Laws (LAWS)

LAWS 100. Independent Research Project.1 Credit.

The independent research project permits a student to conduct a major research and writing project under the supervision of a full-time member of the law school faculty. The student should prepare a written assignment that is 20 or more pages in length, exclusive of footnotes, per credit assigned. A student who wishes to write an independent research paper must submit to the supervising faculty member a written proposal that demonstrates that he or she has a viable topic for research. The student must register for the course, with the approval of the faculty member, by the beginning of the student's next-to-last semester of law school.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 101. Civil Procedure I.2-3 Credits.

This year-long, first-year course includes an examination of the Adversary System and an introduction to claims and remedies; selection of the proper court; jurisdiction and venue; Res Judicata; collateral estoppel; joinder of claims and parties; pleading; disposition without full trial; discovery; jury and non-jury trials; post-trial motions; and review of the disposition. Both state and federal procedural systems are studied.

Offered: Every year, Fall

LAWS 102. Civil Procedure II.2-3 Credits.

This year-long, first-year course includes an examination of the Adversary System and an introduction to claims and remedies; selection of the proper court; jurisdiction and venue; Res Judicata; collateral estoppel; joinder of claims and parties; pleading disposition without full trial; discovery; jury and non- jury trials; post-trial motions; and review of the disposition. Both state and federal procedural systems are studied.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 103. Contracts I.2-3 Credits.

This year-long course provides an introduction to the law relating to agreements. It addresses such topics as formation of contracts, liability in the absence of an agreed exchange between parties, the meaning and the content of contracts, bases for avoiding enforcement of contracts, the performance of contracts, the consequences of non-performance of contracts, and the remedies available for breach of contract.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 104. Contracts II.3-4 Credits.

This year-long course provides an introduction to the law relating to agreements. It addresses such topics as formation of contracts, liability in the absence of an agreed exchange between parties, the meaning and the content of contracts, bases for avoiding enforcement of contracts, the performance of contracts, the consequences of non-performance of contracts, and the remedies available for breach of contract.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 105. Property.4 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the law of property, primarily real property, with some coverage of personal property law. Topics covered include gifts, historical development and basic common law principles of property law, estates in land, easements, restrictive covenants, future interests in real property, contracts for the sale of land, conveyancing, mortgages, possessory rights, the real property recording system, and governmental land-use regulation.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 107. Torts.4 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to tort liability. The course includes a study of topics such as intentional torts, negligence, strict liability and no-fault theories, and concepts of damages.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 110. Constitutional Law.4 Credits.

The course is a study of basic principles of constitutional law as interpreted by the U.S. Supreme Court. The primary focus is on judicial review, relationships in the federal system, powers of congress, powers of the president, residual powers of the state, and an introduction to civil rights and their protection.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 111. Legal Skills I.2 Credits.

This year-long course trains students in the fundamentals of legal research and analysis, and legal writing and argument. Students are taught how to locate cases and statutes and to apply legal principles in a factual setting. The program focuses on preparing students to think and communicate effectively in written and spoken communications in the legal context. Students prepare such documents as intra-office memoranda, client opinion letters, complaints and appellate briefs, and present oral arguments in a courtroom setting. Clear and effective writing and speaking are indispensable in the successful practice of law and are emphasized throughout the law school curriculum.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 112. Legal Skills II.2 Credits.

This year-long course trains students in the fundamentals of legal research and analysis, and legal writing and argument. Students are taught how to locate cases and statutes and to apply legal principles in a factual setting. The program focuses on preparing students to think and communicate effectively in written and spoken communications in the legal context. Students prepare such documents as intra-office memoranda, client opinion letters, complaints and appellate briefs, and present oral arguments in a courtroom setting. Clear and effective writing and speaking are indispensable in the successful practice of law and are emphasized throughout the curriculum.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 113. Criminal Law.3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to give students a working knowledge of the substantive law of crimes. It covers general definitions, construction of criminal statutes, elements of crimes, causation, parties to crime, criminal responsibility and capacity, justification and excuse, and defenses. The course also covers the inchoate offenses of solicitation, attempt, and conspiracy, and offenses against persons and property.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 114. Administrative Law.3 Credits.

This course comprises a consideration of the origin and growth of administrative process. Among other topics, it deals with: the constitutional position of agencies; administrative discretion in formulating policy; the choice between regulation and adjudication; the binding effect of rules; declaratory orders; administrative jurisdiction and the right to invoke it; primary and discretionary jurisdiction; the investigative function; problems growing out of notice and right; time and extent of a hearing; the process of the institutional decision; the right to judicial review of agency decisions; and the scope of judicial review.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 115. The Bar Exam: Fundamentals & Strategies.1-2 Credits.

This course is intended to help prepare students to take the bar examination. The course utilizes materials from the Multistate Bar Exam (MBE), the Connecticut Bar Exam, a commercial bar-prep company, and professor-created materials. The curriculum includes multiple-choice questions, essay questions and performance test questions; students respond to questions in all formats, and the class reviews and explains answers. The course also includes discussion of study techniques and effective exam-taking strategies.

LAWS 116. Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices.3 Credits.

The course involves an in-depth study of the principal state and federal statutes prohibiting unfair and deceptive conduct in business, including the Connecticut Unfair Trade Practices Act ("CUTPA") and similar statutes in other states, the Federal Trade Commission Act, and the federal Lanham Act. Because of the extensive private remedies provided by many state statutes, claims under those statutes, including those of Connecticut, Massachusetts, Illinois, New Jersey, California, Washington and Florida, have become staples of private business and consumer litigation. The goal of this course is to help students develop an understanding of the policies underlying those state and federal statutes and how they relate to each other and to prepare them to advise clients and litigate cases concerning them.

LAWS 117. Trademarks and Copyright in the Digital Age.2 Credits.

This course provides a practical understanding of trademarks and copyrights and their importance in the business world, from the vantage point of a practitioner in this field. The course includes creation of rights, statutory protection, and enforcement of rights, with emphasis on the ever-changing digital world and the overall evolution of copyright and trademark laws in the context of protecting clients' brands and works of authorship. Grading is based on a paper submitted at the end of the semester, together with class participation and some practical writing exercises throughout the semester.

LAWS 200. Field Placement II.1-10 Credits.

LAWS 205. Business Organizations.4 Credits.

This course examines the main forms of business organization, (corporation, partnership, limited partnership, & unincorporated association) and the concepts, risks and consequences of doing business through representatives. Consideration is given to the promotion, organization and management of the private business enterprise. The course examines the legal relationships existing between the corporation and its directors, officers, stockholders, and creditors; devices to reduce risks; formation, dissolution and termination of partnerships; partnership property and distribution of assets; and agency relationships, concepts, and responsibilities. Attention is given to selected provisions of the Federal Securities Laws and their judicial interpretation.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 250. Symposium: Marijuana Law.1 Credit.

The possession and sale of marijuana is a federal crime. Yet, the Justice Department has decided not to prosecute this offense (so far) in states that have moved to legalize some or all uses of cannabis. This situation has created all kinds of unique and fascinating issues around federalism: preemption, state versus federal regulation, business planning in the shadow of the law, legal ethics, regulation of illegal/legal drug purity, financing for a federally illegal activity, federalism and adherence to international treaty obligations, etc. We hope to explore some of these issues in a Symposium format, with a combination of readings, lectures, discussions, and guest speakers with expertise. The Symposium is open to auditors or drop-ins as well as those who would like to take it for credit, and we will publicize the topics to be discussed weekly. Papers will be required of those taking the Symposium for credit. 1 credit.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 104 LAWS 102;

LAWS 253. Animal Law.2 Credits.

This course canvasses much of the existing legal regulation of animals, such as, at the federal level, the Endangered Species Act, EPA's CAFO regulations of feed lots, the Humane Slaughter Act, the Animal Welfare Act, regulation of food by the FDA and USDA, and regulatory conflicts with constitutional rights, such as First Amendment restrictions on the regulation of depictions of animal cruelty and on regulation of ritual or religious practices of animal slaughter. At the state level, the course discusses cruelty statutes, pet trusts, laws regulating veterinary medicine,hunting regulations, property rights in animals, tort damages for loss of animals, food libel laws, and local regulation of farm animals and food production. It also touches on the pervasive influence in this area of private regulation through industry or university-based standards as well as the influence of international markets and international standards. (2 or 3 credits)

LAWS 255. Judicial Clerkship Seminar - W.3 Credits.

This course prepares students for judicial clerkships at either the state or the federal trial or appellate levels. It supplements the substantive courses that future clerks should take by providing intensive writing experience and by exposing students to a variety of issues important to law clerks. The writing component of the course requires each student to write a bench memorandum, a ruling on a procedural motion, a majority opinion and a dissenting opinion. Each of the writing exercises deals with a different area of substantive law, which may include federal habeas corpus actions, state constitutional law questions, or any of a wide variety of administrative agency matters. Students gain experience in research of the types of done by law clerks and will explore matters of court structure, court procedures, clerkships ethical issues and conflicts of interest. Faculty members with clerkship experience teach the course, with federal and state judges as guest lecturers. Limited enrollment. Full-time students must have completed three semesters, and part-time students must have completed five semesters. Enrollment preference is given to students whose academic performance indicates that they may be competitive in applying for federal and state appellate clerkships.

LAWS 256. Sympos: Police Accountability.2 Credits.

