Special Education (SPED)

SPED 545. Introduction to the Exceptional Child.4 Credits.

This course provides students with a broad overview of exceptional learners. It is a basic overview/survey of all areas and categories of special education. The purpose is to provide an introduction to students with exceptionalities for education as well as noneducation majors. Target subject areas include: knowledge of categorical labels, educational law, program planning and terminology used in the field.

Offered: Every year, January and Summer

SPED 552. Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom.3 Credits.

Treatment of exceptional individuals throughout history and the importance of societal values regarding their differences form the basis for students' understanding of special education from its inception to current practices. Topics of discussion include: history and philosophy, laws, guidelines and procedures related to providing special education; the needs of students with exceptionalities, including giftedness; the particular needs of students for whom English is a second language; and instructional considerations for students with exceptionalities in inclusive settings. From a philosophic perspective, students learn skills to include children with exceptionalities in their elementary classrooms.

Corequisites: Take SPED 452L;
Offered: Every year, Fall and Summer

SPED 565. Specific Learning Disabilities: Identification, Instruction and Assessment (LD).4 Credits.

In this course, we have the opportunity to build our knowledge of specific learning disabilities. Through collaboration that recognizes the student and family as an important part of the team, we also want to share the supports and strategies that are successful in school so that there is a continuum of strategies that are practiced not just learned. We already understand the importance of responding to the learning needs of these students in a positive way to help them access the curriculum successfully. In this course, we will incorporate tools such as simulations and case studies to understand the challenges and overlaps these SLDs present. Our course will examine the role of SRBI in identification. We will also examine questions such as: what makes these disabilities so misdiagnosed/overlooked; which if any are inherited/preventable; are there hidden gifts/talents being overshadowed by LDs; how can including the family in our collaborative efforts benefit the student; how can we identify key strategies to support these students emotionally as well as academically?

Offered: Every year, January and Summer

SPED 566. Autism Spectrum Disorders.4 Credits.

Educational practitioners develop a knowledge base of methods for working with students diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and associated communication disorders. Focus is on the identification of students, as well as the program planning based on instructional strategies in the areas of academic, behavioral, social-emotional and communication.

Offered: Every year, January and Summer

SPED 567. Independent Research in Special Education.1 Credit.

This course focuses on research in the field of special education as it relates to students in the educational setting. The research project should include the application of evidence-based practice, the role of families in the educational process and the effects of the disability on lifelong learning. Specific topics/projects must meet with faculty approval.

Prerequisites: Take SPED 565 or SPED 566;
Offered: Every year, Spring

SPED 568. Assessment/Program Planning and Evaluation of Children With Special Needs.3 Credits.

In this course, candidates prepare to administer, score and interpret a wide range of criterion referenced, norm referenced and curriculum-based measurements. Candidates utilize information to identify students with specific learning disabilities, make valid recommendations for programming, design appropriate IEP goals and objectives based on the results, and share information with parents and other professionals.

Offered: Every year

SPED 570. Special Education Law.3 Credits.

This course focuses on current and relevant federal and state legislation in the field of special education. Special attention is paid to the interplay of services and protections provided by IDEA, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). In addition, candidates examine the materials to understand the Every Student Success Act (ESSA) that was recently signed into law. Candidates learn how the law affects the planning and delivery of services to children, adolescents and adults with special needs from birth through adulthood. Candidates learn to interpret case law as well as statutes and other legal memoranda that apply to the rights and protections afforded to people with special needs.

Offered: Every year

SPED 571. Emotional and Behavioral Disorder Identification, Management, and Assessment.3 Credits.

This course examines social-emotional-behavioral functioning in the educational setting. Methods of identification, assessment and instructional planning for students with social-emotional-behavioral disorders are addressed in depth. Comprehensive coverage of behavior management, discipline models and building systems of support are examined and discussed. In this way, behavior and/or different learning needs are understood, modifications and supports are put in place and the student is actively engaged in practicing them. This student-centered method results in positive outcomes across the span of the student's life because the student learns and internalizes successful strategies that work consistently.

Offered: Every year

SPED 572. Educating Young Children with Special Needs.3 Credits.

The needs of the young child with disabilities are explored through an examination of social, adaptive, environmental and family characteristics. Candidates learn how to assess children and provide a developmentally appropriate curriculum. The differences between IEPs and IFSP are a focal point, as well as the importance of working with families and professionals in birth to three programs, preschool programs, and kindergarten through grade 2 classrooms. Community services for the young special needs child also are discussed.

