Department of History

The Department of History provides an intensive program of study for students majoring in history. The study of history is a long-established foundation for education since it builds critical skills of gathering and interpreting evidence, crafting arguments, engaging in research and developing polished presentations both written and oral. As a result, students earning a degree in history are prepared to pursue a wide range of career options. Some continue their education in graduate school in the humanities, social sciences, education or law; others pursue careers in public service, business and the arts.

The Department of History provides opportunities for all students at Quinnipiac to familiarize themselves with the past through the study of history across time and around the world. Studying history helps students to appreciate their place in the world through a deeper understanding of the connection between the past and the present, through a better awareness of the variety of human experience, and through a more complete understanding of the rich diversity of cultures.

The faculty regularly reviews and updates the history curriculum to reflect the changing nature of the historical discipline; conducts exit interviews with graduating seniors to assess their experience in the major; and collects and updates survey information from graduates concerning their experiences after graduation.

The mission of the Department of History is twofold. First, it provides an intensive program of study for students majoring in history. Second, the Department of History provides opportunities for all students at Quinnipiac to familiarize themselves with the past through the study of history across time and around the world.

History (HS)

HS 111. The Rise of the West.3 Credits.

Beginning with the origins of Western civilizations in the ancient Near East, students examine the development of Western culture and society from its beginnings through the 16th century, with emphasis on the nature and values of three successive polities: the classical world of Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, and the origins of the modern world in the Renaissance/Reformation. Consideration is given to the idea of "the West" and its interaction with and contact with non-Western cultures and peoples.

Offered: Every year, All

HS 111H. Honors The Rise of the West.3 Credits.

Beginning with the origins of Western civilizations in the ancient Near East, students examine the development of Western culture and society from its beginnings through the 16th century, with emphasis on the nature and values of three successive polities: the classical world of Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, and the origins of the modern world in the Renaissance/Reformation. Consideration is given to the idea of "the West" and its interaction with and contact with non-Western cultures and peoples.

Offered: As needed

HS 112. The West in the World.3 Credits.

Beginning with the emergence of the modern state in the 16th century, students examine the social, political, economic and cultural developments of Western civilization and its interaction with the rest of the world. Emphasis is on the growth of science and technology in the 17th century, the emergence of the Enlightenment in the 18th century, the age of industrialization, nationalism and imperialism, social upheaval in the 19th century, the domination of the West over the worlds and challenges to that domination during the 20th century.

Offered: Every year, All

HS 112H. Honors The West and The World.3 Credits.

Beginning with the emergence of the modern state in the 16th century, students examine the social, political, economic and cultural developments of Western civilization and its interaction with the rest of the world. Emphasis is on the growth of science and technology in the 17th century, the emergence of the Enlightenment in the 18th century, the age of industrialization, nationalism and imperialism, social upheaval in the 19th century, the domination of the West over the worlds and challenges to that domination during the 20th century.

Offered: As needed

HS 122. Modern World History.3 Credits.

This course examines key developments in world history beginning in roughly 1300 with the rise of the Turco-Mongol Empires and ending with the nationalist and independence movements of the 20th century. Students examine and analyze major events that occurred in the non-Western world. Special attention is paid to South Asia, East Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Students gain a better understanding of the history and culture of these regions, as well how the non-Western world has impacted the global community, both past and present.

Offered: Every year, All

HS 131. U.S. History to 1877.3 Credits.

This course traces the formation and expansion of the American nation from Colonial settlement through Reconstruction using selected episodes. Themes explored include the development of a national identity, models of citizenship, the role of government, and divisions based upon gender, ethnicity, race and class.

Offered: Every year, All

HS 132. U.S. History Since Reconstruction.3 Credits.

This course explores the evolution of the American people and their nation through the major political, social and economic changes of the late 19th century to the present. Key themes include changing expectations of governance, the quest to achieve the full promise of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. ascent to global hegemony.

Offered: Every year, All

HS 200. Special Topics in History.3 Credits.

This course includes readings and discussion of historical topics of special interest to students enrolled in the course.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 200H. Honors Special Topics in History.3 Credits.

This course includes readings and discussion of historical topics of special interest to students enrolled in the course.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 201. Historical Writing.1 Credit.