This discussion-based seminar evaluates the methods law uses to oversee police conduct, such as the exclusionary rule, warrant requirements, and civil liability. In addition to studying relevant legal doctrines, students read sociology, social psychology and political science literature about the relationship between policing and democracy. From this perspective, the course asks whether the legal methods for holding police accountable are sufficiently effective. Students also evaluate various proposals for enhancing police accountability. While this course touches on the rules of criminal procedure governing police investigations, the focus is different from a criminal procedure course: The emphasis is less on specifics of the rules governing police investigations and more on critically analyzing those rules. The course also addresses areas outside criminal procedure, such as civil liability, qualified immunity and executive branch oversight of police. Grades are based on in-class discussion, weekly reading responses, and two practice-oriented writing assignments.

LAWS 291. Adv. Writing & Research S,W.2 Credits.

This course offers upper-level students intensive practice in writing and research. It builds on and reinforces skills introduced and developed in Legal Skills classes while focusing on writing and advanced research. Satisfactory completion of the major writing assignment of the class satisfies the substantial paper component of the advanced writing requirement.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 102; Take LAWS 104; Take LAWS 112;

LAWS 292. Independent Research Project W.2 Credits.

The independent research project permits a student to conduct a major research and writing project under the supervision of a full-time member of the law school faculty. Each student prepares a written assignment that is 20 or more pages in length, exclusive of footnotes, per credit assigned. A student who wishes to write an independent research paper must submit to the supervising faculty member a written proposal that demonstrates that he or she has a viable topic for research. The student must register for the course, with the approval of the faculty member, by the beginning of the student's next-to-last semester of law school. An independent research project may satisfy the substantial paper component of the advanced writing requirement if the project is for either 2 or 3 credits.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 293. Independent Research Project W.3 Credits.

The independent research project permits students to conduct a major research and writing project under the supervision of a full-time member of the law school faculty. Each student prepares a written assignment that is 20 or more pages in length, exclusive of footnotes, per credit assigned. A student who wishes to write an independent research paper must submit to the supervising faculty member a written proposal that demonstrates that he or she has a viable topic for research. The student must register for the course, with the approval of the faculty member, by the beginning of the student's next-to-last semester of law school. An independent research project may satisfy the substantial paper component of the advanced writing requirement if the project is for either 2 or 3 credits.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 294. Civil Justice Clinic.2-6 Credits.

Students represent low-income clients in a variety of civil matters in superior and probate courts and before administrative bodies and school officials. Typically, students in the Civil Clinic can expect to represent clients in employment, housing, family, education and health matters, and also engage in legislative and administrative advocacy. One or two class meetings per week. Evening Civil Clinic: Students represent low-income clients in a variety of civil matters in superior and probate courts and before administrative bodies and school officials. Typically, students in the Evening Civil Clinic can expect to represent clients in employment, housing, family, education, and health matters, and also engage in legislative and administrative advocacy. Students are required to reserve at least one two-hour block of time per week for class and supervision sessions. Students also are required to reserve at least one four-hour block of time per semester for daytime client representation; adequate notice is provided to students.

LAWS 295. Tax Clinic.2-6 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;

LAWS 296. Judicial Externship.2-5 Credits.

Students enrolled in this course are placed with state or federal judges and magistrates. Students may be asked to write and present seminar papers as well as to research and write for their judges. Each student enrolled is supervised by a faculty member. Grading on a pass-fail basis is the responsibility of the supervising faculty members after consultation with the judge and seminar leader.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 297. Law Review I.1-2 Credits.

The Quinnipiac Law Review Association is a student-operated association. It publishes the Quinnipiac Law Review (QLR), a law journal that includes articles and book reviews written by legal scholars, as well as case comments and notes written by student members. A board of student editors solicits, organizes, edits and publishes material for QLR. Membership is based on academic achievement and/or participation in an annual write-on competition. Successful completion of all requirements entitles a student to 4 academic credits and credit for the substantial paper component of the Advanced Writing Requirement.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 299. Appellate Clinic I-Defense.1 Credit.

Students represent criminal defendants in appeals of their convictions under the supervision of a visiting professor from the Public Defender's Appellate Unit. Students write one or two briefs and usually argue an appeal before the Connecticut Appellate or Supreme Court. Pre- or co-requisites: Criminal Procedure and Evidence. 6-credit, year-long program beginning each fall: 4 credits in 1st semester; 2 credits in 2nd semester.

Corequisites: Take LAWS 311

LAWS 300. Appellate Clinic Ii-Defense.1 Credit.

Students represent criminal defendants in appeals of their convictions under the supervision of a visiting professor from the Public Defender's Appellate Unit. Students write one or two briefs and usually argue an appeal before the Connecticut Appellate or Supreme Court. Pre- or co-requisites: Criminal Procedure and Evidence. 6-credit, year-long program beginning each fall: 4 credits in 1st semester; 2 credits in 2nd semester.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 299;

LAWS 301. Clinic Seminar.2 Credits.

LAWS 305. Federal Income Tax.4 Credits.

This course deals with the Federal Income Tax System and its impact on individuals and business activity. Emphasis is placed on the following: an intense analysis of the key Internal Revenue Code provisions, treasury regulations, and judicial decisions; fundamental principles and common threads of federal tax policy, economics, and public finance; the relationship of federal income taxation to other areas of the law; and how federal tax laws are actually made (including a continual evaluation of tax preferences available to certain groups). Some specific areas of code included are: items included in gross income, permissible deductions, tax accounting problems, and capital gains and losses.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 307. Trusts and Estates.3 Credits.

This course looks at the law of gratuitous transfers, including consideration of interstate succession, wills, gifts, trusts, and marital property. The choices adopted by Uniform Probate Code are compared with choices made by other statutes.

Prerequisites: TAKE LAWS 105
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 308. Estate and Financial Planning.2 Credits.

This course considers techniques of creating, transforming and disposing of wealth, with emphasis on the impact of federal estate, gift, and income tax laws.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305 LAWS 307 LAWS 309;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 309. Estate and Gift Taxation.2 Credits.

This course examines the Federal Unified Transfer taxes on gratuitous transfers during life and at death and the generation skipping transfer tax.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305 LAWS 307;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 310. Accounting Concepts for Lawyers.2 Credits.

The course is designed to impart an understanding of the basic principles of accounting with which lawyers should be familiar.

LAWS 311. Evidence.3-4 Credits.

This course considers the rules regulating the introduction and exclusion of evidence in civil and criminal trials. Specific subjects dealt with are: relevancy of evidence; the burden of producing evidence and the burden of persuasion; presumptions; competency of witnesses; examination of witnesses; privileges; the hearsay rule and its exceptions; demonstrative evidence; writings and judicial notice and functions of judge and jury.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 313. Adv. Individual Income Tax.3 Credits.

This course covers topics that may be of interest to students who plan to practice in the areas of federal income taxation, employee law, or family law. Topics include advanced issues of tax accounting, issues concerning special forms of income, and issues resulting from financial transactions. (Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax)

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;

LAWS 314. Employee Benefits.2 Credits.

This course provides students with an overview of pension and welfare benefit plans covered under the federal income tax and ERISA (labor) laws. The course covers traditional employee benefits, such as medical, accident, disability, vacation, and unemployment benefits, and defined contribution retirement plans, such as flat benefit plans, ESOP's, profit-sharing plans, 401(k) plans, and IRAs, together with a brief introduction to executive compensation. (Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax)

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;

LAWS 315. Trial Practice.2-3 Credits.

This course provides an opportunity for students to coordinate their knowledge of procedure and evidence with their knowledge of substantive law in a realistic and dramatic setting, with the aim of developing some facility in the techniques of trial practice. The course focuses on the trial and pre-trial process, including: interviewing of clients; investigation of facts; preparation of witnesses; examination and cross-examination of witnesses; choosing a jury; use of experts; discovery and other pre-trial preparations; motion practice; and trial tactics. Students draft motions and memoranda and appear in simulated proceedings. Audio-visual equipment may be used.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 316. Advanced Trial Practice.2 Credits.

This course teaches more advanced practice techniques than the basic Trial Practice course, including the skills of taking depositions, jury selection, direct and cross examination, opening and closing arguments, and evidence. (Prerequisites: Trial Practice and Evidence or Civil Clinic, or Criminal Justice Clinic)

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 317. Adv. Mock Trial.2 Credits.

LAWS 318. Mock Trial.1-2 Credits.

LAWS 320. Public Health Law.3 Credits.

Students examine the legal, ethical and public health challenges posed by contemporary issues such as drug-resistant infectious disease, renewed resistance to childhood vaccination, firearms regulation, controversial testing and screening programs, programs targeting tobacco use and obesity, and potential threats of bioterrorism. Each of these challenges raises the core issue of the extent to which governments may restrain individual citizens and individual choice for the promotion of collective health and safety. When and to what extent must the constitutionally protected rights of individuals yield to the state's inherent obligation to exercise its police power for the protection of the broader community? How does the law function as an instrument of social and public health policy? The historical legal constructs on which public health law is grounded are fundamental to understanding the constraints within which public health authorities must function. Students examine the way in which established public health law principles, legislation, regulation and ethics intersect as public health programs and community health care interventions are designed and delivered.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 321. Lawyers' Professional Responsibility.2-3 Credits.

This course examines the ethical obligations of all attorneys in the practice of law. Our focus is on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and understanding the basic requirements and conundrums that confront attorneys throughout the client representation, counseling and advocacy process. Among other topics, students explore the duties of competence, communication, confidentiality, candor to the court, and the identification and treatment of conflicts of interest. How should an attorney choose between the interests of a client, one's self, and the public in general? Active class discussion based on factual examples.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 323. Commercial Law.4 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the Articles on Sales, Commercial Paper, and Bank Deposits and Collection of the Uniform Commercial Code.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 325. Securities Regulation.3 Credits.

