Department of Visual and Performing Arts

The Department of Visual and Performing Arts is an interdisciplinary department that offers students the opportunity to study the history, theory and practice of art, design, theater, game design and music. The visual arts programs foster the development of creative processes for the creation of innovative works of art and design while situating the work in the broader contexts of history and culture. The performing arts programs include courses in the history of the disciplines and techniques of performance, which are enriched by an active theater production program and performing ensembles.

Programs in the Department of Visual and Performing Arts offer students a foundation in creative thinking that is recognized as critical to problem-solving and conceptualization, qualities increasingly valued by leaders and organizations in all areas of society.

The Department of Visual and Performing Arts at Quinnipiac University is committed to providing our students with the opportunity to develop creative thinking skills through experiential learning as a part of their general education and in pre-professional programs. By studying the practice, theory and history of: music, theater, visual art, and game design, we provide an opportunity for students to explore their creative abilities in a hands-on environment.

Art (AR)

AR 101. Introduction to Art.3 Credits.

This course is a study of major art forms and a probe into the nature of the creative process and public response. The course combines art history with hands-on activities. It is intended for students who plan to take only one art course.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 102. Art History: Ancient Through Medieval.3 Credits.

This introductory course considers art as seen in its cultural and historical context from prehistory through the medieval period. Students explore the stylistic elements that make great works typical of their era.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 102H. Honors Art History I.3 Credits.

This introductory course considers art as seen in its cultural and historical context from prehistory through the medieval period. Students explore the stylistic elements that make great works typical of their era.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 103. Art History: Renaissance Through Contemporary.3 Credits.

This introductory course considers art as seen in its cultural and historical context from the Renaissance through the contemporary era. Students explore the stylistic elements that make great works typical of their era.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 103H. Art History: Renaissance Through Contemporary.3 Credits.

Honors Course -- This introductory course considers art as seen in its cultural and historical context from the Renaissance through the contemporary era. Students explore the stylistic elements that make great works typical of their era.

UC: Fine Arts

AR 104. Survey of Non-Western Art.3 Credits.

Participants study the major themes and forms of non-Western arts from East Asia, South Asia, Africa, the Pre-Columbian Americas and Oceania, with emphasis on their cultural, philosophical and religious contexts. Students define works of art both formally and within the framework of their method of manufacture, audience and cultural value. They also explore aspects of various non-Western religions, cultural considerations and influences in relation to the works. Students with little experience of or no prior courses in art history learn the basic terminology and methodology of the field.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 105. American Art.3 Credits.

This course serves as an introduction to the history of art in the United States from the pre-colonial period to the present. The curriculum includes a careful analysis of representative works reinforced by visits to area art galleries.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 140. Basic Visual Design.3 Credits.

This course exposes students to the basics of two-dimensional design. Topics include the elements of design, the principles of order and how these basics combine to create exceptional composition in various forms of art.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 158. Photography I.3 Credits.

This beginning course in still photography is designed to teach basic photographic techniques. Additional topics include lighting, advertising, fashion and portrait photography. Students must provide a fully adjustable digital camera, or Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 175. Special Topics in Art History.3 Credits.

This group of courses introduces art history by way of particular themes. Each covers at least three eras or movements in art history, exploring imagery, sculpture, architecture and decorative arts. Topics include: The Art and Architecture of Health and Medicine; Art and Propaganda; The Art and Imagery of Weaponry and War; Art and Love; Art and Death; and The Image of the Divine.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 200. Special Topics Course.3 Credits.

AR 210. The Creative Process.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the creative process in the visual arts. Students learn to evaluate and critique their personal artwork as well as the work of others to develop a working process that enables them to go from initial thought to final product. Topics include: how to expand on initial ideas, the proper use of a sketchbook, looking at and evaluating famous works of art, and how to know when a work of art is finished.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 240. Graphic Design.3 Credits.

Students gain practical experience in the creation of pictorial devices used to disseminate product information, including drawing, painting, illustration and typography.

Prerequisites: Take AR 140;
Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 241. Color Theory.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the basics of color theory in design. Participants explore different topics through a series of short in-class projects and longer out of class assignments. Topics include the use of the grey scale, color mixing, color harmonies and discord, among others.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 242. Cartooning.3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the history of the comic and cartoon arts, and explores a variety of cartooning techniques. While studying the techniques of the masters, students plan, and eventually execute their own original cartoons. This class is open to absolute beginners as well as students with previous drawing, painting and cartooning experience.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 250. Studio Art: Special Topic.3 Credits.

Students gain hands-on experience in creative art. The medium varies from year to year and from section to section.

Offered: As needed, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 251. Studio Art: Drawing (AR303).3 Credits.

This studio course serves as an introduction to basic drawing skills. Subjects may include still life, landscape and portraits. Work is done in pencil, ink and other media.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 252. Studio Art: Painting (AR304).3 Credits.

This studio course serves as an introduction to basic painting skills. Course work includes specialized painting techniques, color theory and assignments based on both traditional and contemporary styles. All work is completed in acrylic painting media with some mixed media components.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 253. Studio Art: Sculpture.3 Credits.

This studio course introduces students to sculpture and three-dimensional design using a variety of materials. Students gain an understanding and appreciation of basic techniques and processes involved in creating sculpture and learn how a three-dimensional object impacts its environment.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 254. Studio Art: Printmaking.3 Credits.

