Criminal Justice (CJ)

CJ 101. Crime and Society.3 Credits.

This course examines crime as a cultural phenomenon and as a problem of social control. Topics include the nature of law, characteristics of the criminal justice system, types of crime, as well as the critical evaluation of theories of crime.

Offered: Every year, All

CJ 200. Special Topics.3 Credits.

A variety of special topics courses are periodically offered.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: As needed

CJ 205. From College to Career (SO/GT 205).1 Credit.

This course introduces sociology, gerontology and criminal justice majors to the preprofessional skills and knowledge they need to practice prior to obtaining their internship. Students are introduced to practical skills that will benefit them throughout their professional careers ranging from self-reflection to resume writing and email etiquette. Students meet regularly to discuss the breadth of potential careers in sociology, criminal justice and gerontology through interaction with departmental faculty and practitioners in the field. For criminal justice majors only. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Prerequisites: Take CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring

CJ 232. Women in the Criminal Justice System (SO/WS 232).3 Credits.

This course examines the changing patterns of women's criminality, the experiences of women who are processed as crime victims, and the evolution of women's role in law, law enforcement and corrections.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 240. Organized Crime.3 Credits.

This course considers the history of organized crime, its functions in distributing goods and services, in establishing order and disorder, its role in the integration of marginal ethnic groups, and the response of law enforcement and government agencies.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring

CJ 241. Police and Policing.3 Credits.

This course considers the history and development of functions in policing. Issues and controversies in policing such as: training, police ideology, police management styles, the development of a working police "personality," the appropriate use of force, racial profiling, police corruption, patrol, professionalism, due process and vocational considerations are examined.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, All

CJ 243. Investigative Techniques.3 Credits.

This course provides students with knowledge of basic concepts of case and crime scene investigation; scene and investigative personnel management; nature of investigative personnel roles; steps in the processing of scenes and evidence; methods of documentation; general and specialized techniques for the recognition, identification and individualization of evidence; sources of investigative information; interview techniques; reconstruction of events; and legal and ethical considerations during criminal investigations. For majors only.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CJ 250. Youth Crime (SO 250).3 Credits.

This course deals with youth crime as distinct from adult offending. Students examine the development of the juvenile delinquency concept and justification for classifying juvenile offenders as separate from adults. Factors contributing to the onset of juvenile delinquency and relevant research also are examined. The course considers development and current functions of the juvenile justice system, paying particular attention to the challenges justice officials face daily. A range of widely used treatment strategies for dealing with juvenile offenders is examined.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 251. Probation Parole and Community Corrections.3 Credits.

Offenders are sentenced to one of these alternatives to incarceration in order to change or control behavior. Methods of supervision, special goals such as shock probation or parole, electronic and other "high-tech" monitoring, controversies over effectiveness and punitive aspects of these technologies are considered.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring

CJ 253. Sexual Violence.3 Credits.

This course takes a historical perspective on the societal and psychological aspects of sexual violence as it applies to the criminal justice system. It includes an examination of the etiology of sexual abuse as a law enforcement issue and explores the societal impact of sexual violence upon both those who commit violence and those who are the victims of it. The course encourages students to deepen their understanding of the social structural and individual treatment modalities that are employed within the system to decrease sexual violence.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring

CJ 261. Prisons and Jails.3 Credits.

This course covers incarceration in both prisons and jails. Students examine incarceration as a social phenomenon, exploring its connections to political, economic and cultural forces in society. Participants investigate the history of imprisonment, theories of punishment and the (intended and unintended) societal ramifications of incarceration. Topics include prison architecture, social classifications, prison culture and inmate social structure, violence in prison, "Supermax" prisons, rehabilitation and prisoner reentry.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year

CJ 271. Public Order Crimes (SO 271).3 Credits.

Approximately two-thirds of the inmates in U.S. correctional institutions have been found guilty of public order crimes, "moral crimes" or crimes not likely to have a self-identified victim. This course concentrates on crimes associated with such activities as illegitimate gambling, consensual sex and the criminal use and sale of both legal and illegal substances.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 290. Criminal Justice Research Methods.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to social science research methods used in the criminal justice field. Students examine how qualitative and quantitative research methods apply to social science research. The course places particular emphasis on the importance of scientific methods in reaching informed conclusions. Students examine a number of methods commonly used in social science disciplines and learn how to interpret the results of research conducted using these methods. Understanding how social scientists investigate social phenomena allows students to accurately interpret and apply findings from criminal justice research. Students should complete the course by the end of their sophomore year or second year in the major.

Prerequisites: Take CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, All

CJ 299. Independent Study in Criminal Justice.1-6 Credits.

CJ 300. Special Topics.3 Credits.

