History (HS)

HS 500. Special Topics in History.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

HS 501. Special Topics.4 Credits.

Offered: As needed

HS 524. Approaches to World History.4 Credits.

This course examines various approaches to, and interpretations of, world history. The course has a topical format, with the specific focus shifting depending on contemporary global issues, recent interpretive innovations in the field and the interests of the instructor and the students. A specific goal of the class is to offer future teachers approaches to modern world history that will aid them in lesson planning and development. More generally, the goals of this class include the improvement of written and oral communication skills and the development of critical thinking skills through the examination of primary and secondary sources and the construction of interpretative arguments.

Offered: Every year, All

HS 525. History of the Atlantic World From the 15th to 19th Century.4 Credits.

This course explores the world made by contact, exchanges and clashes between European, Africans and Americans between the early 1400s to the late 1800s. The key assertion underpinning this course is that, despite social and cultural distinctiveness, Europe, Africa and America were interconnected, and are best understood as a "regional system" where each part is most intelligible by investigating its relationship to the whole. Using a thematic and chronological approach, this course explores critical themes that not only link these sub-regions but also give them distinctive historical character. Global trade networks, migration and settlement, colonization and imperialism, cultural and epidemiological transmission, race and gender relations and demographic reconfigurations are among the topics investigated in this course.

Offered: Every other year, All

HS 526. Approaches to U.S. History.4 Credits.

This course examines various approaches to, and interpretations of, U.S. history. The course focuses on a specific topic in American history and varies according to contemporary global issues, recent historiographical shifts, methodological innovations and/or the interests of the instructor and the students. One goal of this class is to offer future and present primary, middle and secondary schoolteachers approaches to U.S. history that may aid them in content and lesson planning. This course also uses typical historical methods, including the examination of primary and secondary sources and the construction of interpretative arguments, to develop written and oral communication skills as well as critical thinking.

Offered: Every year, Spring

HS 527. Approaches to Modern European History.4 Credits.

This course examines modern European history from a variety of standpoints. The course has a topical format--the specific focus shifts depending on contemporary issues and events, recent interpretive innovations in European history and the interests of the instructor and the students. In addition to deepening their knowledge of recent European history, the course also aids future teachers in developing rigorous and historically rich lessons for their students.

Offered: Every year, Fall

HS 563. Dynamics of American Social Structure.3 Credits.

This course considers continuity and change in values/beliefs and group structure as documented in the life of one American community. The relation between life chances and the lifestyle of minority groups at different periods and the responses of the dominant group are analyzed; the social, economic and political factors that shape the opportunity structure and the struggle for equality also are considered.

Offered: As needed, All

HS 564. Topics in East Asian History.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to Chinese and Japanese civilizations from the dawn of history to the end of the 20th century. The course stresses the artistic, cultural and intellectual traditions that evolved in East Asia.

Offered: As needed

HS 565. Topics in Geography for the 21st Century (GP 565).3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the general structure and methodology of geographic study in a cultural setting. The interaction among environments, populations, ways of life and locations are studied in a coherent, organized way. The distribution of people, food, energy and resources are analyzed, and there is an assessment of how to evaluate environmental potential, to deal with other peoples, to maximize available opportunities, and to determine which course of action to follow for progress and growth.

Offered: As needed

HS 566. Chinese Civilization.3 Credits.

In this introduction to Chinese civilization from the dawn of Chinese history until the end of the dynastic cycle in 1911, students are first introduced to the geography of China. Next, they learn about the evolution of the Chinese written language. Following this, the class considers the three ways of thought-Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism-which provided the ideological "glue" that held traditional Chinese society together. Last, students explore the worlds of Chinese literature, art and architecture.

Offered: As needed, All

HS 567. Popular Culture in American History.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed, All

HS 599. Independent Study.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed, All