This studio course serves as an introduction to the many processes used in printmaking. Techniques studied include those used in woodcut and linoleum cut, etching and drypoint, monotype and monoprint, embossment and lithography.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 255. Studio Art: Introduction to Darkroom Photography.3 Credits.

This class covers basic black and white photographic techniques used in both processing and printing.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 257. AP Studio Art Introduction to Studio Methods.3 Credits.

This eight-week accelerated course introduces students to basic studio methods. Both traditional and contemporary techniques are explored through a series of short in-class projects and longer out-of-class assignments. Course work includes techniques and materials for a variety of media, including drawing, painting, watercolor, sculpture and printmaking.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 258. Photography II.3 Credits.

This course is a continuation of Photography I (AR 158). From daguerreotypes to digital, photography's history and future are discussed through slide lectures and hands-on activities. Each student must provide an adjustable digital or film 35 mm. camera, and photo processing.

Prerequisites: Take AR 158;
Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 260. Design Innovations.3 Credits.

This advanced design course introduces students to the way products are packaged and advertised to the public. The curriculum consists of presentations, design assignments and student participation. Students study the history of packaging and advertising from its inception up to the present day. Design mediums include print, packaging material and video. Students are expected to pursue their own design projects. Prior experience with advertising and packaging design is not necessary, only a curious mind, enthusiasm and the ability to investigate ideas.

Prerequisites: Take AR 140;
Offered: As needed

AR 262. Studio Art: Watercolor.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the basics of watercolor. Participants explore different topics through a series of short in-class projects and longer out-of-class assignments. Topics include specialized watercolor painting techniques, color theory and assignments based on both traditional and contemporary styles. All work is completed in watercolor with some mixed media components.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 263. Studio Art: Collage.3 Credits.

This hands-on studio course enables students to explore materials and techniques involved in the art of making collage. This course looks at various ways to incorporate pre-made materials into more elaborate finished projects. Participants use a variety of materials including both manmade and natural objects as well as various painting, drawing and sculpture media.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 280. History of Modern Design.3 Credits.

Students examine design trends from fashion to product to interior design from the Industrial Revolution to the present day. Distinct from fine arts, design reflects the industrialization of the modern world. Students learn to recognize design styles and classic examples of design as well as the circumstances and creative spirit that have driven design throughout history.

Offered: As needed, Summer
UC: Fine Arts

AR 299. Independent Study.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed, All

AR 300. Special Topics in Art History.3 Credits.

Upper level special topics courses in studio art or art history. Prerequisites vary by section.

Prerequisites: Take AR 102 or AR 103 or AR 104 or AR 105;
Offered: As needed, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 303. Studio Art: Advanced (AR251) Drawing.3 Credits.

This advanced drawing class expands on knowledge gained in an introductory level drawing course. Topics include both traditional and contemporary techniques and advanced composition. Work is completed in various drawing materials, including charcoal, pencil, conte and ink.

Prerequisites: Take AR 251;
Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 304. Studio Art: Advanced (AR304) Painting.3 Credits.

This advanced painting class enhances knowledge gained in an introductory level painting course. Specialized painting techniques include expanded color theory as well as an introduction to contemporary techniques. All work is completed in acrylic paint with some mixed media components.

Prerequisites: Take AR 252;
Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

AR 305. Special Topics in Studio Art.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 316. World Architecture.3 Credits.

Major styles and architects are studied with special emphasis on American architecture.

Prerequisites: Take one of the following; AR 102 AR 103 AR 104 or AR 105;
Offered: As needed

AR 317. Art of the Italian Renaissance.3 Credits.

This course covers the period from c.1350-1600 in Italy. Participants study the painters, sculptors and architects of the period, including their artistic techniques, styles and use of symbolism. Topics include the writings by artists of the time as well as an examination of those artists and artistic movements that served as precursors to this compelling period of art history. Students further study the political, religious, economic and scientific advances of the period, including opportunities for women and the influence of regional geography on the arts.

Prerequisites: Take AR 102 AR 103 AR 104 or AR 105;
Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 325. Women Artists (WS 315).3 Credits.

This art history course focuses on the lives and artwork of women such as Hildegard von Bingen, Mary Cassatt, Frida Kahlo and Georgia O'Keefe.

Prerequisites: Take one of the following: AR 102 AR 103 AR 104 or AR 105;
Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 335. Digital Photography.3 Credits.

This course is designed to help students learn digital camera operation, as well as computer-based image correction and manipulation through the use of Adobe Photoshop. Participants explore relevant topics through class lectures, demonstrations, in-class exercises and out-of-class assignments. Topics include the methods and techniques used to create, edit and critically judge digital images.

Prerequisites: Take one of the following: AR 140 AR 158 or AR 255;
Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 342. Illustration.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the art of illustration. Through hands-on assignments and demonstrations, students learn the methodology of an illustrator, including generating ideas, visualization, research, preliminary studies or roughs, comprehensives and the finished picture. A variety of relevant media, materials and techniques are explored. Course work is supplemented by lectures on historic and contemporary techniques, projects and illustrators.