This course involves a study of the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Particular emphasis is placed on the registration, distribution, and sale of securities; distribution of corporate information; and liability under the 1933 Act and the 1934 Act.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 327. Labor Law.3 Credits.

The course covers relations in the private sector between employers and employees regulated by the National Labor Relations Act and associated legislation. The organization of employees, the selection of bargaining representatives and employer responses to these and related activities are considered. Where time permits, the course also considers the legal framework in which collective bargaining occurs. (Strongly recommended: Administrative Law)

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 329. Communications Laws.3 Credits.

This course involves a study of selected issues related to the role of the press in a free society. It may include a brief survey of First Amendment theory as it relates to the press and communications media; defamation; privacy; free press and fair trial; reporter privilege; access to and use of governmental information; right of access to the press; and regulation of radio and television broadcasting, encompassing such questions as regulation of debate, the fairness doctrine, and various forms of antitrust regulation in the communications industry. Future regulatory and First Amendment issues spawned by fast-developing communications technology are considered.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 331. Intellectual Property.3-4 Credits.

This course is concerned with law relating to expression, creativity, invention, and identity. The course covers topics such as copyright, trademark, and trade secret law and materials dealing with the social and economic context of this law.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 332. Patent Law.2 Credits.

The course covers the fundamentals of patent law and the relationship of patent law to other means of protecting ideas.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 333. Advanced Patents.2-3 Credits.

A continuation of the study of the fundamentals of patent law.

LAWS 335. Patents Litigation.2 Credits.

This course involves the study of litigation in U.S. state and federal courts in cases involving patent law.

LAWS 336. Intellectual Property Licensing.2 Credits.

This course covers intellectual property assignments and licenses, including express and implied licenses, negotiation, valuation, standard contract terms, antitrust concerns, enforcement, and contract issues of particular importance in licensing.

LAWS 337. Jurisprudence.3 Credits.

A survey of the problems and perspectives of legal philosophy and an analysis of selected issues.

LAWS 338. Visual Persuasion in the Law.3 Credits.

Students learn to make legal arguments using images as well as words. Students read and discuss interdisciplinary materials including rhetoric, visual perception, social psychology, narrative theory, art history, media studies, and advertising; perform hands-on visual exercises to gain practice in making and responding to images; and listen to guest lectures and see examples of work done by legal visual displays for use as demonstrative evidence and in closing argument in highly realistic hypothetical cases. No prior visual arts experience is required or expected.

LAWS 340. Corp Compliance in Healthcare Industry.3 Credits.

This course addresses both the managerial and legal aspects of health care corporate compliance. Essential elements of a compliance program are presented. Special focus is placed on various pieces of federal legislation and enforcement initiatives conducted by the U.S. Department of Justice and the Office of Inspector General in the Department of Health and Human Services.

LAWS 341. Insurance.2 Credits.

This course is a study of the legal principles applicable to the control of insurance and to the state regulation of insurance. These principles are examined in the light of their institutional setting. Legal and non-legal material is utilized in this course. Topics studied are: formation of a contract; insurable interest; premiums; construction of life, property, accident liability and group contracts; concealments; warranties; conditions; exceptions; waiver; and estoppel.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 343. Land Use Planning.3 Credits.

This course involves a critical examination of governmental and private attempts to control land use. Investigation are made of common law principles and of constitutional restrictions upon 1) private controls such as the Law of Nuisance and Restrictive Covenants; and 2) statutory regulation such as zoning, subdivision controls, growth controls, and land trusts.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 344. Law, Science and Technology.3 Credits.

This course explores several areas in which scientific and technological advances have had an impact on the legal system, either by calling for changes in the system itself, of by provoking attempts to impose legal controls on the conduct of scientific research or the uses of scientific knowledge. The different approaches of law and science to problems of causation and proof are discussed. Specific topics that may be discussed as illustrative of the problems arising at the interface of law and science include (time permitting): behavioral research and the application of social science data to the legal system, the use of scientific and statistical evidence in court, problems created by the computer, legal regulation of scientific research that poses apparent ethical or health problems, and legal control of technology that poses real or apparent hazards to public health (e.g., nuclear reactors).

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 345. Health Law.2 Credits.

This introductory course is recommended for students who are interested in the major state and federal legal and policy issues governing health care, particularly the Affordable Care Act. The course focuses on how the law impacts health care access, quality and costs together with topics such as the patient-provider relationship, and private and public insurance regulation. Students study how to counsel health care clients on dealing with the impact of legislation, regulation, administrative agencies, and case law. This course is cross listed for the Health Care Compliance Certificate (offered in conjunction with the School of Business) and the Scholarly Reflection and Concentration/Capstone Course at the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine. (2 or 3 credits)

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 346. Food and Drug Law.3 Credits.

This course explores both the historical background and current state of U.S. Food and Drug law, including the foundation and evolution of the Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") the pre-market approval processes for branded and generic drugs, biologics, and medical devices, as well as regulation of post-marketing promotion, manufacturing, distribution, and safety surveillance of prescription-only products; regulation of cosmetics, food, dietary supplements, and food additives; FDA inspection and enforcement procedures; federal preemption and tort liability.

LAWS 347. Remedies.3-4 Credits.

This course commences with an examination of remedial goals in torts, contracts, and unjust enrichment cases, with an emphasis on aspects of the modern law of damages. This analysis is continued in specific contexts throughout the course. There is some coverage of equity and on particular aspects of equitable remedies. The course considers remedies for injuries to real and personal property, tangible and intangible interests, persons and status. There also is a consideration of remedies for nominally unenforceable transactions. (3 credits)

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 349. Antitrust.3 Credits.

This course examines the application of the Sherman Act, Clayton Act, Federal Trade Commission Act, and Robinson-Patman Act as controls on economic activity. The course examines the legal responses to problems of monopolization; collaboration among competitors; vertical controls on dealing; horizontal, vertical, and conglomerate mergers; and price discrimination.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 350. Health Care Antitrust.3-4 Credits.

This course deals with the application of antitrust laws in the health care setting. It examines antitrust economics, the basic antitrust offenses and defenses, and applies these to the health care market, including branded and generic prescription drugs. Students discuss antitrust restrictions on hospital mergers, on the formation of physician groups, joint ventures, drug marketing, professional organizations' activities, and managed care. It is not necessary to have taken basic antitrust in advance of taking this course. The beginning of the course includes a review of the major U.S. antitrust statutes and concepts; after that the emphasis shifts to new health care cases, and health care-specific issues affecting the health care industry, particularly its regulation by the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission, as well as joint U.S. and EU enforcement activities.

LAWS 352. Health Care Business Transactions.3 Credits.

This course gives students the opportunity to study health law as it relates to transactions in the health care industry. The course is structured around a set of standard health care business transactions. For instance: 1) A health system desires to provide professional medical services; students evaluate options for corporate organization, physician compensation, and related employment or service contracts; 2) A tax-exempt health system desires to create a joint venture with physicians to provide ambulatory surgery services; students evaluate corporate organization, tax-exemption and fraud and abuse issues, and review key terms of an Operating Agreement; 3) A health system is considering corporate governance issues; students evaluate different options and good governance practices and review key terms in relevant corporate documents; 4) A health system is considering contracting for medical equipment; students evaluate fraud and abuse issues and various key contract issues and provisions. (The professor may elect to use other types of transactions as new developments arise in the health care field.)

LAWS 355. Corporate Finance.3 Credits.

This is a study of the elements legally required for securities valuation in reorganization, recapitalizations, and dissenters' appraisals; rights and priorities accorded different types of securities; and obligations of corporations toward shareholders, together with dividend requirements and policies. Legal accounting and tax aspects of mergers, acquisitions, and tender offers are considered, including an overview of related disclosure and behavioral requirements under securities laws.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 205
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 356. Arbitration.2-3 Credits.

This course surveys the expanding field of arbitration, which is now a primary institution in American and international commerce for resolution of civil disputes. Students review laws and concepts central to arbitration, formation and enforcement of arbitration agreements, the process itself, and judicial enforcement of awards. They also survey the uses of arbitration in a variety of fields such as employment, commercial, labor, and health care law.

LAWS 357. Federal Courts.3 Credits.

This course considers jurisdictions of the federal courts and jurisdictions of the federal courts and conflicts between the federal and state judicial systems. Topics may include the nature of the judicial power; federal question, diversity, and removal jurisdiction; amount in controversy; application of federal or state law; abstention; injunctions of state proceedings; jurisdiction of the Supreme Court; jurisdiction of cases involving joinder of parties and claims and related devices, and procedural questions. Problems may be assigned and discussed.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 110;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 359. Admiralty.3 Credits.

This course involves a study of the jurisdiction of admiralty courts and the laws affecting maritime rights and obligations. Areas included are the history of maritime law, choice of law in admiralty cases, maritime property interests, rights of seamen, carriage of goods, salvage, and collision.

LAWS 360. International Criminal Law.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the jurisdiction, investigation and adjudication of international crimes within two procedural settings: 1) international organizations, and 2) national courts.

Prerequisites: laws 113

LAWS 361. International Law.3 Credits.

This broad survey course examines public international law and the principles that determine to what extent this law is incorporated within the U.S. domestic legal system. Students study a wide range of treaties and customary international law, as well as several of the major international institutions such as the United Nations that play a role in the international legal framework. They also consider to what extent international law operates as a rule of decision for our courts and as authority for or constraint on actions of the President, Congress, and U.S. states.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 362. National Security Law.2-3 Credits.

