Biomedical Sciences (BMS)

BMS 110. The World of Microbes.3 Credits.

In this course, which is designed for nonscience majors, students are introduced to the relevance of microorganisms in everyday life. Topics include: microbes in the environment, infectious disease, biotechnology, food microbiology, antibiotics and host defense mechanisms (e.g., the immune system). This course must be taken in association with BMS 110L.

Corequisites: Take BMS 110L.
Offered: As needed
UC: Natural Sciences

BMS 110L. The World of Microbes Lab.1 Credit.

Students in this laboratory course explore by experimentation the nature of microorganisms, in particular, bacteria. This includes growing bacteria in culture, staining them and viewing them under the microscope and testing their ability to survive under various conditions. This course must be taken in conjunction with BMS 110.

Corequisites: Take BMS 110.
Offered: As needed

BMS 114. Microbes in Action.3 Credits.

This course is designed to emphasize the applied aspects and disease potential of microorganisms. Of particular interest is the role microorganisms play in the environment.

Corequisites: Take BMS 114L.
Offered: As needed

BMS 114L. Microbes in Action Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany BMS 114. (2 lab hrs.)

Corequisites: Take BMS 114.
Offered: As needed

BMS 117. The Human Organism.3 Credits.

This course emphasizes the human organism from a basic biological and developmental perspective. These concepts are explored by examining the development of the total human organism beginning with conception and onward into old age and eventual death. This course must be taken in conjunction with BMS 117L, the laboratory component of this course.

Corequisites: Take BMS 117L.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Natural Sciences

BMS 117L. The Human Organism Lab.1 Credit.

This lab, which accompanies BMS 117, The Human Organism, includes exercises/experiments designed to reinforce basic biological principles, which form the basis for understanding the biology of all organisms, including the human organism. This course must be taken in conjunction with BMS 117 lecture.

Corequisites: Take BMS 117.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BMS 162. Human Health.3 Credits.

This course, which is designed for nonscience majors, describes human disease from a biological viewpoint, and presents human health concerns and issues for discussion. Historical and sociological perspectives on human disease as well as the scientific investigation of disease processes are included. The role of molecular biology and biotechnology in approaching human disease is discussed.

Offered: Every year, Fall
UC: Natural Sciences

BMS 200. Biology and Experience of Human Aging.3 Credits.

Key concepts of this course include: 1) the natural decline in human capabilities and function; 2) significant elder diseases; 3) elder health care issues; 4) factors that affect aging rates; and 5) death and dying. The course begins with concepts including research techniques, cellular aging and demographics. The second half focuses on the organ systems significantly affected in aging including skin, bones, muscle, the senses, the cardiovascular system and the nervous system.

Prerequisites: Take 1 group; BIO 101-102 or BIO 150-151 or BMS 117 BMS 162.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Natural Sciences, Intercultural Understand

BMS 213. Microbiology and Pathology.3 Credits.

This introductory overview of microorganisms presents a detailed study of the interactions of pathogenic microbes and humans, particularly as they apply to a clinical setting; this course is designed primarily for the health practitioner. This course must be taken in conjunction with BMS 213L. Students may receive credit for BMS 213 or BMS 370, but not both.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 101 BIO 102 or BIO 150 BIO 151.
Corequisites: Take BMS 213L.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BMS 213L. Microbiology and Pathology Lab.1 Credit.

This lab, which accompanies BMS 213 Microbiology and Pathology, includes exercises/experiments designed to cultivate basic microbiological techniques and reinforce important principles of general and clinical microbiology. This course must be taken in conjunction with BMS 213.

Corequisites: Take BMS 213.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BMS 276. Drug Development.3 Credits.

In this course, students study the processes required to develop new drugs, as well as the regulations associated with drug development. Topics include drug discovery, preclinical and clinical testing of drugs, pharmaco-economics and legislation associated with drug development. Specific therapeutic drug examples are discussed throughout the course.

