian country, the special relationship between Indians and the federal government, federal Indian policy, conflicts involving tribal, federal, and state jurisdiction over Indians and Indian affairs in Indian country, tribal authority over Indians and non-Indians, criminal jurisdiction over Indians and non-Indians for offenses committed on reservations, tribal access to capital markets, tribal economic development, casinos and other types of gaming, land claim litigation, and current issues affecting tribal tribes, their governments, and their members.

LAWS 599. Intro to Representing Clients.2 Credits.

This course is designed to prepare students for individual client representation and work in other practice settings. IRC students explore the lawyer's role, and develop interviewing, counseling, and negotiation skills by representing each other in mock cases.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 600. Law and Gender.2 Credits.

Offered: All

LAWS 601. Managed Health Care.2 Credits.

Managed Health Care This course will examine issues of current interest in the area of managed care. Topics covered may include formation of integrated health care delivery systems and the rights and obligations of third-party payors, providers, and patients. (2 credits)

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 602. Law and Forensic Science.2 Credits.

LAWS 603. Ethics & The Crim Just. System.2 Credits.

This course explores various issues of legal ethics that arise in the criminal justice system.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 113;
Offered: All

LAWS 604. Medical Malpractice.2 Credits.

LAWS 605. Adv. Con Law-Hist Bill/Rights.3 Credits.

The view that the constitution must be interpreted in accordance with the original understanding of the people who wrote and ratified it has gained an increasing prominence among scholars, lawyers, and judges in recent years. This means that lawyers have to know how to read and evaluate the historical evidence that is critical to the resolution of constitutional issues under this view of constitutional interpretation. This class addresses those needs by examining the original understanding of every clause of the part of our Constitution to which we refer to as the Bill of Rights. (4 credits)

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 110;

LAWS 606. Adv. Juvenile Law.2 Credits.

This course covers selected topics in juvenile law of current or continuing interest. Issues may include child custody, adoption, technological advances in childbearing, and the costs and benefits of indeterminacy in standards for child custody. There is no prerequisite but students should have taken either Juvenile Law or Family Law. (2 or 3 credits)

LAWS 607. Legal Services Externship.2-5 Credits.

LAWS 608. Legal Services Seminar.1 Credit.

LAWS 609. Externship Seminar.1 Credit.

LAWS 610. Adv.ConLaw-Comp.Due.Process.2 Credits.

LAWS 611. Advanced Clinic.1-6 Credits.

Some students who have completed a clinic semester will be invited to continue working in the clinic on advanced matters. May or may not have formal classroom component, at the professor's discretion. (By arrangement with clinic faculty; 1 to 6 credits)

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 612. Advanced Tax Clinic.2-5 Credits.

Some students who have completed a clinic semester will be invited to continue working in the clinic on advanced matters. May or may not have formal classroom component, at the professor's discretion.

Prerequisites: take LAWS 295

LAWS 613. Health Clinic Seminar.1 Credit.

Corequisites: Take LAWS 298

LAWS 615. Conn. Adjudicative Criminal Procedure.2 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals necessary to practice criminal law in the State of Connecticut. It examines both the theoretical and practical aspects of Connecticut criminal procedure. The students will be familiarized with the criminal statutes, the criminal provisions of the Connecticut Practice Book and seminal state and federal criminal cases dealing with the Connecticut pretrial process. There will be practical exercises and mock pretrial proceedings which apply the materials covered in class. This course will encompass many of areas of pretrial practice including arraignments; bond arguments; discovery; plea negotiations; pretrial diversionary programs; hearings on motions to suppress physical evidence, identification evidence and/or statements; competency; violations of probation; and sentencing. Prerequisite or Corequisite: Criminal Procedure-Adjudicative or Criminal Procedure-Investigative

LAWS 616. International Environmental Law.3 Credits.

This three-credit course addresses several leading topics in international environmental law and policy, including climate change, ozone depletion, international trade and the environment, biodiversity protection, the polar regions, and the law of the sea. The course will examine sources of international environmental law and the roles that international law institutions play in developing and implementing international environmental agreements. The course also addresses extraterritorial application of domestic environmental law.

