Gerontology (GT)

GT 200. Biology of Aging (BMS 200).3 Credits.

The aim of the course is to study the specific and primary changes in physiological mechanisms that result in the process of aging. See description for BMS 200.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 101-102 or BIO 150-151 or BMS 117 BMS 162;
Offered: Every year, All

GT 205. From College to Career (SO/CJ 205).1 Credit.

This course introduces sociology, gerontology and criminal justice majors to the preprofessional skills and knowledge they need to practice prior to obtaining their internship. Students meet regularly to discuss the breadth and potential careers in their fields and to orient the student to the professions within sociology, criminal justice and gerontology through interaction with departmental faculty and practitioners in the field. For gerontology majors only. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Offered: Every year, Spring

GT 207. Interprofessional Community-Based Service Learning Seminar: Special Populations (HSC 207).1-2 Credits.

The Interprofessional Community-Based Service Learning Seminar course includes 8-10 hours of community experience during which the student is able to observe and apply the concepts of educating an at risk population on improving health and wellness and program implementation in a community-based service setting. The community experience is supervised by faculty with expertise in the analysis of community-based practice and the focus of learning activities for students to be engaged as active learners. This community component will provide both lecture/discussion and service learning related to the impact working with population health in the local community. The classroom/service learning schedules will be determined.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101;
Offered: As needed

GT 234. Adult Developmental Psychology (PS 234).3 Credits.

This course considers facts, theory and speculation about adult development and aging. Focus is on physical, cognitive and social development as well as family and career patterns for periods of young, middle and late adulthood.

Prerequisites: Take PS 101;
Offered: Every other year

GT 263. Sociology of the Aged (SO 263).3 Credits.

This introduction to gerontology focuses on the myths and realities of aging explored through historic, demographic and sociological analyses of the conditions of elderly people in our society. Students critically examine the diversity of aging experiences in the U.S. The ways in which social and cultural factors enter into the aging process are also considered.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101;
Offered: Every year, All
UC: Social Sciences

GT 270. Program Planning and Administration (SO 270).3 Credits.

Program planning and administration of services to the elderly are considered, as well as models of needs identification, the process of problem analysis, styles of leadership and administrative dilemmas, and elements of grant proposal writing.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101;
Offered: Every other year

GT 290. Research Methods (SO 290).3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to social science research methods. Students will examine how qualitative and quantitative research methods apply to social science research. The course places particular emphasis on the importance of scientific methods in reaching informed conclusions. Students will examine a number of methods commonly used in social science disciplines and will learn how to interpret the results of research conducted using these methods. By understanding how social scientists investigate social phenomena, students are able to independently apply some research methods to their specific discipline. Students should complete the course by the end of their sophomore year.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101;
Offered: Every year, All

GT 299. Independent Study.1-4 Credits.

Independent study courses are individual examinations of topics within the discipline not covered by conventional courses. Students who wish to engage in independent study must work with a departmental faculty member. Students and faculty must agree on a topic, structure and meeting schedule.

Offered: As needed

GT 300. Special Topics in Gerontology.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

GT 302. Women, Health and Aging (SO/WS 302).3 Credits.

The purpose of this advanced seminar is to study older women's health and experiences with aging. The focus is on the complex interplay between age and gender as we examine the health and policy issues surrounding the needs of elderly women and formal and informal caregivers.

Prerequisites: Take GT 263 or SO 263;
Offered: As needed

GT 305. Death, Grief and Bereavement (SO 305).3 Credits.

Death is studied from the perspective of social interaction between the dying person, professional caregivers and family members and loved ones. Attitudes and values about death, cultural components of grief, and the function of bereavement are examined. Particular attention is paid to the social organization of "death work" and dying in bureaucratic settings, such as hospitals and nursing homes, as opposed to the non-bureaucratic structure of hospice care.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101;
Offered: Every year, All

GT 310. Elder Law (LE 310).3 Credits.

This course introduces students to topics in the law affecting older persons, such as government benefit programs (Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid), nursing homes and incapacity.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101;
Offered: As needed

GT 311. Introduction to Social Work (SO 311).3 Credits.