Prerequisites: Take 1 group; BIO 101-102 or BIO 150-151 or BMS 117 BMS 162 or BIO 105-106.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BMS 278. Research and Technology.3 Credits.

This course provides a broad, discussion-based investigation of current scientific techniques including scientific writing, presentations, literature searches, as well as bioinformatics, protein and nucleic acid methodologies. Students learn the skills necessary to identify and understand the proper techniques for designing, implementing and evaluating scientific research. This interactive course helps prepare students for independent research projects at Quinnipiac University, graduate/professional programs and careers in the biological, biomedical or health sciences.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 150-150L
Offered: Every year, Spring

BMS 300. The Physiology of Human Performance I.3 Credits.

This course presents a detailed examination of muscle and nerve physiology, and central nervous system control of posture and locomotion. Bioenergetics and exercise metabolism are considered. Anatomical and physiological factors limiting various types of physical performance are discussed. Full-year course; must be taken in sequence. This course must be taken in conjunction with BMS 300L.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 212 and CHE 102-102L or CHE 111-111L.
Offered: Every year, Fall

BMS 300L. The Physiology of Human Performance I Lab.1 Credit.

(3 lab hrs.) Laboratory exercises/experiments are designed to reinforce basic principles of physiology examined in lecture. This course must be taken in conjunction with BMS 300 lecture.

Corequisites: Take BMS 300.
Offered: Every year, Fall

BMS 301. Physiology of Human Performance II.3 Credits.

This course presents a detailed examination of cardiorespiratory and thermoregulatory responses to exercise. Body composition and diet/nutrition are considered. Anatomical and physiological factors limiting various types of physical performance are discussed. Full-year course; must be taken in sequence. This course must be taken in association with BMS 301L.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 300-300L.
Corequisites: Take BMS 301L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

BMS 301L. Physiology of Human Performance II Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany BMS 301 (3 lab hrs.) Laboratory exercises/experiments are designed to reinforce basic principles of physiology examined in lecture. This course must be taken in association with BMS 301.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 300.
Corequisites: Take BMS 301.
Offered: Every year, Spring

BMS 304. Biological Chemistry.3 Credits.

This course, which is for ELMPA majors only, is a comprehensive study of contemporary biochemistry for pre-physician assistant students. The fundamental chemical and physical principles that underlie living processes are examined with an emphasis on the chemical structure and biological function. Medical and clinical perspectives relate the chemistry to health concerns and/or diagnostic applications. Students who have completed CHE 315 are not eligible to take this course.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 102-102L or BIO 151-151L and BIO 212-212L CHE 111 CHE 211.
Offered: As needed

BMS 310. Neuroanatomy.3 Credits.

This course offers the pre-physician assistant student a detailed study of the gross anatomy and development of the central nervous system. Major structures and landmarks within each major brain vesicle and spinal cord are covered.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 102-102L or BIO 151-151L.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

BMS 318. Pathophysiology.3 Credits.

This course takes a mechanistic approach to the regulation of function of organ systems to provide students with the underlying physiological concepts in the homeostasis of each system and its interrelationship to other systems, the pertinent diseases that best exemplify the disarray of the controlling mechanism. Students learn a way of thinking that enables them to conceptualize clinical problems in relation to system functions.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 211-212 or BIO 227-228.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BMS 319. Public Health: Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases.3 Credits.

This course will provide an introduction to the application of epidemiological principles and practice to the study of infectious diseases. This course will focus on the study of the frequency, distribution, and determinants of infectious diseases of major public health importance. Emphasis also will be placed on prevention methods and public health control efforts undertaken locally, nationally, and internationally.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 213 or BMS 370.
Offered: Every year, Fall

BMS 320. Pharmacology.3 Credits.

This course takes a physiological systems approach to the study of the major classes of drugs used in therapeutics. Each class of drugs is studied according to dose-response characteristics, mechanism of action, major physiological effects, toxicity and possible drug interaction.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 211-212 or BIO 227-228.
Offered: Every year, Spring

BMS 325. Toxicology.3 Credits.