The practice of history is founded on the ability to write clearly. In this intensive writing seminar, students are introduced to the fundamentals of historical writing, including the basics of grammar and sentence structure, the construction of good paragraphs and the crafting of a historical narrative. Since writing and thinking are intimately linked, students also practice the art of historical thinking, including the development of historical arguments, the critical use of historical sources and the appropriate use of historical documentation using the Chicago Manual of Style. Majors only.

Offered: As needed

HS 202. Introduction to Public History.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the field of public history. There are a variety of opinions on what constitutes public history, but generally it is considered to be the presentation of history to broad audiences outside the traditional classroom setting. The practice and presentation of history along these lines usually takes the form of museum exhibition, historic preservation, cultural/historic resource management, public programming, documentary film and oral history, but it is hardly limited to these areas. This course aims to introduce students to these exciting possibilities, and to appreciate the ever-widening scope of the public historian in the new media age.

Offered: Every year, Fall

HS 208. Twentieth-Century World History.3 Credits.

This course covers the history of the world since the 19th century focusing on the experiences and perspectives of the non-Western world. Students study the rise of nationalism, the disintegration of empires, and the growth of communal and ethnic strife across the globe in the 20th century.

Prerequisites: Take FYS 101 or one 100-level history course .
Offered: Every year, All

HS 209. Twentieth-Century Europe.3 Credits.

Events in Europe during the 20th century radically transformed the world. The century began, and perhaps ended, in periods of vibrant intellectual, social and cultural development and optimism. In between these eras, however, Europe was at the center of the two bloodiest wars humanity has ever known and the rise of brutal totalitarian states. Students examine the complex cross currents in European society during the period roughly from the 1890s to the present, focusing on the political, social, intellectual and economic developments in European society that helped shape this turbulent century. Students also learn about the impact of non-European peoples, particularly those of Africa and Asia, on internal European developments.

Prerequisites: Take FYS 101 or one 100-level history course.
Offered: Every year, All

HS 210. Contemporary America.3 Credits.

This survey of American history from 1945 to the present focuses on both social and political matters. Students study topics including the McCarthy era and the nuclear age, the civil and women's rights movements, Nixon and the Watergate crisis, gay liberation, the Reagan revolution and end of the Cold War, and the era of American global dominance and its challenges. Particular attention is given to the impact of the diverse cultures and peoples that have emerged in contemporary American society.

Prerequisites: Take FYS 101 or one 100-level history course .
Offered: Every year, All

HS 210H. Honors Contemporary America.3 Credits.

This survey of American history from 1945 to the present focuses on both domestic and foreign policy matters including the Cold War, the McCarthy era, the civil rights movement, the "great society," Vietnam, Nixon and the Watergate crisis.

Offered: Every year, All

HS 211. Popular Culture in American History.3 Credits.

This course focuses on an interpretation of American history through popular culture. Samples of popular culture materials in various historical periods are examined with special attention to music, film, television, and sports.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, All

HS 213. The Roman World.3 Credits.

This course examines the historical evolution of Rome which, through its laws, language, literature and institutions, has strongly influenced the modern world. How did the Romans win their Empire? What was the character of these people? And what was the essence of the Roman achievement?

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 215. American Business History.3 Credits.

Students examine American business history from the mercantile era to the decline of laissez faire, with particular attention to New England. Topics include America as a developing economy: trade, commerce and the transportation revolution; the Industrial Revolution and the American system of manufacture; the managerial revolution and the growth of labor unrest; Progressivism, the cult of efficiency, and the decline of laissez faire.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 220. American Environmental History.3 Credits.

This course examines American society's interaction with nature since the arrival of Europeans in the 15th century. Students consider the intentions and values that guided the use of America's natural resources and the transformation of its landscape. While this historical legacy is most apparent in America's agricultural, industrial and conservation activities, it has been equally profound in the rise of America's environmental movement, tourism, recreation, ecological research and global environmental awareness. Since we are located in the New England/Mid-Atlantic region, this course occasionally departs from the broad survey of American environmental history and treats issues that are particularly germane to the region.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

HS 227. Russian Cultural and Intellectual History.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to changing concepts of authority and the role of reason in the ordering of social and cultural values, the cultural mission of Russian Orthodoxy, the growth of a secular cultural elite, and the modern struggle to define individual and community and values in literature. This course includes readings in Russian thought and literature.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: As needed

HS 228. Twentieth-Century Russia.3 Credits.

