Accounting (AC)

AC 613. Financial Statement Analysis.3 Credits.

In this course, students gain an additional understanding of the accounting numbers that appear in financial statements for accounts such as receivables, deferred revenue and leases. Topics include revenue recognition, income-statement geography, short-term liquidity, working-capital efficiencies, solvency, cash-flow analysis and quarterly reporting. Also considered are the many reporting choices given to firms and how their use of different accounting methods for similar economic events creates challenges for analysts. Instances of questionable financial reporting and strategies that can aid in their discovery are addressed. Firms' filings of financial statements and note disclosures with the SEC on Form 10-K are examined throughout the course. In addition, the usefulness of governance disclosures contained within firms' proxy statements is considered. Students cannot receive credit for both AC 613 and AC 640.

Offered: Every year, Fall

AC 620. Financial and Managerial Accounting for Decision Making (MBA 620).3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the use of accounting information for decision making in organizations. Topics include reporting and analysis of financial statement information and the use of managerial decision-making tools to support planning and control. Students can receive credit for either AC 620 or MBA 620 but not both.

Offered: Every year, All

AC 635. Advanced Financial Accounting.3 Credits.

This course provides an in-depth study of accounting principles and analysis of problems for multi-corporate entities, focusing on business combinations, consolidation concepts and procedures, and intercompany transfers. Includes the accounting for multinational entities, and segmental, interim and SEC reporting. Students learn standard-related research skills and complete several research cases using the FASB codification database.

Prerequisites: Take one undergraduate intermediate accounting course.
Offered: Every year, Fall

AC 640. Financial Statement Analysis.3 Credits.

In this course, students gain additional understanding of how firms communicate through financial statements. They learn how to use financial statement analysis in strategic decision making. Students will learn to interpret financial statements, analyze cash flows, and make judgments about the quality of earnings, assets and liabilities. Students cannot receive credit for both AC 613 and AC 640.

Prerequisites: Take one undergraduate intermediate accounting course.
Offered: Every year, Fall

AC 645. Information Assurance.3 Credits.

This course is designed to broaden and deepen students' conceptual and technical understanding of the CPA's attest function, provide students with a framework for analyzing contemporary auditing and assurance issues, and help students understand the complete audit of a client. This course utilizes case studies to study current issues and practices associated with information assurance services.

Prerequisites: Take one undergraduate accounting auditing course.
Offered: Every year, Fall

AC 650. Advanced Accounting Information Systems.3 Credits.

This course provides students with in-depth knowledge of the role accounting information systems play in a business environment. Using a combination of course delivery methods, this course emphasizes information, communication and networking technology--in the context of business processes, transaction cycles and internal control structures--that enhances the production of accurate and reliable accounting information.

Prerequisites: Take one undergraduate accounting information systems course.
Offered: Every year, Fall

AC 660. Strategic Management Control Systems.3 Credits.

This course provides students with broad exposure to the ways in which management control systems and management accounting information are used to support various organizations' strategies. The course involves both textbook/problem-based and case-based learning methods to cover issues related to strategy selection, performance evaluation, organizational profitability, customer profitability, organizational structure, and employee compensation. Special emphasis is placed on ethical considerations, not-for-profit organizations and sustainability issues.

Offered: Every year, Spring

AC 665. Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination.3 Credits.

This course provides a survey of forensic accounting and fraud examination. Students gain an understanding of different types of fraud, sources of evidence and analysis of fraud schemes highlighting the skills needed to identify and investigate fraudulent accounting allegations. This course employs case studies to study current issues, practices and techniques related to fraud examination and forensic accounting services.

Offered: Every year, Spring

AC 670. Advanced Business Law, Regulation, Ethics and Reporting Environments.3 Credits.

In this course, students learn to identify and resolve complex legal and ethical issues typically encountered by businesses. Emphasis is placed on business law topics relevant to the accounting profession. Topics may include agency law and worker classification, formation and performance of contracts, debtors, creditors, guarantors, secured transactions, bankruptcy, federal securities regulation, formation, operation, termination of business entities, and liability of accountants.

Prerequisites: Take one undergraduate business law course.
Offered: Every year, Spring

AC 675. Governmental and Not-For-Profit Accounting.3 Credits.

This course provides an in-depth study of the financial reporting concepts and standards applicable to state and local governments, and not-for-profit entities such as colleges and universities, health care entities, and voluntary health and welfare organizations. It emphasizes the differences between governmental and private sector (for-profit) accounting. Particular attention is placed on the preparation and analysis of governmental financial reports.

Prerequisites: Take one undergraduate intermediate accounting course.
Offered: Every year, Spring

AC 680. Advanced Federal Income Taxation and Tax Research.3 Credits.

In this course, students gain the knowledge and understanding of concepts and laws relating to federal income taxation of individuals and entities. In addition, students learn how to apply the knowledge and skills gained from this course in professional tax preparation and tax advisory positions. Some of the topics covered include federal tax process, procedures, accounting and planning, as well as federal taxation of individuals, entities (C corporations, S corporations, partnerships, trusts and estates and exempt organizations) and taxation of property transactions.

Offered: Every year, Spring

AC 688. Seminar in Accounting.3 Credits.

Permission of the MBA director and School of Business dean is required.

Offered: As needed

AC 689. Independent Study - Accounting.3 Credits.

Independent research under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires approval by the faculty member, chair of the department, and dean of the School of Business.

Offered: As needed