Toxicology is the branch of science that investigates the complex interactions between exogenous chemicals and physical processes (e.g. radiation) with living organisms. This course entails an examination of the absorption, distribution, toxicokinetics, metabolism and elimination of exogenous substances from the body. Particular emphasis is placed on the effects of toxic agents on the following systems in humans: hepatobiliary, pulmonary, renal, nervous and reproductive. The role of toxic chemicals/physical agents in teratogenesis, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis also is studied.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 102-102L CHE 211.
Offered: Every year, Spring

BMS 330. Endocrinology.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to 1) an intensive understanding of the mechanism of hormone action; 2) the importance of the interrelationship among all hormones; 3) a detailed clinical situation dealing with hormonal aberrations; and 4) a theoretical and practical method for hormone assays.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 102-102L or BIO 151-151L.
Offered: Every year, Fall

BMS 332. Histology.4 Credits.

This course is intended for senior ELMPA students. It entails the microscopic and ultra-microscopic study of the structure of cells, tissues and organs, and emphasizes their functional mechanisms. Students learn how to prepare and stain normal tissue slides for histological and histochemical study, and how to examine these prepared slides.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 211-212 CHE 210-211.
Offered: Every year, Spring

BMS 370. General Microbiology.3 Credits.

This study of the biology of bacteria and other microorganisms includes the structural features, genetics, biochemistry, ecology and symbiotic relationships of microbes, with particular emphasis on the differences between unicellular microbes and multicellular organisms. Students may receive credit for BMS 370 or BMS 213, but not both. This course must be taken in conjunction with BMS 370L.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 101-102 or BIO 150-151; and CHE 110-111.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BMS 370L. General Microbiology Lab.1 Credit.

In the laboratory component of General Microbiology, students master foundational microbiological techniques such as microscopy, staining and culture of microbes, and utilize these techniques to explore various properties of microbes relevant to clinical, industrial, environmental and household settings. Students also identify unknown bacteria using both biochemical assays and molecular techniques. Critical thinking is emphasized through a project-based inquiry approach. This course must be taken in conjunction with BMS 370.

Corequisites: Take BMS 370.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BMS 372. Pathogenic Microbiology.3 Credits.

This course involves the study of medically important microbes. Topics include the principles of microbial pathogenesis, host-microbe interactions and etiology of infectious disease. This course must be taken in conjunction with BMS 372L.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 370-370L.
Corequisites: Take BMS 372L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

BMS 372L. Pathogenic Microbiology Lab.1 Credit.

The laboratory component of Pathogenic Microbiology includes laboratory exercises/experiments designed to reinforce the biochemical, serological and pathogenic characteristics of disease-producing microorganisms. Special emphasis is placed on techniques used to identify disease-causing microorganisms and differentiating them from closely related members of human indigenous microflora. This course must be taken in conjunction with BMS 372.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 370-370L.
Corequisites: Take BMS 372.
Offered: Every year, Spring

BMS 373. Mycology.3 Credits.

The morphology, taxonomy and phylogeny of fungi are studied in this course. The laboratory companion to this course (BMS 373L) provides opportunities for culturing and performing biochemical analyses of selected fungi, including human pathogens. This course must be taken in conjunction with BMS 373L.

Corequisites: Take BMS 373L.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

BMS 373L. Mycology Lab.1 Credit.

This lab accompanies BMS 373 Mycology and allows many opportunities for culturing and performing biochemical analyses of selected fungi, including human pathogens. This course must be taken in conjunction with BMS 373.

Corequisites: Take BMS 373.
Offered: As needed

BMS 375. Immunology.3 Credits.