Prerequisites: Take AR 140 or AR 251;
Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 356. Studio Art: Figure Drawing.3 Credits.

This course serves as an introduction to the basics of figure drawing. Both traditional and contemporary styles of figurative imagery are explored through a series of short in-class projects and longer out-of-class assignments. Course work involves the use of various drawing materials and techniques.

Prerequisites: Take AR 251;
Offered: As needed

AR 360. Innovation in the Arts and Sciences(PL 360).3 Credits.

This course reviews science and art practices to explore how innovations occur. Because discovery and invention go hand in hand, students consider the ethics of constructing according to needs, imagination and a sense of what the world should be. Particular attention is paid to the values of diversity, from disciplines to cultures. Junior or senior status is required.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 380. Interactive Art (PL 380).3 Credits.

This course presents an interdisciplinary examination of the functions in art, literature and theater through readings and discussions of selected creative and critical works. Topics include self-organization, open systems, emergence, complexity, pragmatism and play. Students use the final project to demonstrate a practical understanding of interactive processes. Junior or senior status is required.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

AR 399. Independent Study.3 Credits.

Advanced independent studio work in painting, printmaking, graphic design, photography.

Offered: As needed, All

AR 499. Independent Study.3 Credits.

Advanced independent studio work in painting, printmaking, graphic design, photography.

Offered: As needed, All

Game Design and Development (GDD)

GDD 101. Introduction to Game Design.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the practice of game design (board, card, dice, physical games), theories of game design and play, the study of the social effects of games, the role of serious games for teaching and learning and production practices in the games industry.

Offered: Every year, All

GDD 102. Drawing for Animé, Games and Animation.3 Credits.

In this course, students learn through observational drawing basics of proportion, anatomy, weight and balance to develop characters for video games and 2D and 3D animation. Topics include approaches to stylization such as animé and graphic novels. Students use both traditional pencil and paper as well as Adobe Photoshop and other software.

Offered: Every year, Spring

GDD 110. Introduction to Visual Design for Games.3 Credits.

This foundation course prepares students for upper-level course work by introducing critical, analytical and problem-solving strategies for researching and developing graphics for games. Practical hands-on methods include visual research, design journals, thumbnail sketches, concept art, pixel art, storyboarding, 2D and 3D development tools.

Offered: Every year, Fall

GDD 140. Creativity and Computation.3 Credits.

This course teaches software literacy within the visual arts and visual literacy within technology. Students develop basic coding expertise and the confidence necessary to create interactive artwork. The course teaches essential 21st-century skills including computational and systems thinking, along with quantitative reasoning coupled to creative problem solving and generative visual aesthetics. No previous experience with programming necessary.

Offered: Every year, Fall

GDD 175. Special Topics in Game Design.3 Credits.

Courses of particular interest to game design students offered on an occasional basis. These courses have no prerequisite. See the Special Topics Bulletin on the Registrar's website for specific course descriptions.

Offered: As needed

GDD 200. Introduction to Game Development.3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of game development through project work. Students examine different game genres, game mechanics and playability, sound, level and interface design. Through project work, students gain an understanding of the game development life cycle and the roles of design teams.

Offered: Every year, Spring

GDD 201. Game Design I.3 Credits.

In this course, students delve deeper into game design principles and how they apply to games. Students critically assess game concepts, objectives, narrative structure and storyline, character, game mechanics, playability and the potential of meaningful or serious "play" for teaching and learning. Students apply the results to a variety of game design projects HTML, CSS and Javascript.

Offered: Every year, Fall

GDD 202. Game Art I.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the software tools required to design and build 3D assets for games and animation, while gaining knowledge of the artistic development process.

Prerequisites: Take GDD 102 or GDD 110 or permission of the program director;
Offered: Every year, Fall

GDD 210. Game Lab I: Team Projects.3 Credits.

This is the first of a two-course sequence focusing on game production, coding, prototyping and playtesting. In Game Lab I, students work individually and in teams to define and develop game concepts, research content, develop game mechanics, create game assets and build working prototypes.

Prerequisites: Take GDD 200;
Offered: Every year, Fall

GDD 211. Game Lab II: Team Projects.3 Credits.

This course is a continuation of GDD 210. Students continue to work individually and in teams to build working prototypes while learning about the game development process, project management, play testing and usability testing. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of the program director.

Prerequisites: Take GDD 210;
Offered: Every year, Spring

GDD 250. Interactive Storytelling & Narrative.3 Credits.

Students critically analyze narrative structure and character development based on readings and game play. Students use creative writing, create interactive multimedia projects and create games that explore new emerging forms such as digital storytelling, interactive theater, and virtual worlds.

Offered: Every other year, Fall

GDD 260. History of Video Games.3 Credits.

Video games are an interactive medium grounded in step-by-step innovation in console and computer systems combined with parallel development in software capabilities. This course examines the cultural, social and educational aspects of games and considers how they changed over time in response to market pressures, societal concerns about content and technological development. Students play and analyze historical games, learn how to write game reviews and research new phenomenon in game development.

Offered: Every other year, Spring

GDD 290. Internship.1-3 Credits.

Under the supervision of a faculty member and a participating private company, corporation, institution or community organization, students gain real-world experience working in the field of game design. For majors or minors in game design and development. Requires permission of the program director.