This course provides students with an overview of social work as a helping profession. Beginning with a preliminary understanding of the historical development of social work, students learn how changes in social work theory and practice reflect larger societal changes. Course work familiarizes students with important social work issues and concepts and discusses their application in diverse social service and human service settings. Major or minor in gerontology, sociology, criminal justice or psychology and at least junior standing.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101
Offered: Every year, Fall

GT 315. Case Management (SO 315).3 Credits.

Case management is a process used widely throughout health and social services as a means of assessing, planning, coordinating, monitoring and evaluating the services needed to respond to an individual's health and/or service needs to attain the dual goals of quality and cost effective care. Students in gerontology, sociology, psychology, and criminal justice are likely to encounter the various roles or models of case management practice as they pursue careers in human services. This course provides a foundation for case management practice in various social service settings.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101;
Offered: Every year, Spring

GT 318. Therapeutic Recreation.3 Credits.

This course of study includes the principles and practices of program planning for therapeutic recreation. The course covers analysis, assessment, design, implementation and evaluation of activities. Emphasis is on intervention, gerontological terminology, documentation, record keeping and resources.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101;
Offered: As needed

GT 325. Counseling Older Clients (SO 325).3 Credits.

Students are introduced to theories and models of effective communication with select members of an elderly population. Topics include practical aspects of communication of social service workers with older clients, older parents, older patients and the terminally ill; interview and counseling techniques; and the role of social service workers, past and present.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101;
Offered: As needed

GT 365. Aging: Problems and Policies (SO 365).3 Credits.

This course considers the social problems associated with aging, particularly in the areas of health, housing, financing and family life and the governmental policies, past, present and future, that deal with these problems.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101;
Offered: As needed

GT 382. Studying Social Issues with Statistics (SO 382).3 Credits.

In this course, students learn basic introductory-level statistics and quantitative reasoning skills necessary for careers in gerontology. Through hands-on application, students learn research design, basic statistical data collection and data analysis. For gerontology majors only, junior or above.

Prerequisites: Take GT 381;
Offered: Every year, Spring

GT 385. Senior Capstone (SO 385).3 Credits.

This senior seminar is designed as the capstone course for students majoring in sociology and gerontology. Students research a sociological or aging-related topic of their choosing and write a thesis based on their work. All senior theses represent a culmination of majors' academic experiences in the department. For gerontology majors only in the senior year.

Prerequisites: Take GT 381;
Offered: Every year, All

GT 392. Internship in the Community.3 Credits.

For gerontology majors in their junior or senior year only. Each student devotes 120 hours a week on-site in a public or private community agency that provides services to the elderly and also spends one hour a week in class. The position is tailored to the student's preparation and interests and to the needs of the agency. The student learns how an organization works, its relation to other organizations in the community, how it serves its clients, and the problems that confront it. Enrollment, limited to gerontology majors, is a commitment by the student to adhere to a high standard of attendance, confidentiality, professionalism and responsibility.

Prerequisites: Take GT 263;
Offered: Every year, All

GT 394. Advanced Internship in the Community.3 Credits.

A required second internship for gerontology majors in their junior or senior year only. Students complete 120 hours of supervised fieldwork in a community agency that provides services to the elderly. They also spend one hour per week in the advanced internship seminar class. Throughout the course, students build upon the knowledge gained from their first internship experience to deepen their understanding of social structures, broaden their experience with diversity, and refine their personal sense of responsible citizenship. Students also assess their interpersonal strengths and weaknesses through written and oral reflection in preparation for graduate school and/or future employment. In addition to the seminar requirements, students are required to adhere to strict standards of attendance, confidentality, professionalism and responsibility at their internship site.

Prerequisites: Take GT 392;
Offered: Every year, All

GT 399. Independent Study.3 Credits.

By arrangement with individual instructor. Independent study courses are individual examinations of topics within the discipline not covered by conventional courses. Students who wish to engage in independent study must work with a departmental faculty member. Students and faculty must agree on a topic, structure and meeting schedule.

Offered: As needed