Offered: As needed, Summer

LAWS 617. Compar. Trad. & Trends in the Legal Prof.2 Credits.

This course will examine some of the core values, principles, and organization of the legal profession and the practice of law in the US, Ireland, and several other jurisdictions. There will be at least one example from each of the six populated continents. The course will cover the traditions of the several legal systems, and will focus on key concepts such as professionalism norms, confidentiality, duty of loyalty, the nature of the lawyer/client relationship, lawyer regulation, and access to justice. Cultural differences that impact some of these concepts will be explored, such as authoritarian vs. egalitarianism and individualistic vs. communitarian worldviews. The course will also examine the origins and global progress of several new and emerging ?movements? affecting the legal profession, such as Mediation and other dispute resolution methods, Collaborative Law and other innovations in Negotiation, Therapeutic Jurisprudence, Restorative Justice, and Comprehensive or Integrative Law.

LAWS 620. Electronic Discovery & Digital Evidence.2 Credits.

This course will examine the procedural and evidentiary issues that arise in an increasingly digital world. We will focus on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Federal Rules of Evidence as they apply to the retention, storage, production in pre-trial discovery, and admissibility at trial of electronically stored information. The course will be interactive and afford students the opportunity to utilize written and oral advocacy skills in applying the rules of procedure, evidence and ethics to civil and criminal case scenarios. The course will also involve a research paper and no final exam. No special knowledge about computers is needed. Pre or Co-Requisite: Evidence

Corequisites: Take LAWS 311

LAWS 622. Advanced Topics in Mediation.1 Credit.

This seminar will require the students to draw on their prior Mediation Course or training (required pre-requisite) and their externship experiences in the field (pre- or co-requisite) and will focus on the integration of their practice with new and advanced concepts. The emphasis of the course is to: ?tCompare and contrast the differences between the theory of mediation and the practice of mediation; ?tStudy in greater depth the ethical issues encountered in mediation; ?tOffer opportunities to continue to develop core Mediation skills, including, for example, in more complex, multi-party settings; ?tExamine the policies and contexts where mediation is in full use, and where there is resistance to its use; and ?tExplore opportunities for the expansion of the use of mediation and dialogue tools in a greater range of problem-solving contexts, such as consensus building, public dialogue.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 523 LAWS 524;

LAWS 623. Writing Workshop.1 Credit.

LAWS 625. Health Information Privacy and Security.2-3 Credits.

Health information privacy and security are critical components of the current health care culture and health law environment. This course provides an introduction to these privacy and security concerns and surveys key issues including electronic health records, the exchange of health information, privacy breaches, and the globalization of health care and clinical research. The course will discuss the interplay of federal health care privacy law with state privacy law with a focus on the federal Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). The course will also present an overview of international healthcare privacy considerations in cross-border healthcare-related transactions, including tele-health consultations and global research. In addition to reviewing the legal authority, the course will feature sample case studies for analysis and discussion and will emphasize creative, critical thinking about health care privacy and security law in the context of the "real world.

LAWS 626. Evening Clinic: Legal Ethics Project.1 Credit.

LAWS 627. Evening Clinic: Veterans Law Project.1-4 Credits.

LAWS 628. Estate Planning & Drafting.2 Credits.

Estate Planning & Drafting

Corequisites: LAWS 307

LAWS 629. Government Contracts Law.2 Credits.

This course will examine the legal issues pertaining to the United States Government's contracting activities. Students will receive an overview of the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) and underlying statutes such as the Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) and Contract Disputes Act of 1978 (CDA). The course will give students the opportunity to explore the unique aspects of Government contract formation, administration, and litigation in both the private and public sectors.

LAWS 630. Public Health Directive Workshop.1 Credit.

LAWS 631. Financial Planning: Principles and Taxat.2-3 Credits.

This course considers major topics in the field of

LAWS 633. Intellectual Property in Health Care.2 Credits.