Offered: Every year, All

GDD 299. Independent Study.3 Credits.

Under the supervision of a faculty member, students pursue self-directed research and in-depth study in a subject that is not covered by the existing curriculum.

Offered: As needed

GDD 300. Special Topics in Game Design.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

GDD 301. Game Design II.3 Credits.

This course is a continuation of GDD 201. Students continue the critical assessment of game concepts, objectives, narrative structures and storylines, character development, game mechanics, playability and the potential of meaningful or serious "play" for teaching and learning. Students apply this knowledge by designing games for different platforms including browsers, phones, Virtual Reality and evolving technologies.

Prerequisites: Take GDD 101 or GDD 201;
Offered: Every year, Spring

GDD 302. Game Art II.3 Credits.

Students continue working with software tools required for designing and building 3D assets such as characters, costumes, props, levels, environments and worlds.

Prerequisites: Take GDD 202;
Offered: Every year, Spring

GDD 303. The Art of Audio Narrative (FVI 380 EN 303).3 Credits.

This course is about storytelling. Students learn the basics of multi-track audio recording and mixing. They write and produce fiction and nonfiction audio narratives. Each project is shared in a stimulating and mutually supportive workshop environment. Students read and listen widely to gain a sense of the history and theory of radio art. Participants also spend time identifying target audiences and looking at ways to distribute student work to the larger world of public and independent radio. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of program director.

Prerequisites: Take GDD 101;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

GDD 310. Game Lab III: Team.3 Credits.

Game Labs III and IV form a two-course sequence that builds upon the experience of game design and prototyping gained in Game Labs I and II. Students work in teams to develop and playtest working prototypes. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of the program director.

Prerequisites: Take GDD 211;
Offered: Every year, Fall

GDD 311. Game Lab IV: Team Projects.3 Credits.

This course is a continuation of Game Lab III. Students work in teams to build working prototypes and manage the life cycle of the game development process including troubleshooting, playtesting, usability testing and revisions. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of the program director.

Prerequisites: Take GDD 211;
Offered: Every year, Spring

GDD 350. Board Game Design.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the design of table-top and board games. Board games share many ideas with digital games but utilize different game mechanics. Designing for board games explores the practice of alternate approaches to game design, and the skills learned in this class can be applied to both. Topics include design, history, manufacturing and different genres such as classic board games, deck-building games and card-based strategy games.

Offered: Every other year, Fall

GDD 370. Acting and Directing for Game Design.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the craft of directing and acting for game production. Topics include story analysis and interpretation, director's concept, and the history and theories of directing. Students learn the basic principles of acting, including scene analysis, motivation, intention and character work. They perform exercises, monologues and scenes. Additional topics include methods of actor coaching, rehearsal techniques and working with the creative game design team.

Offered: Every other year, Spring

GDD 380. The Business of Games.3 Credits.

This course helps students gain an understanding of how to develop and run a successful video game business. Students look at existing businesses and new businesses as models and cautionary tales. Topics include developing financials, how to market a business, building a strong company culture, how to crowdfund and how to incorporate.

Offered: Every other year, Fall

GDD 390. Internship.1-3 Credits.

Under the supervision of a faculty member and a participating private company, corporation, institution or community organization, students gain real-world experience working in the field of game design. For majors or minors in game design and development. Requires permission of the program director.

Offered: Every year, All

GDD 395. Critical Game Studies Seminar (PL 395).3 Credits.

In this course, students address topics in game studies, ludology or play theory to develop critical, conceptual and cultural understandings of narrative, meaning and identity in games. The course also addresses the design and development of serious and meaningful games and the aesthetic, social and technological implications of new emerging forms. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of the program director.

Prerequisites: Take GDD 101 or PL 101;
Offered: Every year, Fall

GDD 396. Games, Learning & Society.3 Credits.

This course addresses the design and use of serious and meaningful games in education and the relationship of digital games to important trends in teaching, learning and literacy. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of the program director.

Offered: Every year, Spring

GDD 399. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Under the supervision of a faculty member, students pursue self-directed research and in-depth study in a subject that is not covered by the existing curriculum.

Offered: As needed

GDD 402. Game Art III.3 Credits.

Students continue with more advanced work using software tools required for designing and building 3D assets. Topics include techniques of advanced 3D modeling, texturing, lighting, motion capture and animation, scene planning, virtual camera angles, rendering, editing and compositing.

Prerequisites: Take GDD 302;
Offered: Every year, Fall

GDD 405. Game Audio Design.3 Credits.

This course covers sound design for games while exploring techniques of digital sound synthesis, recording, sampling and editing. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of program director.

Prerequisites: Take GDD 200;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

GDD 410. Game Lab V: Team Projects (FVI 410).3 Credits.

Game Lab V and VI forms a two-course sequence that builds upon the knowledge and skills of prior courses. With a focus on the process of iteration this course extends the experience of game production, coding, prototyping and playtesting gained in previous Game Labs. Prerequisite: For game design and development majors; requires senior status and GDD 211 or permission of the program director.

Prerequisites: Take GDD 211 and senior status;
Offered: Every year, Fall

GDD 411. Game Lab VI: Team Projects.3 Credits.