This course considers Russian politics, society and culture in the 20th century, the Soviets in world affairs, and changing American views of the former Soviet Union.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: As needed

HS 229. Irish History.3 Credits.

This examination of Irish history from the pre-Christian Celtic era to modern times focuses on the changing character of Irish culture reflected in literary, political and religious documents. Special consideration is given to the origins of modern political and sectarian conflicts through a consideration of the history of Anglo-Irish relations, particularly the ramifications of the Tudor conquest, the Great Hunger and the rise of Irish nationalism.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: Every year, Spring

HS 230. The Rise of Modern Science.3 Credits.

In this course students explore the development of modern science since Copernicus and the impact that science has had on our world in the past four centuries. Students examine the major historical developments in astronomy, physics, chemistry, biology and medicine over the past 400 years. They also explore the complex interaction of science with society especially its contact with issues in religion, politics and gender. No specific background in science in required.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: As needed

HS 231. The World of Tudor/Stuart Britain.3 Credits.

This course explores early modern Britain from the establishment of the Tudor monarchy in 1485 until the end of the Stuart kings with the Glorious Revolution of 1688. Areas of focus include: Henry VIII, the Reformation, Elizabeth I, Shakespeare's London, Scotland's witch trials, and the English Civil War. Through exposure to and examination of primary source documents and historical interpretations, students come to see how the history of early modern Britain holds foundations for the modern world.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

HS 232. The Rise and Fall of the British Empire.3 Credits.

This course analyzes the expansion, consolidation, workings and eventual disintegration of the British Empire from the 17th century until its collapse in the 20th century. It touches on the colonial experiences of North America, the West Indies, India, China, the Middle East, Australia, Ireland and Africa. Students examine the emergence of nationalism in the colonized regions. Special emphasis is placed on how the major colonies were affected by the international imperial context, as well as the contributions that subject peoples and cultures made to colonial history and the trajectory of the empire.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

HS 235. History of Modern China/Asian Studies.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the political and social institutions of China, schools of thought, legal and moral concepts and literary, artistic and intellectual developments, elements of stability and change and international contacts to recent times.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course;
Offered: Every year, All

HS 236. History of Modern Japan/Asian Studies.3 Credits.

This course considers the historical background of modern Japan; period of seclusion; restoration of a centralized monarchy; economic and political developments, establishment of an empire and World War II and postwar period.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: Every year, All

HS 241. African-American Experiences to Reconstruction.3 Credits.

This course examines the history of the United States by looking at African-American experiences up to the end of the 19th century. Using a wide array of primary materials from songs to autobiographies to speeches, in print and audiovisual forms, students explore how people of African descent conceptualized and constructed their identities and navigated their struggles against inequalities. A central theme is that people of African descent living in America created themselves under circumstances of inhumanity, exploitation and oppression.

Offered: Every Third Year, Fall

HS 242. African-American Experience Since Reconstruction.3 Credits.

Although emancipation and reconstruction amendments ended a particular set of oppression and exploitation, the legal conferral of citizenship for African Americans neither ended institutional racism nor secured the redistribution of resources that had hitherto entrenched inequalities, prejudices and the denial of opportunities to black people. In this course, students examine how African Americans cultivated, expressed and debated the possibilities of, and alternatives to, equal inclusion and participation in American democracy and society in the last three decades of the 19th century and throughout the 20th century.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: Every Third Year, Spring

HS 254. Colonial Latin America.3 Credits.

This course offers an introduction and examination of the history of Latin America and its people from Pre-Columbian times through independence. The course focuses on both the indigenous and European peoples and the many consequences of their interactions. Some areas of examination include European expansion and conquest, the impact on and reactions of indigenous populations, the formation of a colonial society, issues of race, ethnicity, class, and gender, and the establishment of economic and political structures.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, All

HS 271. History of Southeast Asia 1.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the cultures and history of the countries and people of Southeast Asia. The course covers pre-European, Colonial, and post-Colonial periods, with emphasis on the developments and problems since World War II. First semester: the islands.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 272. History of Southeast Asia 2.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the cultures and history of the countries and people of Southeast Asia. The course covers pre-European, Colonial, and post-Colonial periods, with emphasis on the developments and problems since World War II. Second semester: mainland countries.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 273. African History and Culture.3 Credits.