This course surveys United States law as it relates to national security. Topics include some or all of the following: separation of powers in national security matters, presidential war powers, congressional and presidential emergency powers, the role of the judiciary, the domestic effect of international law, the use of military force abroad, intelligence operations, investigating terrorism and other national security threats, prosecuting terrorists, the Freedom of Information and Privacy Acts, access to national security information, and restraints on leaking and publishing national security information. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 363. International Comparative Health Law.2 Credits.

This course surveys and compares the world's major health laws. It begins with a comp analysis of health care systems, including an inquiry in comparative costs, the comparative populations served by various systems and a comparison of the health outcomes produced systems. The course then turns to comparative analysis of relevant legal concepts, including addressing liability of health care providers, reimbursement of health care providers, health bioethics, including right to refuse treatment and the right to die, and international conventions of right to health care.

LAWS 364. Federal Regulation of Health Care Fraud.2 Credits.

LAWS 365. Comp. National Security Law.2 Credits.

LAWS 366. Energy Law.3 Credits.

This course examines common law cases dealing with land, water, oil, and gas, mining and alternative energy sources. The course considers the place and effect of federal and state regulation, and problems arising from this regard to allocation and conservation. Conflict resolution in this area is discussed, with emphasis on the influence of litigation and litigation strategy.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 367. Counterterrorism Law.2 Credits.

This course is a survey of legal, constitutional and international issues relating to homeland security and the struggle against international and domestic terrorism. Topics may include intelligence gathering at home and abroad, criminal investigations of terrorist activity, detention and interrogation of terrorist suspects, civil detention, military commissions, planning responses to terrorist attacks (and natural disasters), the domestic role of military forces, and the protection of sensitive government information. This course is designed to complement the 2-credit course in National Security Law, which deals primarily with separation of powers and checks and balances in the federal government, in the context of national security, foreign affairs, and the war powers. Without the permission of the instructor, this course is not open to those who have taken a 3 or 4-credit course in National Security Law.

LAWS 369. Real Estate Transactions.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the law of real estate transactions, with an emphasis on mortgage financing.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 105;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 370. Family Law.2-3 Credits.

This course involves a study of the family as a legal institution. Particular attention is given to rights and obligations during marriage and upon dissolution of the marriage. Federal Income Tax is a pre or co-requisite.

Corequisites: Take LAWS 305
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 371. Divorce and the Divorcing Family.2 Credits.

This course examines divorce, custody and visitation, analyzing the emotional impact of these legal processes on children and parents in divorcing and post-divorce families. Students critique the current family law system with the aid of recent legal and social science research materials. The course requirew students to analyze the role that lawyers play in exacerbating and ameliorating the effects of the divorce process on adult and child parties. Students examine ethical and practical constraints of integrating an interdisciplinary perspective to a family law practice and explore the benefits and limitations of divorce-related communication between family lawyers and mental health clinicians. (Prerequisite: Family Law)

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 370;

LAWS 372. Representation in Mediation.2 Credits.

The principal focus of this course is to explore mediation advocacy issues for the practitioner representing a client in a mediation. Mediation concepts and implications for developing skills for client representation are examined. Mediation-oriented styles, skills and techniques are contrasted with the techniques required in litigation and arbitration. The exclusive emphasis is on the practitioner's role as an advocate rather than as a neutral/mediator. (1 credit)

Corequisites: Take LAWS 428

LAWS 373. Products Liability.3 Credits.

This course examines the emerging field of products liability law with emphasis on negligence, warranty, fraud, and strict liability in tort. Consideration is given to problems of proof and evidence, especially in the areas of drugs, automobiles and industrial machinery.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 374. Introduction to Mediation.2 Credits.

This course introduces students to basic mediation skills, practice and theory, including the benefits and limitations of mediation as a dispute resolution method. Class time is divided nearly equally between developing mediation skills as an impartial third party and discussing conceptual issues and challenges facing third-party neutrals.

LAWS 375. Legislation.2 Credits.

This course considers the legislature in perspective, examining it in its working relationships with other institutions of the American Legal System. The course is designed to develop an understanding of the potentialities and limitations of the legislative process. Students select an enumerated problem and propose a legislative solution.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 376. Advanced Land Use Writing Seminar.2 Credits.

The objective of the course is to research and write a publishable article of about 6,000 words on a narrowly focused issue of land use law. Students also have an opportunity to present in class several times, receive reviews of their work by classmates, and critique the work of others.

LAWS 377. Energy Regulation and Public Policy.2 Credits.

Energy regulation touches core environmental, economic and social issues. The interplay of traditional utility regulation and recent restructuring initiatives that rely on markets to deliver reliable and reasonably priced power creates many political, economic and regulatory tensions. Focusing on the regulation and design of U.S. electric power systems (i.e., the generation, transmission and distribution of electricity) and related markets, with some limited exposure to natural gas developments and their impacts on electric markets, this course provides an introduction to the explicit and implicit policy tradeoffs inherent in the current and evolving system of energy regulation at the state, regional and federal levels. Topics covered include the classic cost of service regulation, competitive generation, wholesale market structures, regional transmission organizations, microgrids, "behind the meter" generation, net metering, submetering, renewable portfolio standards, the emerging role of demand response and efficiency as supply resources, retail competition and retail rate design. Guest speakers from industry and government provide diverse perspectives based on their experience in the regulatory and policy arena. The course introduces students to the roles, jurisdiction and tension of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the Connecticut Public Utilities Regulatory Authority.

LAWS 379. Environmental Law.3 Credits.

This course examines the legislative, administrative and judicial responses to environmental problems. Students primarily focus on the major federal environmental statutes, including the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, and protections for endangered species and wilderness. Students also evaluate common law remedies, state environmental protections, and major international environmental issues, including climate change.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 380. Secured Transactions.2-3 Credits.

Security interests in personal property under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code are considered. (Depending on the professor, Commercial Law may be a pre- or corequisite.)

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 381. Law and Economics.2 Credits.

This course explores the use of economic analysis in the study of specific legal problems, of the existing legal system, and of proposed modifications to existing legal structures. It begins by examining the nature of economic reasoning and limitation of applying economic theory, the course explores the economic foundations of property law, including entitlement theory, pollution problems, monopoly problems, government allocation of resources, and public property rights. It then examines the economic theory as applied to criminal sanctions and criminal law, tort negligence theory, strict liability, economic foundations of contract law, and contract impossibility. The direction of the course from that point is partially determined by the interest of the class but may include problems of population control, allocation of scarce medical resources, justification of inheritance, economic analysis of rent control and housing code enforcement, consumer problems, and military service. In general, the course avoids delving into areas that are covered in depth in other courses such as tax policy, antitrust law, and regulated industries.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 384. Juvenile Law.3 Credits.

The course examines the legal rights and responsibilites of minors. Topics to be studied include delinquency, abuse and neglect, representation of children in custody disputes, and educational rights of handicapped children. The course devotes attention to the role of the attorney, juvenile court and social and diagnostic services available to children and youths.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 385. Adv. Juvenile Law - Child Protection Practices.2 Credits.

LAWS 386. Domestic Violence: Law, Practice and Pol.2 Credits.

This course examines domestic violence from a legal perspective. It includes a historical analysis of intimate partner violence and the various legal and societal changes that have evolved to form the current legal responses. Students explore a wide range of topics, including police and prosecutorial responses, expert witness testimony, battered women as criminal defendants, cultural differences, domestic violence in divorce and child custody disputes, legal remedies for battered immigrants, and domestic violence as a human rights and public health concern. The course is interactive and affords students the opportunity to utilize written and oral advocacy skills in applying the rules of evidence and ethics to civil and criminal issues around domestic violence.

LAWS 387. Adv. Juvenile Law: Delinquency Proceedings.2 Credits.

This course covers selected topics in juvenile law of current or continuing interest. Issues may include child custody, adoption, technological advances in childbearing, and the costs and benefits of indeterminacy in standards for child custody. There is no prerequisite but students should have taken either Juvenile Law or Family Law.

LAWS 388. Elder Law.2-3 Credits.

This course integrates such topics as estate planning, retirement planning, planning for Medicare, Medicaid, and other governmental entitlements, contracts for long-term nursing care, etc.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 390. Consumer Law.3 Credits.

This course addresses problems of formation of consumer transactions, the substance of consumer transactions, and the remedies available to the parties. The focus is on whether any intervention to protect the consumers is warranted, what forms intervention might take, and evaluating the cost and benefit of intervention. (Prerequisite: Commercial Law)

LAWS 391. Civil and Political Rights Equal Protection.2 Credits.

This course is a study of the law of individual liberties and civil rights, with emphasis upon the Fourteenth Amendment's equal protection clause and civil rights legislation.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 110;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 393. Business Planning.4 Credits.

This course represents an opportunity for students to integrate their work in previous substantive courses by examining a series of common business transactions. Students work in groups to consider and make recommendations to their "clients" on the choice of entity, capitalization, control, valuation, compensation, and management. They consider the opportunities for expansion if the business is successful, including "going public," merger or acquisition, or sale of the business. They also consider the consequences of failure: liquidation or dissolution of the business. Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation.

Corequisites: LAWS 305
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 396. Bankruptcy and Creditors' Rights.3 Credits.