This course is an continuation of Game Lab V. At the end of the semester, teams present a working game and provide documentation of their design and development process. Prerequisite: For game design and development majors; requires senior status and GDD 410 or permission of the program director.

Prerequisites: Take GDD 410;
Offered: Every year, Spring

GDD 490. Internship.1-3 Credits.

Under the supervision of a faculty member and a participating private company, corporation, institution or community organization, students gain real-world experience working in the field of game design. For majors or minors in game design and development. Requires permission of the program director.

Offered: Every year, All

GDD 495. Senior Project and Seminar I.3 Credits.

This course is the senior capstone in the major. Students reflect on how their academic experience and extracurricular activity during their undergraduate years have shaped their personal goals and aspirations. By applying this knowledge and using their skills to develop a portfolio, website, resume and other professional materials, reflect their chosen track in game design or game art, students define a pathway forward for their careers after graduation. Requires senior status or permission of the program director.

Offered: Every year, Spring

GDD 499. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Under the supervision of a faculty member, students pursue self-directed research and in-depth study in a subject that is not covered by the existing curriculum. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

Offered: As needed

Music (MU)

MU 110. Private Music Lessons.1 Credit.

Music lessons give Quinnipiac students the opportunity to study the piano, voice, harp or woodwind instruments with a highly skilled musical professional. In private music lessons, students develop an understanding of the fundamental elements of playing a musical instrument. These include: musical notation, proper technique, music theory and performance. No prior musical training is required as lessons are tailored by the instructor to be appropriate for any level of study. Students may choose to perform in program recitals that are held each semester.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

MU 130. Understanding Music.3 Credits.

Students study elements of musical form and style in an effort to discover how music works. This course investigates the most important figures from the history of Western music as well as some world music and contemporary composers.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

MU 130H. Honors Understanding Music.3 Credits.

In this music appreciation course, students study elements of musical forms and styles together with necessary historical background. Frequent direct listening is involved.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

MU 150. American Popular Music: From the Blues to Hip Hop.3 Credits.

This course includes a survey of the musical and cultural history of the diverse styles and artists associated with American popular music. Exploration ranges from rock to blues to hip-hop to heavy metal to country. The course includes a study of the music alongside the social, cultural, political and historical contexts in which they emerged.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Fine Arts

MU 175. Special Topics in Music.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

MU 190. Quinnipiac University Singers.1 Credit.

This workshop in music is devoted to the study, singing and presentation of choral music from a variety of periods. The course focuses on specific vocal and ensemble techniques. Students of every experience and ability level are encouraged to attend.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

MU 191. Hamden Symphony Orchestra at Quinnipiac.1 Credit.

Students perform chamber music and orchestral compositions. A wide variety of styles including classical, film and popular music are performed. All instruments are used and students of every experience and ability level are encouraged to attend.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

MU 192. Quinnipiac University Hand Bell Choir.1 Credit.

Offered: As needed, All

MU 194. Jazz Ensemble.1 Credit.

Students explore and perform literature written for the big and small ensemble. A wide variety of styles, composers and arrangers are covered. Students of every experience and ability level are encouraged to attend.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

MU 199. Independent Study.1-3 Credits.

MU 200. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed, All
UC: Fine Arts

MU 210. History of Musical Drama: from Opera to Broadway.3 Credits.

This course is a survey of the history of music in theatrical productions from the beginning of opera in late 16th-century Italy to light opera to modern opera and musicals. Students examine selected works against the background of a changing cultural, aesthetic and political world.

Offered: As needed, Fall
UC: Fine Arts

MU 211. History of Jazz.3 Credits.

This course covers the origins and history of the jazz idiom from its early beginning through present avant-garde forms. Basic jazz literature is surveyed with style analysis of important soloists, small jazz groups and large ensembles.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

MU 211H. Honors History of Jazz.3 Credits.

This course covers the origins and history of the jazz idiom from its early beginning through present avant-garde forms. Basic jazz literature is surveyed with style analysis of important soloists, small jazz groups and large ensembles.

Offered: Every year, All

MU 212. History of Song.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed, All

MU 213. Music of the 20th Century.3 Credits.

This course examines the many transformations that have taken place in art music from the late post-romantic era up to the present time. The course presents a diverse spectrum of musical styles, and explores how popular forms, world music, and changes in society have impacted musical culture here and abroad.

Prerequisites: Take 3credits from subject MU;
Offered: Every year, Spring
UC: Fine Arts

MU 230. Music Theory I.3 Credits.

This course is specifically designed to give the student a solid and practical basis for appreciation or participation in musical experience. Emphasis is placed on development in three areas: 1) music theory (rhythm, melody, harmony, modes, scales, key signatures, intervals, etc.); 2) its direct application through exercises in dictation; and 3) sight reading.

Prerequisites: Take MU 130;
Offered: Every year, Fall
UC: Fine Arts

MU 250. Music and Disabilities.3 Credits.

This course explores how specific disabilities contributed to the formation of a composer or performer's musical identity. This course places special emphasis on how disabilities influence creative and performance standards within a culture. Students discuss musicians from many different genres, including classical, jazz and pop music.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Fine Arts

MU 280. Music and Our Life's Work.4 Credits.