A variety of advanced special topics courses are periodically offered.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: As needed

CJ 320. Victimology.3 Credits.

Historically, the primary concern of the justice system was the apprehension and punishment of offenders. More recently, however, the needs of crime victims are increasingly recognized both formally and informally in the justice process. This course examines the emergence of victimology as a field of study and the origins and impacts of victim stigma. Students learn about the range of harms crime victims experience and the importance of addressing victim needs throughout the justice process.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring

CJ 330. Perspectives on Violence (SO 330).3 Credits.

This course explores the many ways that violence is viewed in our society. Topics include types of violence, empirical evidence of incidence, characteristics of violent crimes, offender motivation, victim profiles and sociological and theoretical explanations.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 333. Drugs, Alcohol and Society (SO 333).3 Credits.

This analytical discussion-based course explores the use of drugs and alcohol in U.S. society. The emphasis is on drug and alcohol use and abuse as a social phenomenon. Students explore issues such as the relationship of drug use to particular groups in society (age, sex, race/ethnicity); patterns of drug use and abuse; the promotion of drugs by the media; and drug and alcohol abuse in historical perspective. Students also learn about drug categories, drug education, prevention and treatment and about drug laws.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring

CJ 343. Forensic Issues in Law Enforcement.3 Credits.

This course presents an overview of the scientific method and its application to the analysis of physical evidence as it impacts law enforcement investigations. Topics include the study of basic methods of documentation, collection and preservation of physical evidence; general schemes for the analysis of chemical and biological evidence; identification and individualization of firearms, fingerprints, imprints, hairs, fibers, blood and body fluids, paint, drugs and poisons, and other materials associated with crimes. The course material is reinforced through the use of actual case studies, hands-on exercises and class exercises.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 355. Crime and Media (SO 355).3 Credits.

Despite little direct contact with offenders or the criminal justice system, people typically hold strong opinions about crime-related issues. The goal of this course is to understand how media sources shape our attitudes and beliefs about crime and how we "should" respond to it. To this end, participants examine media involvement in constructing the reality of crime and justice and its implications for the justice process.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

CJ 360. Inside-Out Prison Exchange Seminar.3 Credits.

The "Inside-Out" Prison Exchange seminar is part of a national movement giving undergraduate students (outside students) and prisoners (inside students) an opportunity to learn together. This course, being offered to outside students at Quinnipiac and male inside students at a Connecticut state prison, asks students to examine the impact of status upon American life by considering issues of personal and collective voice in communities, variation in access to conventional success opportunities, and the effect of status upon ability to effectively engage in local and national communities. Through application of theoretical perspectives and consideration of practical experience students are exposed to a diversity of material that allows them to more fully examine and understand the complex impact of social status upon American life. Note: this course takes place inside a Connecticut State Prison.

Prerequisites: Instructor discretion.
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 370. Constitution, Ethics and Policing.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the constitutional limitations and ethical considerations that affect police behavior. These include use of force, coercion, entrapment, right to counsel, wiretapping, confessions and exclusionary rule.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 385. Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice Policy.3 Credits.

This senior-level course examines social policy as applied to a selected aspect of the criminal justice field. Senior status in criminal justice major required.

Prerequisites: Take CJ 290.
Offered: Every year, All

CJ 392. Internship in the Community.3 Credits.

For criminal justice majors in their junior or senior year only. Students each complete 120 hours of supervised fieldwork in a community agency along with one hour per week in a classroom setting. Course work and class content include written and oral reflection, focusing on professional issues, along with criminal justice concepts and theory. Successful completion of the course requires adherence to a high standard of professionalism. Students are required to meet with the internship coordinator one semester prior to begin the placement process.

Offered: Every year, All

CJ 394. Advanced Internship in the Community.3 Credits.

This is a second internship available to criminal justice majors in their junior or senior year only. Students complete 135 hours of supervised fieldwork in a community agency along with one hour per week in the advanced internship class. Students build upon the knowledge gained from their first internship experience to deepen their understanding of concepts and theory through extended written and oral reflection. Students also assess their interpersonal strengths and weaknesses in preparation for graduate school and/or future employment. Successful completion of the course requires adherence to a high standard of professionalism. Students are required to meet with the internship coordinator one semester prior to begin the placement process.

Prerequisites: Take CJ 392.
Offered: Every year, All

CJ 399. Independent Study in Criminal Justice.1-6 Credits.

By arrangement with individual instructor. This course addresses the special intellectual interests of a student and focuses on an issue of special or timely importance.

Offered: As needed, All

CJ 499. Independent Study in Criminal Justice.3 Credits.

This course addresses the special intellectual interests of a student or focus on an issue of special or timely importance.

Offered: As needed, All