This course entails a study of the basic principles and regulatory mechanisms of the human immune response. Innate defenses along with cellular and humoral immune defense mechanisms are studied in detail. Abnormal immune system functions are explored via study of acquired and primary immunodeficiencies and autoimmune diseases. Vaccines and transplantation also are discussed. Students may receive credit for BMS 375 or HSC 375, but not both. Students withdrawing from either lecture or lab must withdraw from both. Prerequisite: BMS 370 (or BMS 213 with permission of the instructor); BMS majors must take BMS 375 and BMS 375L together.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 370-370L.
Corequisites: Take BMS 375L.
Offered: Every year, Fall

BMS 375L. Immunology Lab.1 Credit.

The laboratory component of Immunology involves laboratory exercises/experiments designed to reinforce immunological concepts. Topics fundamental to both immunological research and clinical diagnostics are covered. Cellular-based and clinically relevant concepts are reinforced via hands-on immunological techniques, class discussions, presentations and case studies. Students withdrawing from either lecture or lab must withdraw from both. BMS majors must take BMS 375 and BMS 375L together.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 370-370L.
Corequisites: Take BMS 375.
Offered: Every year, Fall

BMS 378. Vaccines and Vaccine-Preventable Diseases.3 Credits.

This course examines the current understanding of vaccinations, as well as the historical and current implication of vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs). Students gain knowledge regarding VPDs and the childhood vaccination schedule. They gain an understanding of how vaccines work, why they are still necessary, and how to explain why they are safe. Emphasis is placed on the need to effectively communicate with the public regarding vaccine myths and misconceptions. Also included is a publicly disseminated "change the world" project. Students may only take one of the following for credit: BMS 378, HSC 378 or BMS 525.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 213-213L or BMS 370-370L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

BMS 399. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

BMS 470. Virology.4 Credits.

This course covers the strategies employed by different virus families to infect host cells and replicate within them. This includes animal, plant and bacterial viruses. Topics include: viral structure, genetics, molecular mechanism of replication and host response to infection. Students also are exposed to standard research methodologies and cutting-edge research used in the field through reviews of current research articles.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 370-370L.
Offered: Every year, Fall

BMS 470L. Virology Lab.0 Credits.

Lab to accompany BMS 470. (4 lab hrs.)

Offered: Every year, Fall

BMS 472. Biotechnology.4 Credits.

This course addresses the isolation, growth, genetic manipulation and use of organisms (commonly genetically modified) or their products in fermented food production, agriculture, pharmaceutical discovery and production, molecular diagnostics, vaccine production, transgenic animal formation and human gene therapy. Purification, identification, optimization, testing, government regulations and patents are addressed. This hands-on course is designed for students interested in careers in the expanding modern world of applied biology and microbiology in research and industry (4 lab hrs.).

Prerequisites: Take BMS 370-370L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

BMS 473. Infections of Leisure.3 Credits.

This course looks at infectious hazards associated with a wide range of human leisure activities, from lazing on a beach to relaxing in a spa, dining out, or simply staying home and gardening. Participants discuss infections linked to salt and freshwater activities, camping and the outdoors, gardening, contact with animals, eating, foreign travel, sports, sexually transmitted diseases, body piercing, tattooing and trekking to high altitudes. Topics such as epidemiology, antibiotic resistance, pathogenicity, plagues and vaccines also are addressed. This course has social organization of the science of infectious diseases.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 370-370L or BMS 213-213L.
Offered: Every year, Fall

BMS 474. Power of Plagues.3 Credits.

This course examines the impact of infectious diseases on humans--in the past, in the present and in the future. From the 14th-century plague to the current HIV/AIDS, diseases have fundamentally altered the shape of society, politics and culture. This class examines some important diseases, including their impact, pathogenicity, infectivity, epidemiology, consequences, costs and lessons learned. Diseases such as smallpox, polio, rabies, tuberculosis, cholera, bubonic plague, influenza, malaria, yellow fever, syphilis and AIDS are investigated. The impact of antibiotics, antibiotic resistance and nosocomial infections also is discussed.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 213-213L or BMS 370-370L.
Offered: Every year, Summer

BMS 475. Special Topics in Microbiology.1-4 Credits.