The objective of this course is to empower students with information that will help them understand and appreciate various genres of music and their connection to our life's work. Utilizing a group cooperative learning approach, we will engage in directed listening activities and investigation of select Western Art Music examples. We will explore the societal and historical influences that have contributed to the development of music, as well as the effect of music on our daily lives. For their culminating project, "Music and Your Major," students will articulate the relationship of music to the work that they do.

Offered: As needed

MU 299. Independent Study.1-3 Credits.

By special arrangement with instructor and with approval of department chair.

Offered: Every year, All

MU 330. Music Theory II.3 Credits.

This course studies the range, timbre, transposition and uses of various instruments in consort. Fundamental techniques of arranging, vocal and instrumental are considered.

Prerequisites: Take MU 230
Offered: Every year, Spring

MU 399. Independent Study.3 Credits.

By special arrangement with instructor and with approval of department chair.

Offered: Every year, All

MU 499. Independent Study - Music.1-3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

Theater (DR)

DR 101. Understanding Theater.3 Credits.

This course presents an introduction to the practices and purposes of theater through play going, readings in theater history, dramatic theory and stage production work.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

DR 140. Stagecraft.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the theory, techniques, materials and equipment of theater technology. Participants focus on the principles and practice of set and costume construction, scenery painting, tools and their safe usage, technical production organization and management. Materials are presented in a lecture format with extensive practical work, which is arranged by the instructor on an individual student basis (usually 2 hours per week). As part of the course, students are required to participate in technical production work for two productions during the semester.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Fine Arts

DR 150. Performance Fundamentals.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to those basic vocal, physical and improvisational skills necessary for successful performance in a variety of areas. Skills to be emphasized include vocal support and projection, physical relaxation and focus, diction, articulation and improvisational techniques. Students interested in broadcast journalism, newscasting, public relations and advocacy, as well as more theatrical areas of public performance, learn to work effectively in front of an audience while maintaining focus and energy.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Fine Arts

DR 160. Acting I.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the basic principles of acting, including scene analysis, motivation, intention and character work. Students perform exercises, monologues and scenes.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Fine Arts

DR 181. Improvisational Acting.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to long-form improvisational theater. In this form, actors build scenes from scratch with only a one-word suggestion from the audience. This course is an introductory course and is suitable for students with or without prior performance experience.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Fine Arts

DR 191. Theater Practice I.1-4 Credits.

All basic theater components through the active production of a full-length play are studied in this course. Students may participate as actors, designers, stage managers, assistant directors, dramaturges and in various production roles. (Minimum 40 hours production work.) Requires permission of instructor.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

DR 199. Independent Study.1-3 Credits.

A student may, in collaboration with an instructor, create course which focuses on specific area of dramatic study. Internships and work on university theater program productions are possible areas of focus.

Offered: As needed, All

DR 200. Special Topics.3 Credits.

This course focuses on a specialized area of theater study. Past topics have included scenic and lighting design and special topics in theater history and dramatic literature. Course may be repeated for credit.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

DR 210. Hands On: An Introduction to Puppetry.3 Credits.

Students learn the art of puppetry by studying the theory and history of the form. They actively participate in the creation and manipulation of various forms of puppets. Prerequisite is waived if student has taken any 100- or 200-level studio art course.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

DR 220. Voice and Movement.3 Credits.

This course covers practical laboratory work in vocal production and movement, utilizing developmental techniques of Kristen Linklater, Alexander Feldenkrais, Jerzy Grotowski, Michael Chekhov, with special emphasis on individual coaching and problem solving. Studio work also may include techniques of characterization, including neutral and character mask exploration, work with classical texts, and acquisition of dialect skills.

Offered: Every year, Fall
UC: Fine Arts

DR 230. Directing for the Theater.3 Credits.

This course serves as an introduction to the craft of the theatrical director. Topics include play analysis and interpretation, director's concept, visual composition and the history and theories of directing. Also included: methods of actor coaching, rehearsal techniques and working with the creative team of designers, dramaturges and production staff. As a final project, each student directs a scene or one-act play that is presented in a student workshop performance at the end of the semester.

Offered: Every year, Spring
UC: Fine Arts

DR 257. Design for the Theater.3 Credits.

An introductory course that explores the basic theories and principles that affect scenic, costume, lighting, and sound design. This course is suitable for students with or without prior theater experience.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

DR 260. Acting for Film/TV.3 Credits.

This is an intermediate studio course in which students gain experience in the specialized performance skills demanded by the film and television mediums. Students work on monologues and scenes that emphasize truth and emotional reality and receive training in the techniques of Stanislavski, Lee Strasberg and Sanford Meisner. When scheduling permits, students in Drama 260 collaborate with a mass communications video production class in filming/taping acting scenes.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

DR 270. World Theater History & Dramatic Literature I.3 Credits.

In this course, students integrate a multicultural history of world theater with the study of performance traditions and dramatic literature. Participants study the ritual foundations of theater through the theater of the early Renaissance period, emphasizing the importance of historical and literary research in devising actual production concepts for period plays. Students apply their knowledge in active and creative projects. Does not have to be taken in sequence with DR 275.

Offered: Every other year, Spring
UC: Fine Arts

DR 270H. Honors World Theater History and Dramatic Literature I.3 Credits.