As events of the Great Recession have demonstrated, insolvency and the potential for insolvency affect many transactions and complicate efforts to enforce judgments and to resolve disputes. Practitioners in many fields including lending, commercial transactions, general litigation and family law will confront a bankruptcy issue at some point in their careers. This class begins with an overview of the various state law creditor remedies and debtor protections. The course focuses primarily on relief available for consumer and business debtors and the treatment of claims of secured and unsecured creditors under the Bankruptcy Code. Students explore issues in Chapter 7 (liquidation), Chapter 13 (individual reorganization) and Chapter 11 (business reorganization) bankruptcies. They survey out-of-court procedures such as workouts, sales under the UCC, compositions, receiverships and assignments for the benefit of creditors. Class discussion focuses more on problems than cases. The class applies legal principles in discussing solutions to practical problems. To the extent feasible, the class invites guests who practice in the field, examines pleadings in actual cases and provides practice pointers to assist students in the transition to becoming a lawyer.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 404. Criminal Justice Externship.2-5 Credits.

Students work in federal and state prosecution and public defender offices in Connecticut and, in some instances, in neighboring states. Pre- or co-requisites: Criminal Procedure and Evidence

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 407. Legal Drafting & Writing.2-3 Credits.

This is a practical course, designed to teach students the fundamental skills of advocating a client's position in an appellate court, on appeal after an interlocutory order or trial court judgment. The course is designed to develop various lawyering skills including oral advocacy, legal writing and drafting, and legal research. Taught by a veteran appellate litigator, the course will also explore real life ethical and professional issues that arise in appellate litigation, as well as strategies on appeal. Completion of the course automatically satisfies the substantial paper requirement. (2 credits)

LAWS 408. Bankruptcy Lab.1 Credit.

This course is designed to assist students in making the transition from law school to practice in a business setting. Using their knowledge of bankruptcy law, students will write memos; participate in mock client-counseling, negotiation and advocacy exercises; and comment on each other's work. In addition to bankruptcy law, course material and presentations will emphasize business concepts, including financial literacy and rehabilitation of small to mid-sized troubled businesses. Although the course focuses specifically on insolvency, the practice skills emphasized, such as understanding the business contexts in which legal problems can arise, are also required for success in other business settings. Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior enrollment in Bankruptcy 396 01.

Corequisites: Take LAWS 396

LAWS 409. Drug and Device Law.2-3 Credits.

This course explores both the historical background and current state of the regulation of prescription brand-name and generic drugs, over-the-counter drugs, medical devices, biological products, and cosmetics, including the process for premarket approval of these products. The relevant provisions of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act will be covered, as well as the Food and Drug Administration's authority to enforce the statute through administrative regulations and court enforcement. The relationships between FDA, Congress, and industry will be explored and analyzed. Students will consider the development and marketing of "biosimilar" products pursuant to the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009. Other topics will include the regulation of advertising and promotional activities including off-label promotion, federal preemption in cases involving injury to patients from branded or generic drugs, FDA's inspection and enforcement procedures, and criminal liability for individuals and corporations. (May be offered for 2 or 3 credits dependent on instructor)

LAWS 412. Habeas Corpus.2 Credits.

This course will examine the legal and pragmatic place of habeas corpus and other post-conviction remedies in our criminal justice system, including cases of wrongful conviction and innocence. Topics will include the function of habeas in relationship to the other stages of a criminal case, with emphasis on actual innocence and the death penalty, and the role of DNA and other forensic science tools. This course will also explore the duties of the prosecution, involuntary confessions, racial discrimination and ineffective assistance of counsel. Students will receive an introduction to the contrasting procedural rules governing habeas corpus in state and federal court, and a comparison of habeas corpus versus other remedies (including non-adversarial remedies) for addressing wrongful convictions and claims of innocence. Prerequisite: Criminal Procedure Adjudicative or Investigative (2 or 3 credits)

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 431 or LAWS 432

LAWS 413. Community Needs Assesment Lab.1-3 Credits.

Increasingly, law school students and graduates are expected to create their own practices or generate a new book of business, rather than being able to rely upon a book of existing business being handed down from senior and retiring attorneys. In order to build a new practice, attorneys must identify existing unmet legal needs in the community and then both leverage existing resources and develop new capacities to meet these needs. This course is designed to provide law students an opportunity to explore and apply community needs assessment tools developed by public health professionals to better define unmet needs in a community, understand barriers to meeting those needs, assess existing internal and external resources, and build effective practices or programs. Anticipated to take place in the spring semester, this course is specifically framed to allow the week of spring break to be spent collecting data in communities where travel is necessary. Prerequisites (needs at least 1): Current or prior enrollment in Public Health Law, Poverty Law, Environmental Law, Immigration Law, Family Law, Juvenile Law, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Negotiation, Education Law, Federal Criminal Law, Federal Income Taxation of Individuals, or International Law

LAWS 414. Food Law.2-3 Credits.

This course is designed to examine the legal and policy issues associated with the Food and Drug Administration's regulation of foods and dietary supplements and tobacco products. The class will review the statutory provisions of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as well as the governing case law, implementing regulations, and administrative actions that govern the development/formulation, product positioning and approval/clearance, and labeling/marketing of these products. The course will also cover food safety issues, focusing on the Food Safety Modernization Act of 2011 and FDA's rules on restaurant menu and vending machine labeling. There will be some coverage of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, its authority over meat and poultry products, and its regulation of organic programs under the Organic Foods Production Act. Students will receive a comprehensive overview of the historical background and current state of FDA, and will explore FDA's expanding authority over novel technologies, enforcement and inspection powers, and post-marketing surveillance to address safety concerns. (2 or 3 credits dependent on instructor)

LAWS 415. Business Law Externship.2-5 Credits.

LAWS 416. Health Law Externship.2-5 Credits.

LAWS 417. Intellectual Property Externship.2-5 Credits.

LAWS 418. Advanced Constitutional Law - Civil Righ.2 Credits.

LAWS 419. Adv.Con.Law-1st Amendment Religion Claus.3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 110;

LAWS 423. State Constitutional Law.2-3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 110;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 426. Employment Discrimination Law.3 Credits.

This course examines the multitude of statutes- federal, state, and local- that provide for equal employment opportunities regardless of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, or physical or mental handicaps. The effectiveness of the various remedies is explored and the administrative processing of complaints is reviewed. Litigation strategies are also considered.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 428. Negotiation.2-3 Credits.

In this course students will study negotiation from theoretical and practical perspectives. The course will use lecture, discussion, film, and simulations to introduce students to the key features of negotiation. Each student will engage in a series of role play exercises, with an opportunity for critique and debriefing with faculty and fellow students. Spring 2019: Mondays January 7, 14, 28, February 4, 11, 25 and March 4, 18, 25

LAWS 429. International Human Rights.2 Credits.

This course considers human rights under the United Nations Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and other U.N. documents and resolutions, as well as U.N. investigation of human rights violations. The course also examines regional arrangements to protect human rights, exemplified by the European Human Rights Convention and its inter-American counterpart. It is desirable but not essential that the student have completed a course in international law.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 430. International Trade.3 Credits.

The course will cover domestic and international laws and insti- tutions governing foreign trade, including the legal consequences of U.S. participation in the GATT, UNCTAD, and other internation- al forums, law regulating customs and tariffs, government pro- curement, subsidies, dumping, unfair foreign trade practices, disruptive imports under the escape clause, the generalized system of preferences, most-favored nation treatment, exports under the Export Administration Act, and foreigh assets control; the impact of Friendship, Commerce, and Navigation treaties. Specialized problems will include foreign corrupt practices, and restrictive business practices. NAFTA, Custom Unions and Free Trade Areas.

LAWS 431. Criminal Procedure - Adj..3 Credits.

This course deals with the adjudicative stage of the criminal justice process. It includes the initial appearance following arrest, the decision to prosecute, the preliminary hearing, bail, indictment, pleas and plea bargaining, the trial, and double jeopardy. The major emphasis is on the constitutional limitations on the adjudication of criminal matters.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 432. Criminal Procedure Inv..3 Credits.

This course deals with the investigative stage of the criminal justice process. It focuses on the police function, emphasizing the constitutional limitations on that function and the means of enforcing those limitations. The course includes a consideration of such matters as arrest, stop and frisk, search and seizure, eavesdropping, wiretapping, identification procedures, and questioning of suspects.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 433. Advanced Labor Law.3 Credits.

This course deals with selected problems in labor law of current or continuing interest.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 434. Employment Law.3 Credits.

This course presents an introduction to the laws that apply to the employer-employee relationship. It reviews issues that confront the employment lawyer practicing within the myriad regulatory laws and regulations governing employer and worker rights under federal, state and common law. The course examines a selection of various issues that arise in employment law such as the development of employment law, and sources of modern employment law in public employment, collective bargaining, non-discrimination, employment-at-will, judicial modification of employment-at-will, establishment of the employment relationship, a brief survey of the laws against discrimination, a review of wage and hour laws, pay equity and comparative worth, fringe benefits, conditions of employment in the work environment, OSHA and workers compensation, regulations and laws governing discharge, termination employment, unemployment and retirement.

LAWS 435. Advanced Family Law I - S.2 Credits.

This course deals with selected problems in family law of current or continuing interest.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 370;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 437. Computer and Internet Law.2 Credits.

This course covers computer hardware and software applications of copyright, patent, and unfair trade practices law, contracts for computer services and technology, invasion of privacy, and other related topics.

LAWS 438. Advanced Family Law II.2 Credits.

Corequisites: LAWS 370

LAWS 442. Sports & Entertainment Externship.2-5 Credits.

LAWS 443. Tax Law Externship.2-5 Credits.