This course presents an introduction to traditional African culture and the different patterns of historical development south of the Sahara. Topics include the role of trade in the rise of Sudanic and East Coast civilizations, diversity of political European presence before and after the partition of Africa, and contemporary trends since independence.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 274. History of India.3 Credits.

This course examines the history of the South Asian subcontinent from the ancient to the modern period. Students examine broad outlines of historical developments in the ancient and medieval periods, and conduct a more in-depth study of the modern period, beginning with the establishment of the Mughal Empire in approximately 1526. The course presents key historiographical debates on the history of the subcontinent, such as early Islamic invasions, reasons for the decline of the Mughal Empire, the foundations of British rule, Hindu-Muslims relations, and the impact of the Raj on social and familial relations.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

HS 275. History of the Middle East.3 Credits.

This course analyzes the economic, cultural and political developments in the Middle East between 600 CE and 1919 CE by exploring the rise of Islam, the Umayyad and Abbasid Empires, the Ottoman Empire, and the gradual shift from Ottoman to European influence in the 19th century. It examines the rise of nationalism and the effect of World War I on the political map of the region. Emphasis is placed on "critical issues" such as the status of women, terrorism and the place of Islam. Both contemporary viewpoints and historiographical debates surrounding these issues are discussed.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

HS 286. Introduction to Medieval Europe.3 Credits.

This course provides a general overview of the Middle Ages from late Antiquity to the crises of the 14th century. It explores the period of European history that holds the foundations of much of western society. Topics of particular significance include: the Medieval Church, the rise of the university, relations with the East, the Crusades and the growth of towns and trade.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, All

HS 294. American Civilization: Prosperity and Depression in the 1920s and 1930s.3 Credits.

This course combines literary and historical interpretations of the period between the two world wars. American values and attitudes during the 1920s and 1930s are examined within six major themes: disillusionment, middle class values, conflict of race and class, the depression, rise of fascism at home and abroad, and the prewar dilemma.

Prerequisites: Take one 100-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 299. Independent Study in History.3 Credits.

Individual study of special area including internships. By agreement of the student and with prior permission of the department chairperson, the student may undertake directed readings with discussion, examination and reports as arranged by the instructor in an area of the student's interest not normally offered through scheduled courses. Available to history majors or other equally qualified students.

Offered: As needed, All

HS 300. Special Topics in American History.3 Credits.

This course focuses on readings and discussion of historical topics of special interest to students enrolled in the course.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 301. Special Topics II - European History.3 Credits.

This course focuses on readings and discussion of historical topics of special interest to students enrolled in the course.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.

HS 302. Colonizing the Body.3 Credits.

This course takes an in-depth look at the ways in which empire and imperial policies reshaped and reformulated the body of the colonized subject, setting up social categories of difference that corresponded neatly to European imperial notions of biological difference. Using India as a case study, it examines how Indian bodies were "scientifically" classified, categorized and redefined to underscore and perpetuate European political dominance. The course highlights imperial policies that buttressed certain privileged notions of racial, gendered, economic/occupational and anatomical difference.

Offered: Every year, Fall

HS 303. Historiography and Historical Methods.3 Credits.

This advanced seminar is intended for majors and other students interested in deepening their knowledge of the techniques of reading, writing, researching and interpreting history. Students get a broad introduction to the concept of historiography and consider the ways in which thinking about the past has changed over time. Students also learn the foundational skills needed for the researching and writing of history, including an introduction to basic research techniques, compilation and organization of primary and secondary source materials, and the practical and theoretical skills necessary to undertake historical writing.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every year, All

HS 305. Vietnam (COM 305).3 Credits.

This course presents a study of the Vietnam Era and draws conclusions about policy for the future. Media coverage of the war and its effect on both national policy and political change are emphasized.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course or MSS 101.
Offered: Every year, All

HS 307. The Holocaust (MSS 307).3 Credits.