In this course, students integrate a multicultural history of world theater with the study of performance traditions and dramatic literature. Participants study the ritual foundations of theater through the theater of the early Renaissance period, emphasizing the importance of historical and literary research in devising actual production concepts for period plays. Students apply their knowledge in active and creative projects. Does not have to be taken in sequence with DR 275.

DR 275. World Theater History & Dramatic Literature II.3 Credits.

Students trace the development of theater from the Renaissance through the late 19th century and the beginning of modern drama. This study of performance traditions and dramatic literature emphasizes the importance of locating dramatic literature within its cultural, social and historical contexts. The historical development of theatre architecture, stage craft, acting theory, and the changing status of the theatre artist is explored. Does not have to be taken in sequence with DR 270.

Offered: Every other year, Spring
UC: Fine Arts

DR 286. Comparative Drama/ Play Analysis.3 Credits.

Selected motifs and structures in drama are examined. Plays with common themes are compared in order to illuminate differing playwriting strategies. Comparative method cuts across rigid chronological and geographic compartments. The course includes visits to area theaters.

Offered: Every Third Year, Fall
UC: Fine Arts

DR 290. Acting for Classical Stage.3 Credits.

This intermediate studio course emphasizes the performance skills necessary to execute a classical role. Students work on monologues and scenes drawn from the plays of the Greek tragedians, Shakespeare, Moliere and the writers of the English Restoration. Students acquire the techniques necessary to speak verse and to physically embody a classical character.

Offered: Every Third Year, Fall
UC: Fine Arts

DR 291. Theater Practice II.3 Credits.

All basic theater components through the active production of a full-length play are studied in this course. Students may participate as actors, designers, stage managers, assistant directors, dramaturges and in other production roles. (Minimum 80 hours of student involvement, rehearsal journal and research project). Requires permission of instructor.

Offered: Every year, All

DR 299. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

This intermediate level tutorial course stresses independent investigation of a topic in theater/drama selected in consultation with the instructor. One conference weekly; oral and written reports. Course may be repeated for credit.

Offered: As needed, All

DR 300. Special Topics.3 Credits.

This advanced level seminar explores a specific area of theater practice, literature or history. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

DR 305. Theater for Young Audiences (ED 362).3 Credits.

This seminar course allows students to explore various aspects of creating theater for young audiences. Performance skills in improvisation and creative dramatics, adaptation of fairy tales, folklore and other children's literature for plays, and the integration of drama into classroom curriculum are emphasized. Students conduct enrichment workshops at participating area schools and/or perform for young audiences in staged readings, workshops and/or fully mounted productions. Community outreach and service learning are emphasized. Requires permission of instructor. This course may be repeated for credit.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

DR 307. Drafting & Rendering for Theater.3 Credits.

This studio course explores the graphic techniques used by theatrical designers. Students learn to implement architectural lettering, generate hand drafting of ground plans and detail drawings, and effectively master color blending, rendered painting of surface materials, and three-dimensional rendering. Students use acrylic paints and pencil drafting tools. During the course, students build a professional portfolio of work.

Offered: Every other year, Spring
UC: Fine Arts

DR 310. Laboratory in Theater and Community.3 Credits.

Students investigate the potential for theater and performance to be catalysts for social change. The class explores how theater has been an effective site for cultural and political interventions. Moving from theory to practice in the staging of a socially-resonant piece of theater, students explore the ways in which theater may be used to articulate community conflict and to facilitate dialogue, and also examine the practical and ethical issues confronted by those who engage in theater for social change. This course is repeatable for credit.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

DR 320. Advanced Voice and Movement.3 Credits.

This course includes advanced laboratory work in voice, movement and characterization for the actor with emphasis on improvisation, neutral and character mask exploration, work with classical texts including Shakespeare, familiarity with the international phonetic alphabet (IPA), acquisition of dialect skills, and introduction to Viewpoints compositional techniques.

Prerequisites: Take DR 220;
Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

DR 325. Theater Seminar.3 Credits.

Students explore artistic, dramaturgical and production issues associated with the realization of a regional theater's season. Students read scripts produced during a particular semester by an area professional theater and attend technical/dress rehearsals and performances. Guest artists from the theater visit campus. Students also attend symposiums and other outreach programming offered by the theater. The seminar provides a forum for discussing the multifaceted process of selecting a regional theater season, formulating production concepts, conducting dramaturgical research, assembling artistic teams and realizing dramatic texts on stage.

Prerequisites: Take DR 101;
Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

DR 330. Advanced Directing.3 Credits.

DR 330 is an advanced course in the theory and practice of directing for the stage. Students study the art of directing by examining the writings and work of major theorists and directors of the 20th century. Topics include directing theories and aesthetics, style, varied rehearsal techniques and practices, and other problems in directing. The process of directing also is studied through the experience of directing a one-act or full-length play for public performance. Classroom discussion focuses on works in progress, with special emphasis on the problems of translating a text to the stage; working with actors, designers, playwrights; composition and creating stage business; rhythm.

Prerequisites: Take DR 230;
Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

DR 335. Musical Theater Performance.3 Credits.