LAWS 444. Employment Law Externship.2-5 Credits.

LAWS 446. Environmental Law Externship.2-5 Credits.

LAWS 450. Non-Profit Organizations.2 Credits.

This course explores the historical development and principal theoretical rationals for the non-profit sector. It examines the formation, classification, peration, and goverances of non-profit organizations under both state and federal law. Particular emphasis will be given to state corporation law and federal tax exemption issues, including responsibilities and liabilities of directors, officers, and volunteers; financial management; the public policy issues involving commercial, lobbying, and other political activities; and constitutional issues affecting non- profit organizations.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;

LAWS 454. Advanced Corp. Tax.2 Credits.

This course explores the federal income tax consequences that follow when a corporate business is transferred to new owners. Principal topics of study are taxable asset and stock transfers and the statutorily prescribed scheme for nontaxable corporate reorganizations. (2 credits)

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305 LAWS 580;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 457. Healthcare Compliance Law.3 Credits.

This course illuminates the legal aspects of health care compliance. At both the federal and state levels, the course addresses the statutory, regulatory, and case law that comprises the complex legal backdrop in which the healthcare industry operates. The course introduces the history, purpose, and substance of healthcare regulatory compliance programs and addresses legal doctrines concerning reimbursement law and related fraud and abuse, legal restrictions on physician referral and related anti-kickback laws, antitrust law, compliance issues in healthcare business transactions, compliance mandates in the Affordable Care Act, and the law governing healthcare research.

LAWS 464. Legislative Externship.2-5 Credits.

This internship places students in positions with members of the Connecticut legislature, and in the offices of the governor. Successful completion of a course in legislation may be a prerequisite.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 470. Legislative Externship Seminar.1 Credit.

LAWS 471. Education Law.2 Credits.

This course covers those aspects of education which are regulated or influenced by law. Areas of study include; the rights of teachers, students, and parents in a school system; state compulsory education laws; school disciplinary processes; teacher tenure and union issues; and regulation of public, parochial and private education.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 477. International Tax.2 Credits.

An analysis of the US tax treatment of nonresident aliens and foreign corporations, the US tax treatment of US individuals and corporations engaged in international transactions, calculations of the foreign tax credit, and US taxation of controlled foreign corporations.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 497. Law Review II W.1-3 Credits.

The Quinnipiac Law Review Association is a student operated association. It publishes the Quinnipiac Law Review (QLR), a law journal that includes articles and book reviews written by legal scholars, as well as case comments and notes written by student members. A board of student editors solicits, organizes, edits, and publishes material for QLR. Membership is based on academic achievement and/or participation in an annual write-on competition. Successful completion of all requirements entitles a student to four academic credits and credit for the substantial paper component of the Advanced Writing Requirement.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 504. Tax Policy- S, W.2-2 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;
Offered: Every year, Spring

LAWS 505. Mergers & Acquisitions.2 Credits.

This course will examine the purchase and sale of business entities through a presentation and discussion of the acquisition process. It will introduce the student to acquisition transactions through an examination of the reasons for acquisitions, the types of acquisitions, the structure of acquisition transactions, the documentation and negotiation of the principal agreements and documents to effect an acquisition transaction and certain corporate governance matters related to the approval of acquisitions. The course will focus on private company transactions but will also consider matters regarding public company transactions. This examination will also include a presentation and analysis of the purchaser and the seller issues frequently encountered in the acquisition process. This course is designed to explain to the student the lawyer?s role in an acquisition and to promote an understanding of the theory and the practice of law as it applies to the purchase and the sale of business entities.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 205;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 506. Entertainment Law.2 Credits.

This course examines the legal principles and business practices of several entertainment industries including music, motion picture, television, live theater, and print publishing.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 508. Worker's Compensation.2 Credits.

The course will cover the law of workers' compensation, with attention given, where appropriate, to the Connecticut Act. The course generally will deal with the liability of employers for work-related injuries to employees. In particular, the course will consider: employees' remedies prior to and apart from workers' compensation; the Compensation Principle; the necessary employer-employee relationship required to activate coverage; the concept of accident; accidents during the course of the employment; accidents arising out of employment; occupational disease; proof of causation and independent causes after the accident; compensation for non-fatal injury; death benefits; administration of workers' compensation laws; and third party suits.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 509. Sports Law.2 Credits.

This course will examine the legal issues involved in amateur, collegiate, and professional sports, including coach and player contracts, NCAA regulation and litigation, athlete-agents, torts involving players and fans and professional player drafts. The course will be taught using a hybrid approach of traditional case method, current cases and issues in sports law, as well as practical exercises such as mock negotiations. Class participation, oral presentations and weekly writing assignments will be required. Sports Law is designed for students with an interest in a career in sports law, or a deep interest in the legal issues surrounding the business of sports.

LAWS 510. Commercial Transactions Workshop.2 Credits.

This workshop will serve as an introduction to some of the practical aspects of transactional practice. Through participation in a simulated common transaction, students will review and draft or edit (or both) portions of documents such as a contract for the sale of goods, an asset purchase agreement, a commercial lease, a promissory note, and a security agreement. The work with the documents will be based on both legal principles and business considerations. Other exercises will include drafting memoranda explaining documents to clients and assisting clients in resolving disputes that arise during performance of an ongoing agreement. The course objectives will include inculcating professional skills in interactions with clients and opposing counsel in deal making. The course should prove useful for students who are interested in transactional work as well as those who are interested in commercial litigation or arbitration.

LAWS 512. Historic Preservation.2 Credits.

This course will explore the extent to which legal protection should be provided for the preservation of historic buildings and the policy reasons for and against such protection. We will study federal statutes governing preservation, religious land use, and archaeological treasures; constitutional issues ranging from the First Amendment to takings law; innovations in building codes that encourage rehabilitation; environmental policy; tax credits; and the utility of nonprofit organizations, stateside and worldwide. We will consider the interaction of those laws with aesthetic and political issues. We will also survey state and local laws across the country with a focus on Connecticut. Satisfies the substantial paper requirement. No prerequisite.

LAWS 513. Land Use Practicum.3 Credits.

In this practicum, students will participate in some classroom meetings, team meetings, and meetings before local land use agencies, primarily during regularly scheduled class time. Students will meet with the local land use agencies in a Connecticut town and will attend their meetings on a regular basis, analyzing applications and reporting to the rest of the class. Teams will be assigned to review selected regulations, present what they find during public sessions in the town, research and draft improvements to the regulations, and present those drafts at public meetings. The course will enable students to gain a real-world understanding of local land use regulations (many of which are profoundly imperfect), critique administrative proceedings, research and draft regulations, and make at least two public presentations. 3 credits

LAWS 515. Alternative Dispute Resolution.2-3 Credits.

This course examines a number of alternative approaches to the traditional resolution of disputes through litigation. These include: adjudicative processes, such as arbitration; consensual processes, such as interest-based negotiation and mediation, including a diverse range of theories and approaches to mediation; and other emerging alternative processes, such as collaborative lawyering. The focus of this course is upon examining and demonstrating how practicing lawyers classically trained for the courtroom must adapt and adjust to a wide spectrum of ADR processes increasingly being used to resolve disputes outside of court. This is an introductory course and is one of the courses required for the Civil Advocacy and Dispute Resolution Concentration.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 516. International Business Trans..3 Credits.

Within a framework of the political and jurisprudential underpinning of international law, consideration is given to the problems of the lawyer with a commercial clientele. these are relevant both to governments and private participants. Specific topics covered will include aspects of multinational enterprises, the overseas reach of the antitrust laws, the general agreement on tariffs and trade, the European Common Market, economic warfare, (i.e. blacklists, boycotts, etc.) confiscation of foreign-owned property, trans-national aspects of income taxation, and the role of international institutions such as the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 517. Int'l Humanitarian Law of Armed Conflict.2 Credits.

International Humanitarian Law of Armed Conflict Course Description: International Humanitarian Law (also known as the law of armed conflict and the laws of war) concerns the rules and principles governing the conduct of armed conflict. This course will consider the origins and development of IHL, the Geneva Conventions, and the interaction between IHL and other law, such as international human rights law, international criminal law, and U.S. constitutional law. Specific topics may include the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Iraq and Afghan wars, the treatment of detainees at Guantanamo Bay, the applicability of IHL to international terrorism, and mechanisms for holding violators accountable, including ad hoc international tribunals and the International Criminal Court. Although the focus of the course will be jus in bello, the law regulating the conduct of war, there will be some discussion of jus ad bellum, the law relating to the legality of armed conflict, aggression, and self defense.

LAWS 518. Municipal Externship.3 Credits.

This program allows students the opportunity to intern for a semester with the law department of a municipal corporation. Interns work a minimum of nine hours a week under the direction of the corporate counsel and are exposed to a variety of matters relating to municipal law. Periodically, interns meet with their faculty supervisor to discuss their progress. A grade is awarded on a pass-fail basis after a joint evaluation by the corporate cousel and the faculty supervisor. to be eligible, students must be in good academic standing and have completed at least 31 credits.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 520. Public Interest Externship.2-5 Credits.

This program encompasses a broad range of placements in legal departments of public agencies and private not-for-profit organizations. Past placements have included Attorney General's offices, various State's Attorneys offices, Public defender offices, The Connecticut Fund for the Environment, and the Internal Revenue Service. Students are assigned to work with supervising attorneys and devote at least ten hours a week to the internship.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 521. Family&juvenile Law Externship.2-5 Credits.

