Gerontology (GT)

GT 200. Biology of Aging (BMS 200).3 Credits.

The aim of the course is to study the specific and primary changes in physiological mechanisms that result in the process of aging. See description for BMS 200.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 101-102 or BIO 150-151 or BMS 117 BMS 162.
Offered: Every year, All

GT 205. From College to Career (SO/CJ 205).1 Credit.

This course introduces sociology, gerontology and criminal justice majors to the preprofessional skills and knowledge they need to practice prior to obtaining their internship. Students also are introduced to practical skills that will benefit them throughout their professional careers ranging from self-reflection to resume writing and email etiquette. Students meet regularly to discuss the breadth of potential careers in sociology, criminal justice and gerontology through interaction with departmental faculty and practitioners in the field. For gerontology majors only. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Offered: Every year, Spring

GT 234. Adult Developmental Psychology (PS 234).3 Credits.

This course considers facts, theory and speculation about adult development and aging. Focus is on physical, cognitive and social development as well as family and career patterns for periods of young, middle and late adulthood.

Prerequisites: Take PS 101.
Offered: Every other year

GT 263. Sociology of Aging (SO 263).3 Credits.

This introduction to gerontology focuses on the myths and realities of aging explored through historic, demographic and sociological analyses of the conditions of elderly people in our society. Students critically examine the diversity of aging experiences in the U.S. The ways in which social and cultural factors enter into the aging process are also considered.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

GT 270. Program Planning and Administration (SO 270).3 Credits.

Program planning and administration of services to the elderly are considered, as well as models of needs identification, the process of problem analysis, styles of leadership and administrative dilemmas, and elements of grant proposal writing.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101.
Offered: Every other year

GT 290. Research Methods (SO 290).3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to social science research methods. Students examine how qualitative and quantitative research methods apply to social science research. The course places particular emphasis on the importance of scientific methods in reaching informed conclusions. Students examine a number of methods commonly used in social science disciplines and learn how to interpret the results of research conducted using these methods. Understanding how social scientists investigate social phenomena allows students to accurately interpret and apply findings from social science research. Students should complete the course by the end of their sophomore year or second year in the major.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101.
Offered: Every year, All

GT 305. Death, Grief and Bereavement (SO 305).3 Credits.

Death is studied from the perspective of social interaction between the dying person, professional caregivers and family members and loved ones. Attitudes and values about death, cultural components of grief, and the function of bereavement are examined. Particular attention is paid to the social organization of "death work" and dying in bureaucratic settings, such as hospitals and nursing homes, as opposed to the non-bureaucratic structure of hospice care.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101.
Offered: Every year, All

GT 311. Introduction to Social Work (SO 311).3 Credits.

The objective of this course is to provide an introduction to the field of social work including historical roots, fundamental principles and fields of practice. The course will emphasize an integrated overview of social work methods, skills, values, ethics and the social service delivery system. Key social work concepts and service delivery systems will be illuminated from micro, mezzo and macro perspectives that reflect past and present relevant issues. Students will develop an introductory understanding of how psychological and social theories influence social work practice with individuals, groups and communities.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101
Offered: Every year, Fall

GT 315. Case Management (SO 315).3 Credits.

Case management is a process used widely throughout health and social services as a means of assessing, planning, coordinating, monitoring and evaluating the services needed to respond to an individual's health and/or service needs to attain the dual goals of quality and cost effective care. Students in gerontology, sociology, psychology, and criminal justice are likely to encounter the various roles or models of case management practice as they pursue careers in human services. This course provides a foundation for case management practice in various social service settings.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring

GT 365. Aging: Problems and Policies (SO 365).3 Credits.

This course considers the social problems associated with aging, particularly in the areas of health, housing, financing and family life and the governmental policies, past, present and future, that deal with these problems.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101.
Offered: As needed

GT 382. Studying Social Issues with Statistics (SO 382).3 Credits.

In this course, students learn basic introductory-level statistics and quantitative reasoning skills necessary for careers in gerontology. Through hands-on application, students learn research design, basic statistical data collection and data analysis. For gerontology majors only, junior or above.

Prerequisites: Take GT 290.
Offered: Every year, Spring

GT 385. Senior Seminar (SO 385).3 Credits.

This senior seminar is designed as the capstone course for students majoring in sociology and gerontology. Students research a sociological or aging-related topic of their choosing and write a thesis based on their work. All senior theses represent a culmination of majors' academic experiences in the department. For gerontology majors only in the senior year.

Prerequisites: Take GT 290.
Offered: Every year, All

GT 392. Internship in the Community (SO 392).3 Credits.

For gerontology majors in their junior or senior year only. Students each complete 120 hours of supervised fieldwork in an agency that serves the elderly, along with one hour per week in a seminar. Course work and seminar content include written and oral reflection focusing on the student's experience. Professional issues, along with academic concepts and theory, are explored in relation to the agency and the community it serves. Successful completion of the course requires adherence to a high standard of professionalism. Students are required to meet with the internship coordinator one semester prior to beginning the placement process.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 GT 205 GT 263.
Offered: Every year, All

GT 394. Advanced Internship in the Community.3 Credits.

This is a required second internship for gerontology majors in their junior or senior year only. Students complete 135 hours of supervised fieldwork in a community agency that serves the elderly along with one hour per week in the advanced internship class. Students build upon the knowledge gained from their first internship experience to deepen their understanding of concepts and theory through extended written and oral reflection. Students also assess their interpersonal strengths and weaknesses in preparation for graduate school and/or future employment. Successful completion of the course requires adherence to a high standard of professionalism. Students are required to meet with the internship coordinator one semester prior to begin the placement process.

Prerequisites: Take GT 392.
Offered: Every year, All