In this studio course, students gain expertise in the special skills and techniques necessary to perform in the musical theater style. Each student performs solo, duet and trio musical theater selections with CD accompaniment. (Music is provided; however, students may choose a different solo piece, provided they have the accompaniment track or access to a pianist.) As a culminating exercise, students select pieces drawn from the semester's performance exercises, and these pieces are performed with appropriate costumes, props and choreography in a public cabaret setting.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

DR 340. Scenic Design.3 Credits.

This course explores the principles of scenic design with emphasis on drawing, painting, drafting and model making. Students develop three-dimensional design solutions for an array of scenic situations through the conceptualization of spatial relationships.

Offered: Every other year, Fall
UC: Fine Arts

DR 341. Lighting Design for the Theater.3 Credits.

This course provides hands-on experience with the technical and design elements of stage lighting. Students use equipment and techniques directly relating to the theatrical productions scheduled in a given semester, using an artistic and collaborative approach and working with lighting systems in a theater.

Offered: Every other year, Spring
UC: Fine Arts

DR 342. Costume Design.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the theory, techniques, materials and equipment of costuming. Participants focus on costume construction, fabric, fasteners, sewing machine use, dyeing techniques and costume design. Extensive practical work is completed on an individual student basis. Students participate in costume construction for two productions during the semester.

Offered: Every other year, Fall
UC: Fine Arts

DR 345. Dance for the Musical Theater.3 Credits.

Students learn musical theater dance styles and choreography through studio performance. As a culminating exercise, students select dance pieces to perform with appropriate costumes, props and choreography in a cabaret setting open to the public.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

DR 350. Playwriting.3 Credits.

The course explores a wide range of playwriting strategies, exercises in technique and innovative methods through which new playwrights may begin to develop an individual voice and unique style capable of communicating their visions. Students read well-known plays of the modern era, analyzing the ways in which individual playwrights have employed conventional and unconventional structures in telling their stories. Students also complete a series of writing exercises designed to develop specific skills. As a culminating exercise, each student produces an original, one-act play.

Prerequisites: Take EN 101;
Offered: Every year, Fall
UC: Fine Arts

DR 360. Advanced Acting.3 Credits.

In this advanced studio course, student actors use exercises in acting technique to deepen and refine their ability to create reality on stage. The techniques portion of the class consists of exercises and theories drawn from the work and writings of Stanislavski, Strasberg, Meisner, Hagen, Adler, Lewis and Chekhov. Students explore the skills necessary to create a sense of truth on stage, whether working with realistic texts or those drawn from non-realistic and classical theater.

Prerequisites: Take DR 160;
Offered: Every other year, Fall
UC: Fine Arts

DR 370. Internship in Theater Administration, Production, Performance, Education or Theater and Community.3 Credits.

Junior or senior theater majors complete a semester-long or summer-long internship in their focus area. Possible internship sites include education and humanities departments of regional and professional theaters, public schools, social service agencies, administration and production departments of professional and regional theaters; and professional theaters in the New York/New England area offering internship programs in performance. Junior or senior status in the major required.

Offered: Every year, Fall

DR 375. History and Dramatic Literature of the Contemporary Theater.3 Credits.

This advanced seminar class encompasses a socio-historical study of dramatic literature and theory from the beginnings of the modern era to the present with an emphasis on relevance to contemporary performance techniques. The course examines such movements as realism, naturalism, futurism, symbolism, expressionism, surrealism, constructivism and absurdism, studying the texts, artists and critics of the modernist and post-modernist movements in an attempt to locate contemporary theater within its social, historical and political contexts.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

DR 380. Theater Administration.3 Credits.

Students explore the economic, legal, and managerial aspects of professional theater. Course will examine the roles of producers, managers, agents, house managers, box office managers as well as the responsibilities of marketing, programming, touring, public relations, strategic planning, and fundraising. Final project will require students to develop a strategic and creative plan for their own performing arts center. This is the first in a three-course series designed to prepare students for dynamic careers in arts administration and the entertainment industry.

Offered: As needed
UC: Fine Arts

DR 386. Modern Drama.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to principal movements in continental, British and American drama from Ibsen to the present. Emphasis is on the main currents of modern dramatic development through the critical analysis of representative plays.

Offered: As needed

DR 386H. Honors-Modern Drama.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to principal movements in continental, British and American drama from Ibsen to the present. Emphasis is on the main currents of modern dramatic development through the critical analysis of representative plays.

Offered: As needed

DR 391. Theater Practice III.3 Credits.

All basic theater components through the active production of a full-length play are studied in this course. Students play substantial roles in the production, either acting in a major role or taking on a major production responsibility (e.g., stage manager, assistant director, student designer). (Minimum 120 hours of student involvement, rehearsal journal and substantive dramaturgical/research project). Requires permission of instructor.

Offered: Every year, All

DR 399. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

This advanced tutorial course stresses in-depth, independent investigation of a topic in theater selected in consulation with the instructor. A significant amount of research and writing is required.

Offered: As needed, All

DR 410. Senior Project.3 Credits.

This senior project in the theater major's chosen focus area may be research, production or performance-based, but must entail both analytic and creative endeavor involving substantial research, analysis and writing. A public presentation or performance is required. Depending upon their focus area, theater majors may opt to complete DR 300 Laboratory in Theater and Community as the senior project. A directed study, this course is the capstone experience for all theater majors. Prerequisite: Senior standing in the major.

Offered: As needed