Students will work in Legal Services offices (New Haven Legal Assistance, Connecticut Legal Services, or Greater Hartford Legal Assistance) or in private law offices, representing low- to middle-income clients in family and child abuse and neglect matters. Family Law and/or Juvenile Law is strongly recommended in the same or prior semester. Optional short paper credit; one two-hour class every other week. (Pre- or co-requisite: Evidence)

LAWS 523. Mediation Externship.1-5 Credits.

Prerequisites: LAWS 374
Corequisites: Take LAWS 374

LAWS 525. Moot Court I.1 Credit.

Participation on the Moot Court Board allows students to build upon the writing and advocacy skills developed in the first year Legal Skills Program. Students practice advocacy skills by preparing and presenting both written briefs and oral arguements, which are usually made before a panel of judges. Members of the student board, elected through an intramural competition held each Fall, compete in national and regional competitions with teams from other law schools. Successful completion of a student's first academic year of membership on the board, including participation in the intramural competition used to select members, entitles the student to one credit. One additional credit may be earned for participation as a competitor or competition editor in an interscholastic Moot Court competition. A maximum of three credits may be gained for all participation in Moot Court Board activities. Moot Court Board credits are granted with the grade of "pass". Any award or credit is based in part on the student's own preparation of a written memorandum or brief assented to by a faculty member and is subject to the faculty member's evaluation and review of the student's entire work in the competition.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 526. Moot Court II.1-2 Credits.

Participation on the Moot Court Board allows students to build upon the writing and advocacy skills developed in the first year Legal Skills Program. Students practice advocacy skills by preparing and presenting both written briefs and oral arguements, which are usually made before a panel of judges. Members of the Student Board, elected through an intramural competition held each Fall, compete in national and regional competitions with teams from other law schools. Successful completion of a student's first year of membership on the board, including participation in the intramural competition used to select members, entitles a student to one credit. One additional credit may be earned for participation as a competitor or competition editor in an interscholastic Moot Court competition. A maximum of three credits may be gained for all participation in Moot Court activities. Moot Court Board credits are granted with the the grade of "pass". Any award of credit is based in part on the student's own preparation of a written memorandum or brief assented to by a faculty member, and is subject to the faculty member's evaluation and review of the student's entire work in the competition.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 527. Corporate Counsel Externship.2-5 Credits.

Students work in the legal departments of area corporations and membership organizations. One two-hour class every other week.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 528. Moot Court III.1 Credit.

Participation on the Moot Court Board allows students to build on the writing and advocacy skills developed in the first year Legal Skills Program. Students practice advocacy skills by presenting both written briefs and oral arguements, which are usually made before a panel of judges. Members of the Student Board, elected through an intramural competition held each Fall, compete in national and regional competitions with teams from other law schools. Successful completion of a student's first academic year of membership on the board, including participation in the competition used to elect members, entitles the student to one credit. One additional credit may be earned for participation as a competitor or competition editor during interscholastic Moot Court competition. A maximum of three credits may be gained for all participation in Moot Court activities. Moot Court Board credits are granted with the grade of "pass". Any award of credit is based in part on the student's own preparation of a written memorandum or brief assented to by a faculty member and is subject to the faculty member's evaluation and review of the student's entire work in the competition.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 530. Probate Law Journal I.1-3 Credits.

The Quinnipiac Probate Law Journal is a student-edited law journal covering developments in probate law and practice. The Journal includes scholarly articles, as well as noteworthy judicial opinions from probate courts throughout the nation. Membership on the Journal is based on academic achievement and/or participation in an annual write-on competition. Successful completion of all requirements entitles a student to four academic credits and credit for the substantial paper component of the Advanced Writing Requirement.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 531. Probate Law Journal II W.1-2 Credits.

The Quinnipiac Probate Law Journal is a student-edited law journal covering developments in probate law and practice. The Journal includes scholarly articles, as well as noteworthy judicial opinions from probate courts throughout the nation. Membership on the Journal is based on academic achievement and/or participation in an annual write-on competition. Successful completion of all requirements entitles a student to four academic credits and credit for the substantial paper component of the Advanced Writing Requirement.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 539. Intro. to Dispute Res. in Healthcare.2-3 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the potential role of ADR in resolving some of the most compelling disputes in the healthcare field. As this course will emphasize both conflict resolution skill-building and content-based learning, by the end of the course, students will be familiar with a spectrum of dispute resolution processes and context specific strategies for resolving conflicts in different healthcare settings. This is an intermediate course designed for students who have some familiarity with alternative dispute resolution and/or healthcare law.

LAWS 540. Family & Juvenile Law Externship.2-5 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 311;

LAWS 541. Fam&Juv. Law Seminar.1 Credit.

LAWS 542. Healthcare Industry Regulation & Control.3 Credits.

This course will analyze and discuss the statutory, regulatory and private contract provisions that govern the delivery of healthcare by licensed providers.

LAWS 544. Advanced Health Law, SW.2 Credits.

This is a limited enrollment course, open only to students who have taken the introductory Health Law course (LAWS 345) or who have professional training in medicine, nursing, or a related field. Students will be expected to do independent research in an area of health law to be approved by the instructor. In addition to producing a paper of substantial legal scholarship, students will be required to make class presentations on their research. This course is cross listed for the Health Care Compliance Certificate (offered in conjunction with the School of Business) and the Scholarly Reflection and Concentration/Capstone Course at the Frank H. Netter School of Medicine. [Prerequisite: Health Law ([LAWS 345)] (2 credits)

Prerequisites: LAWS 345

LAWS 545. Healthcare and Hospital Administration.2 Credits.

This introductory course in healthcare and hospital administration will introduce students to the field of hospital administration and healthcare management.It will give an overview of contemporary issues relating to government healthcare regulation, hospital administration,medical staff credentialing, financial reimbursement,personnel management and federal efforts for universal healthcare coverage.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 547. Civ.&Pol Rts-1st Amendment.2 Credits.

This course is a study of the law of the individual liberties and civil rights, with emphasis on the First Amendment speech, press, and religion causes.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 110;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 549. Bioethics.3 Credits.

This course will cover the legal and ethical issues involved in such areas as human experimentation, novel means of reproduction made possible by advanced technology, medical treatment of patients who are incompetent to consent, genetic screening and counseling, abortion, the treatment of defective newborns, the definition of death, organ transplantation, AIDS, and drug and alcohol addiction.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 551. Federal Criminal Law.2 Credits.

This course examines Federal Substantive Criminal Law. It includes a re-examination of the constitutional authority of the national government; judicial, legislative and administrative approaches to limiting federal authority; and the state-federal relationship in the criminal process. The bulk of class time will be devoted to close examination of several statutory offenses, such as racketeering, mail fraud, and conspiracy. The course also focuses on ethical and policy issues confronting attorneys involved in the Federal Criminal Justice System.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 110; Take LAWS 113;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 553. Law Practice Management.2 Credits.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 564. Poverty Law.2 Credits.

The course examines the problems of poor persons and selected governmental and private efforts to aid them; consumer protection laws; the requirements and procedures regulating eligibility for Welfare Assistance; alternatives to the present system of Welfare payments; Housing Code enforcement; subsidized housing; the role of the poor persons in determining and managing programs designed to assist them; legal representation and counseling of the indigent persons.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 572. Immigrat'n & Natural'n Law.3 Credits.

An introduction to the practice of immigration law, to include the substantive and procedural rights of foreign nationals. Topics will include: the role of US government agencies charged with administering immigration, admission and entry to the United States, and removal from the United States. Ethical issues unique to the practice of immigration law will be highlighted throughout the course.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 574. Adv. Civil Pro. - CT Practice.2-3 Credits.

This course deals with selected problems in civil procedure in the state of Connecticut of current or continuing interest.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 579. Advanced Externship Seminar.1 Credit.

LAWS 580. Taxation of Bus. Enterprises.4 Credits.

This is a study of basic concepts of federal income taxation of partnerships, traditional corporations, and subcharter S corporations.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 581. Tax Research - S,W.2 Credits.

With approval of a faculty member, tax students may select a topic for extensive research culminating in a paper of publishable quality.

Prerequisites: Take LAWS 305;
Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 584. Irish Legal System.2 Credits.

The Irish Legal system shares a common background and history with the American and Eglish systems, but it also has it s own. This course will examine some of the history of the Irish legal system, its courts, procedures, and include an introduction to some of the substantive law of Ireland.

LAWS 587. Disability Law.2 Credits.

This course focuses on The Americans with Disabilities Act, including its sections prohibiting disability discrimination in the workplace, in public accommodations and in state and local government services. The course explores the key elements of the law, including the definition of disability, reasonable accommodations, undue hardship and the direct threat defense. The course also examines the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Federal Rehabilitation Act.

LAWS 588. Health Law Journal I.1-2 Credits.

The Quinnipiac Health Law Journal is a student-edited law journal. Each issue contains a collection of scholarly articles involving health law issues written by students of Quinnipiac University School of Law and/or legal scholars in the Health Law profession. Membership on the Journal is based on academic achievement and/or participation in an annual write-on competition. Successful completion of all requirements entitles a student to four academic credits and credit for the substantial paper component of the Advanced Writing Requirement.

LAWS 589. Health Law Journal II.1-2 Credits.

The Quinnipiac Health Law Journal is a student-edited law journal. Each issue contains a collection of scholarly articles involving health law issues written by students of Quinnipiac University School of Law and/or legal scholars in the Health Law profession. Membership on the Journal is based on academic achievement and/or participation in an annual write-on competition. Successful completion of all requirements entitles a student to four academic credits and credit for the substantial paper component of the Advanced Writing Requirement.