Offered: Every year

SPED 573. Reading Disorders: Assessment, Planning and Instruction.3 Credits.

This course provides candidates with the knowledge and skills needed to provide appropriate evaluation, program planning and educational experiences for students with reading disorders, including Dyslexia. Specifically, reading assessments, diagnosis of reading disorders, IEP goals/objectives and program recommendations are explored and discussed. Reading instruction at the intervention and special education identification levels are discussed to ensure students' ability to plan educational programming for students including those with Dyslexia. Further, instructional strategies to support students with reading disabilities who are included in the regular education setting are emphasized. Various methodologies to support students with Dyslexia as they access the regular education curriculum and instruction are included.

Offered: Every year

SPED 574. Understanding and Teaching Students with Intellectual Disabilities.3 Credits.

This course provides candidates with the information necessary to provide appropriate educational experiences for students with low incidence disabilities, including intellectual impairments, physical impairments and those with multiple areas of impairment. The focus is on promoting participation in the school, home and community through developing appropriate transition goals. Emphasis is placed on the use and effectiveness of assistive technologies in working with these students.

Offered: Every year

SPED 575. Working with Gifted and Talented Students.3 Credits.

This course focuses on characteristics of students identified as "gifted" and "talented." Attention also is paid to those who are "twice exceptional." Candidates explore the early development of these children as well as the ways in which their gifts may affect their relationships with their siblings and families. Areas of study include identification, curriculum design and understanding how to provide for their unique social and emotional development, as well as their academic achievement.

Offered: Every year

SPED 576. Implementing Assistive Technology and Screen Capture Tools.3 Credits.

This course examines the rapidly changing landscape of assistive technologies for students with special needs. A focus is on matching specific features of assistive technology devices in the areas of communication, reading and writing to the needs of individual students. Candidates also explore tools such as TechSmith Relay to capture and deliver materials to students who are forced to miss school due to serious health issues.

Offered: Every year

SPED 577. Specific Learning Disabilities: Identification, Instruction and Assessment.3 Credits.

In this course, students have the opportunity to build upon their knowledge of specific learning disabilities. The course incorporates tools such as simulation and case studies to understand the challenges and overlaps these SLDs present. Students examine the role of SRBI in identification. They also examine questions such as: what makes these disabilities so misdiagnosed/overlooked; which if any are inherited/preventable; are there hidden gifts/talents being overshadowed by LDs; how can including the family in our collaborative efforts benefit the student; how can we identify key strategies to support these students emotionally as well as academically?

Offered: Every year

SPED 579. Practicum in Special Education I.3 Credits.

This is the first of two separate 3-credit practicums designed to provide each candidate with professional practice and authentic experiences working with students identified as having special needs. Candidates have an opportunity to observe, plan, instruct and assess students in at least two different categories of special needs while working side by side with certified special education teachers under the guidance of a Quinnipiac University supervisor. The candidate, the onsite cooperating teacher and the university supervisor meet at the start of each practicum to outline the expectations, standards and activities necessary to successfully complete each practicum. Additional meetings are arranged as needed. Candidates keep a log of their activities and hours as well as a journal reflecting on their experiences. All data collected throughout each practicum is compiled in an e-portfolio.

Offered: Every year

SPED 580. Practicum in Special Education II.3 Credits.

This is the second of two separate 3-credit practicums designed to provide each candidate with professional practice and authentic experiences working with students identified as having special needs. Candidates have an opportunity to observe, plan, instruct and assess students in a different category of special needs than in SPED 579 while working side by side with certified special education teachers. The candidate, the onsite cooperating teacher and the university supervisor meet at the start of each practicum to outline the expectations, standards and activities necessary to successfully complete each practicum. Additional meetings are arranged as needed. Candidates keep a log of their activities and hours as well as a journal reflecting on their experiences. All data collected throughout each practicum is compiled in an e-portfolio.

Offered: Every year

SPED 581. Research in Special Education.3 Credits.

Candidates submit a proposal for research based on an area of interest in special education. Upon approval of their proposal, they conduct research, collect data and present their findings in a thesis as a culminating requirement for their MS in Special Education. This course is required only for candidates enrolled in the MS in SPED who are not seeking cross-endorsement in Comprehensive Special Education. Prerequisite: Completion of 27 credits in SPED course work.

Offered: Every year