Through an examination of historical texts, literature and film, this course examines the systematic destruction of 10 million human beings at the hands of the Third Reich.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course or MSS 101.
Offered: Every year, All

HS 308. U.S. Women's History (WS 308).3 Credits.

This course covers the experience of women in America before 1900. Women's work in the family and community is stressed. Individual research is required on varied topics, such as women and rural life, women and medicine, women in the professions, women and the charter of institutions, women and human rights, and women and the sea.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed

HS 309. Women in America 1920-Present (WS 309).3 Credits.

This course covers the experience of women in the 20th-century United States. Women's economic and political roles are stressed, and individual research on a specific topic is required. In past years, topics have included American women and their role in the world and women and rural life.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed

HS 310. The Ancient Near East.3 Credits.

Through lectures and readings students are introduced to civilizations of the Near East: Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Kassites, Mitannians, Babylonians, Hebrews and Assyrians. Primary emphasis is on development of chronology, rise and fall of the great empires, and origin of Western religious tradition.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed

HS 311. The Ancient Hebrews.3 Credits.

This course covers the political, social, economic and cultural treatment of the ancient Hebrews from the time of Abraham to the Roman destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 312. Ancient Greece.3 Credits.

This course examines the political, social and intellectual or cultural history of the ancient Greek world, with special focus on the period from the 8th century renaissance depicted in Homer, through the emergence and growth of city states such as Sparta and Athens, and ending with the 4th century transformation of the Mediterranean world by Alexander the Great. Emphasis is placed on the study of both literary sources, such as Herodotus, Thucydides, and Greek tragedians, and material sources, such as the Parthenon and red and black pottery.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course or PL 101.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

HS 313. The Roman World.3 Credits.

The historical evolution of Rome which, through its laws, language, literature and institutions, has strongly influenced modern Europe, is examined. How did the Romans win their empire? What was the character of these people? And what was the essence of the Roman achievement?

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 314. Europe in the Early Medieval Period, 325-842.3 Credits.

This course presents a study of the Dark Ages, the first five centuries of Europe's medieval period, which have intrigued historians as a period of decline. Factors that brought about the collapse and transformation of the civilization built by the ancients, problems that afflicted men in the barbarian West, and the birth of modern Europe are explored.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 315. Introduction to Medieval Europe: Europe in the High Middle Ages.3 Credits.

The Europe known to the 20th century, with all of its diversity of cultures has its origins in the Middle Ages-the thousand-year period that separates Christopher Columbus from Attila the Hun. This course examines those four centuries from the point of view that modern Europe's institutions, modes of behavior, character and problems passed their formative adolescent years in the medieval period.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 316. The European Renaissance.3 Credits.

This course provides a topical exploration of the period commonly referred to as the Renaissance. It explores the period known for innovations in art and literature, but also addresses the political and social backdrop of Northern Italy and beyond. Topics of particular importance include changes in literature and education, innovations in art, modes of behavior and the emergence of modern political ideas.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, All

HS 317. The European Reformation.3 Credits.

This course explores Western Christendom from the late Middle Ages through the 17th century during the Age of Reformation. The central focus of the course is religion, but since the Reformation did not occur in isolation, it addresses a variety of themes in the study of early modern Europe. The aim of this course is to understand the major figures, movements and ideas that contributed to the division of Western Christendom into numerous confessional communities.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, All

HS 318. European History, 1555-1715.3 Credits.

Students review European civilization from the Peace of Augsburg to the death of Louis XIV, including the growth of the state, the development of the bureaucracy and diplomacy, the increase in warfare and the political struggle over taxation, the scientific revolution, and the shift toward secular values.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every Third Year, All

HS 319. European History, 1715-1815.3 Credits.

This course presents a survey of "old regime," Enlightenment, French Revolution and Napoleonic eras in European history; movements of thought and culture and their social background; the feudal reaction and middle class protest in France, and national reactions to the French developments elsewhere in Europe.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every Third Year, All

HS 320. European History, 1815-1914.3 Credits.

Political, social and economic developments in Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I are examined. Legitimacy and the Concert of Europe; industrialization, liberalism, revolution, nationalism and imperialism also are considered.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every Third Year, All

HS 321. European History, 1914-1945.3 Credits.