The latest developments and concepts in the field of clinical and public health microbiology are introduced. Topics may include the oral microbiology, epidemiology of Streptococcal and Staphylococcal infections, antibiotic resistance, drug susceptibility testing, the bacteriology of the hospital environment, vaccine-preventable diseases or quality control in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Recommendation of BMS 213/370 lab instructor and permission of instructor needed. One lecture hour, one research meeting hour, one discussion hour and 4-10 lab hours.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 370-370L or BMS 213-213L.
Offered: Every year, All

BMS 476. Environmental Microbiology.3 Credits.

In this course, students examine the role of the many interesting and unique microorganisms found in the natural environment, especially those from extreme environments (the "extremophiles") such as deep sea vents, hot springs, high salinity areas, extremes of pH, etc. Also included in this course are environmental microbes that may be of interest in the industrial setting. This hands-on course examines air, soil and water microorganisms along with their ecological relationships and significance to the environment.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 370-370L or BMS 213-213L.
Offered: As needed

BMS 478. Microbiology Seminar.1 Credit.

This course introduces students to the microbiology- and immunology-related literature required for the development, implementation and analysis of an independent research project in microbiology and immunology. For microbiology majors.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 370-370L.
Offered: Every year, Fall

BMS 479. Microbiology Research.2 Credits.

Independent projects in selected areas of microbiology and biotechnology are completed under the direction of a faculty member. For microbiology majors.

Prerequisites: Take BMS 370-370L.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BMS 481. Research Methods in Biomedical Sciences I.1-4 Credits.

Students learn the basic principles of research methodology. Register by paper with your mentor.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BMS 482. Independent Study in Microbiology.1-4 Credits.

This course consists of microbiology content not offered by another QU catalog course. It must involve contact hours and scholarly activities equivalent to any regularly offered course. This course often includes review of the scientific literature in the field of the research project and creating a "product," such as a term essay, a series of short papers, laboratory or project reports, a portfolio or presentation at a scientific meeting. Students cannot register online; registration is via a paper form only. BMS students may take up to 8 credits of BMS 482, BMS 483, BMS 498, BMS 499, HSC 498, HSC 499.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BMS 483. Independent Study in Microbiology.1-4 Credits.

This course consists of microbiology content not offered by another QU catalog course. It must involve contact hours and scholarly activities equivalent to any regularly offered course. This course often includes review of the scientific literature in the field of the research project and creating a "product," such as a term essay, a series of short papers, laboratory or project reports, a portfolio or presentation at a scientific meeting. Students cannot register online; registration is via a paper form only. BMS students may take up to 8 credits of BMS 482, BMS 483, BMS 498, BMS 499, HSC 498, HSC 499.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BMS 498. Independent Study in Biomedical Sciences I.1-4 Credits.

This course consists of biomedical sciences content not offered by another QU catalog course. It must involve contact hours and scholarly activities equivalent to any regularly offered course. This course often includes review of the scientific literature in the field of the research project and creating a "product," such as a term essay, a series of short papers, laboratory or project reports, a portfolio or presentation at a scientific meeting. Students cannot register online; registration is via a paper form only. BMS students may take up to 8 credits of BMS 482, BMS 483, BMS 498, BMS 499, HSC 498, HSC 499.

Offered: As needed

BMS 499. Independent Study in Biomedical Sciences II.1-4 Credits.

This course consists of biomedical sciences content not offered by another QU catalog course. It must involve contact hours and scholarly activities equivalent to any regularly offered course. This course often includes review of the scientific literature in the field of the research project and creating a "product," such as a term essay, a series of short papers, laboratory or project reports, a portfolio or presentation at a scientific meeting. Students cannot register online; registration is via a paper form only. BMS students may take up to 8 credits of BMS 482, BMS 483, BMS 498, HSC 498, HSC 499.

Offered: As needed