Intellectual property rights are important for innovation in health care and public health, and are one factor in determining access to medicines and medical procedures. The course will focus on various types of intellectual property in these areas, including patents relating to pharmaceuticals, medicines, medical devices, and surgical procedures. Related topics to be discussed include patentable subject matter and trade secrets as they relate to healthcare IP, as well as ownership, licensing, and other transactions involving such intellectual property. Policy considerations including the importance and effectiveness of intellectual property regimes and other incentive and funding mechanisms that stimulate research and the creation of new medicines and other products that improve health will also be discussed.

LAWS 634. Int'l Human Rights Law & Trans. Justice.1-2 Credits.

International Human Rights Law & Transitional Justice This year-long course will explore the tension between justice and peace; and, in the transitional justice context, the tension between justice and mercy. Topics may include, among others: the concept of human rights, guaranteeing human rights by treaty, human rights & foreign policy, transitional justice, truth & reconciliation processes, and women, peace & security. The course culminates, for students who are able to attend, in making a presentation at the annual Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates, which meets annually to "engage in dialogue, discussion, and debate about current issues and challenges, promote significant international political and social campaigns, issue statements, conceive and create new initiatives, and hopefully send messages of inspiration and wisdom to the entire world." Since its inception in 1999, the Summit has convened in, among other cities, Rome, Hiroshima, Warsaw, Berlin, Paris, Barcelona, and, most recently, in Bogotá. The course will prepare the students for their presentation by providing an education in the legal texts and historical readings relevant to each year's Summit. (2 or 3 credits: 1 each in the fall and spring, plus 1 credit for attending the Summit, earned in the semester in which the Summit occurs.)

LAWS 635. Negotiable Instruments & Elec. Payments.3-4 Credits.

Negotiable Instruments and Electronic Payments (LAWS 635) Introduction to Article 3 (Negotiable Instruments), Article 4 (Bank Deposits and Collection), and Article 4A (Fund Transfers) of the Uniform Commercial Code. In addition, the course will address various federal statutes, such as the Check 21 Act and the Electronic Funds Transfer Act. (3 or 4 credits)

LAWS 636. Sentencing, Prisons, and Reentry.2 Credits.

This seminar will explore policies and procedures relating to the "back end" of the criminal justice system (i.e., what occurs after a determination of guilt). The course will cover topics relating to criminal sentencing, including sentencing guidelines, mandatory minimums, and constitutional challenges to sentences. We will consider laws and policies relating to incarceration, such as prison conditions, solitary confinement, access to health care for prisoners, and the Prison Rape Elimination Act. Finally, we will examine the "collateral consequences" of criminal convictions and the challenges individuals face reentering communities after incarceration. These questions are pressing given the size of our country's incarcerated population - with more than 2.2 million people incarcerated in America's prisons and jails, we have more prisoners per capita than any other country in the world. (2 credits)

LAWS 637. Payments in Documented Sales.1 Credit.

The portion of this course that focuses on documents of title will include warehouse receipts (and basic bailment law) and bills of lading, including their due negotiation and collection through banks. The portion that focuses on letters of credit will include definitions, issuers' rights and duties, fraud, assignment, and subrogation. The course on Commercial Law is a pre or co-requisite.

LAWS 676. Anatomy for Lawyers.2 Credits.

An understanding of basic human anatomy is a key component of any legal action involving damage or injury to an individual. The purpose of this course is to provide a general overview of basic human anatomy. The intent of the class is to familiarize lawyers with basic human anatomy and some associated physiology. Plaintiff and defense attorneys who pursue personal injury and workers compensation cases focus mostly on joints and limb function, such as the ankle, hip and shoulder and their functional ability, and also on the spine (cervical and lumbar) and the overall functional ability. However, there are other areas of law such as medical malpractice, environmental/toxic tort, pharmaceutical/products, patent, mass tort, Criminal law and other areas of Healthcare law which all deal with basic or different aspects of anatomy and physiology. The areas of law in which a basic knowledge of human anatomy and physiology apply are substantial. The course will give a basic general understanding of human anatomy and physiology, and discuss common injuries and damage which will give attorneys a better understanding when reviewing medical records and evaluating cases and dealing with experts and expert testimony.

LAWS 699. Study @ Another Institution.1-17 Credits.

LAWS 700. Beijing Institute.12-16 Credits.

LAWS 777. Review.1 Credit.