LAWS 590. Symposium: the Law of Politics & Media.2 Credits.

This is a Constitutional Law course that focuses on the role of attorneys in the political process. We will spend time studying the power of the executive branch; political cover-ups; lying to Congress; impeachment; political deal making; campaign finance; the role of the press; and voting rights.

LAWS 596. Franchise Law.3 Credits.

The course covers selected topics in franchise law.

LAWS 599. Intro to Representing Clients.2 Credits.

This course is designed to prepare students for individual client representation and work in other practice settings. IRC students explore the lawyer's role, and develop interviewing, counseling, and negotiation skills by representing each other in mock cases.

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 600. Law and Gender.2 Credits.

Offered: All

LAWS 601. Managed Health Care.2 Credits.

Managed Health Care This course will examine issues of current interest in the area of managed care. Topics covered may include formation of integrated health care delivery systems and the rights and obligations of third-party payors, providers, and patients. (2 credits)

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 602. Law and Forensic Science.2 Credits.

Forensic scientific evidence is frequently the subject of court challenges and public controversy. Critics question the methods forensic scientists employ and the validity of their conclusions, while forensic experts claim that their work is misrepresented or misunderstood. During this course, experts in DNA, fingerprints, pattern interpretation, and other forensic disciplines will present the basic principles of their fields, accepted interpretation models, and the scientific limits of what experts can reasonably conclude. The course will also explore, through case examples and discussion, various strategies for using forensic evidence to support or challenge the reliability of factual findings.

LAWS 604. Medical Malpractice.2 Credits.

This course will cover the principles of medical negligence and their application in selected cases. Specific topics will include the physician's duty to patients, the standard of care in medical malpractice actions, causation in law and medicine, the standard of proof, the damages obtainable, medical records and other evidence used to prove malpractice, the use of expert testimony, and the physician patient privilege. Other areas to be discussed are hospital liability, the role of insurance, recent statutory reforms, and alternatives to litigation. (2 or 3 credits)

LAWS 607. Legal Services Externship.2-5 Credits.

LAWS 608. Legal Services Seminar.1 Credit.

LAWS 609. Externship Seminar.1 Credit.

LAWS 611. Advanced Clinic.1-6 Credits.

Some students who have completed a clinic semester will be invited to continue working in the clinic on advanced matters. May or may not have formal classroom component, at the professor's discretion. (By arrangement with clinic faculty; 1 to 6 credits)

Offered: Every year, All

LAWS 612. Advanced Tax Clinic.2-5 Credits.

Some students who have completed a clinic semester will be invited to continue working in the clinic on advanced matters. May or may not have formal classroom component, at the professor's discretion.

Prerequisites: take LAWS 295

LAWS 620. Electronic Discovery & Digital Evidence.2 Credits.

This course will examine the procedural and evidentiary issues that arise in an increasingly digital world. We will focus on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Federal Rules of Evidence as they apply to the retention, storage, production in pre-trial discovery, and admissibility at trial of electronically stored information. The course will be interactive and afford students the opportunity to utilize written and oral advocacy skills in applying the rules of procedure, evidence and ethics to civil and criminal case scenarios. The course will also involve a research paper and no final exam. No special knowledge about computers is needed. Pre or Co-Requisite: Evidence

Corequisites: Take LAWS 311

LAWS 625. Health Information Privacy and Security.2-3 Credits.

Health information privacy and security are critical components of the current health care culture and health law environment. This course provides an introduction to these privacy and security concerns and surveys key issues including electronic health records, the exchange of health information, privacy breaches, and the globalization of health care and clinical research. The course will discuss the interplay of federal health care privacy law with state privacy law with a focus on the federal Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). The course will also present an overview of international healthcare privacy considerations in cross-border healthcare-related transactions, including tele-health consultations and global research. In addition to reviewing the legal authority, the course will feature sample case studies for analysis and discussion and will emphasize creative, critical thinking about health care privacy and security law in the context of the "real world.

LAWS 626. Evening Clinic: Legal Ethics Project.1 Credit.

LAWS 627. Evening Clinic: Veterans Law Project.1-4 Credits.

LAWS 628. Estate Planning & Drafting.2 Credits.

Estate Planning & Drafting

Corequisites: LAWS 307

LAWS 629. Government Contracts Law.2 Credits.

This course will examine the legal issues pertaining to the United States Government's contracting activities. Students will receive an overview of the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) and underlying statutes such as the Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) and Contract Disputes Act of 1978 (CDA). The course will give students the opportunity to explore the unique aspects of Government contract formation, administration, and litigation in both the private and public sectors.

LAWS 631. Financial Planning: Principles and Taxat.2-3 Credits.

This course considers major topics in the field of financial planning, including the role of various types of financial advisors, asset management and investments, retirement planning, insurance and income tax planning. Through various written projects, students will explore selected aspects of the financial planning process. Consideration will be given to the tax consequences of various planning techniques. (Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation)

LAWS 633. Intellectual Property in Health Care.2 Credits.

Intellectual property rights are important for innovation in health care and public health, and are one factor in determining access to medicines and medical procedures. The course will focus on various types of intellectual property in these areas, including patents relating to pharmaceuticals, medicines, medical devices, and surgical procedures. Related topics to be discussed include patentable subject matter and trade secrets as they relate to healthcare IP, as well as ownership, licensing, and other transactions involving such intellectual property. Policy considerations including the importance and effectiveness of intellectual property regimes and other incentive and funding mechanisms that stimulate research and the creation of new medicines and other products that improve health will also be discussed.

LAWS 634. Int'l Human Rights Law & Trans. Justice.1-2 Credits.

International Human Rights Law & Transitional Justice This year-long course will explore the tension between justice and peace; and, in the transitional justice context, the tension between justice and mercy. Topics may include, among others: the concept of human rights, guaranteeing human rights by treaty, human rights & foreign policy, transitional justice, truth & reconciliation processes, and women, peace & security. The course culminates, for students who are able to attend, in making a presentation at the annual Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates, which meets annually to "engage in dialogue, discussion, and debate about current issues and challenges, promote significant international political and social campaigns, issue statements, conceive and create new initiatives, and hopefully send messages of inspiration and wisdom to the entire world." Since its inception in 1999, the Summit has convened in, among other cities, Rome, Hiroshima, Warsaw, Berlin, Paris, Barcelona, and, most recently, in Bogotá. The course will prepare the students for their presentation by providing an education in the legal texts and historical readings relevant to each year's Summit. (2 or 3 credits: 1 each in the fall and spring, plus 1 credit for attending the Summit, earned in the semester in which the Summit occurs.)

LAWS 635. Negotiable Instruments & Elec. Payments.2-4 Credits.

Negotiable Instruments and Electronic Payments (LAWS 635) Introduction to Article 3 (Negotiable Instruments), Article 4 (Bank Deposits and Collection), and Article 4A (Fund Transfers) of the Uniform Commercial Code. In addition, the course will address various federal statutes, such as the Check 21 Act and the Electronic Funds Transfer Act. (3 or 4 credits)

LAWS 636. Sentencing, Prisons, and Reentry.2 Credits.

This seminar will explore policies and procedures relating to the "back end" of the criminal justice system (i.e., what occurs after a determination of guilt). The course will cover topics relating to criminal sentencing, including sentencing guidelines, mandatory minimums, and constitutional challenges to sentences. We will consider laws and policies relating to incarceration, such as prison conditions, solitary confinement, access to health care for prisoners, and the Prison Rape Elimination Act. Finally, we will examine the "collateral consequences" of criminal convictions and the challenges individuals face reentering communities after incarceration. These questions are pressing given the size of our country's incarcerated population - with more than 2.2 million people incarcerated in America's prisons and jails, we have more prisoners per capita than any other country in the world. (2 credits)

LAWS 638. Corporate Counsel.2 Credits.

LAWS 650. Cybersecurity.2 Credits.

As the Internet continues to expand throughout society and in our daily lives, cybersecurity, privacy, and anonymity legal issues are becoming increasingly important. Students in this course will study both U.S. and European data protection and privacy regimes, with an emphasis on U.S. law. Students will explore the legal frameworks of U.S. privacy laws as they apply to specific industries and types of information holders and users, analyzing relevant statutes, civil litigation, and FTC enforcement actions as well as as actual contract language (i.e., online privacy policies and data protection language). Students will engage with the most current cases and will work on practical legal issues relevant to corporate clients. The objective of this course is for students to develop a broad foundation and skill set in this rapidly evovling area of law.

LAWS 676. Anatomy for Lawyers.2 Credits.

An understanding of basic human anatomy is a key component of any legal action involving damage or injury to an individual. The purpose of this course is to provide a general overview of basic human anatomy. The intent of the class is to familiarize lawyers with basic human anatomy and some associated physiology. Plaintiff and defense attorneys who pursue personal injury and workers compensation cases focus mostly on joints and limb function, such as the ankle, hip and shoulder and their functional ability, and also on the spine (cervical and lumbar) and the overall functional ability. However, there are other areas of law such as medical malpractice, environmental/toxic tort, pharmaceutical/products, patent, mass tort, Criminal law and other areas of Healthcare law which all deal with basic or different aspects of anatomy and physiology. The areas of law in which a basic knowledge of human anatomy and physiology apply are substantial. The course will give a basic general understanding of human anatomy and physiology, and discuss common injuries and damage which will give attorneys a better understanding when reviewing medical records and evaluating cases and dealing with experts and expert testimony.

LAWS 777. Review.1 Credit.