This course presents a study of World War I and its economic, social, political and ideological consequences. The collapse of the Versailles settlement and interwar period is considered. World War II is covered, as are diplomatic and military consequences for the Cold War era.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every Third Year, All

HS 322. History of World War I.3 Credits.

The origins of World War I and the problems of mass mobilization, war aims, weaponry and political attitudes are analyzed. The major military encounters, the war as it affected non-Europeans and the diplomacy of neutrality are discussed. Emphasis is on the peace treaties and the repercussions.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 323. World War II.3 Credits.

This in-depth study of the diplomatic, political and military aspects of World War II, 1939-1945, presents the background of the war in Europe and East Asia and the course of events in all major theaters of operations. Wartime conferences and long-term outcomes are discussed.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 324. History of England to 1688.3 Credits.

This course examines some of the major political, constitutional, religious and social aspects of English history from the period of the Roman occupation to the "glorious revolution." Themes include: the evolution of kingship and government, the common law and the courts, the history of the church and the break with Rome, the development of agriculture and commerce, English overseas expansion, and the emergence of democracy.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 325. History of England: 1688 to the Present.3 Credits.

The history of the English people from the "glorious revolution" to the present is explored. Primary focus is on the major political, constitutional, religious, economic and social developments that have contributed to the making of modern Britain. Themes include: the rise of the middle class, the expanding powers of Parliament, the Industrial Revolution and the acquisition and loss of empire.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 326. Witches and Werewolves in the Early Modern World (WS 326).3 Credits.

This course explores the general belief in witchcraft and other supernatural creatures in the larger context of religion and culture in the early modern world. Participants examine how belief in the supernatural led to a widespread fear and persecution of individuals deemed witches or other consorts of the devil. Using the groundbreaking work of historians, and the primary documents of the period, this course examines the origins and processes of the witch trials. Since approximately 75 percent of those in Europe accused of witchcraft were women, the course examines how gender, misogyny and scapegoating shaped the persecution and prosecution of the more vulnerable members of premodern society. More broadly, the class examines how Christianity both affirmed and condemned these beliefs and practices and how people used "superstition" to make sense of the world around them.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

HS 327. Islamic Societies and Cultures to 1300.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the history of the Islamic peoples. The course attempts to impart an understanding of the identity, character and accomplishments of Arabic-speaking world. Particular emphasis is on the life of Muhammad, and on the political, economic, social and cultural achievements of the medieval Islamic empire.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 330. History of Western Medicine.3 Credits.

This course examines the development of the Western medical tradition from its origins in the ancient Near East to modern times. The course emphasizes an understanding of medical theory and practice in relation to larger social, intellectual and scientific developments in the West. Topics include Hippocratic and Galenic medicine, medieval medical theory and practice, the emergence of new medical ideas in the Renaissance, and the development of modern scientific medicine.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 331. The British Empire and Commonwealth.3 Credits.

Students study the expansion, consolidation, workings and eventual disintegration of the modern British Empire. The course begins in 1600, with the creation of the English East India Company. Students learn about the growth of the Empire in detail, touching on the colonial experiences of India, the West Indies, China, the Middle East and the African continent. Finally, students examine the emergence of nationalism in the colonized regions and the subsequent collapse of empire in the 20th century. Special emphasis is placed on how the major colonies were affected by British rule, as well as the contributions that subject peoples and cultures made to the unfolding of colonial history and the trajectory of Empire. Students should expect to attend lecture regularly, participate in weekly class discussions, as well as demonstrate mastery over the material in written assignments.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, All

HS 332. History of India.3 Credits.

Students examine the history of the South Asian subcontinent between 1500 and 1950, roughly. Beginning with the establishment of the Mughal Empire in approximately 1526, students critically discuss the shift from "native" empire to British rule in the 1800s, as well as look at the various challenges to British rule and the Indian independence movement of the 20th century and its effects. Along the way, students analyze key historiographical debates on the history of the subcontinent, such as the reasons for the decline of the Mughal Empire, the foundations of British rule, Hindu-Muslims relations, and the impact of the Raj on social and familial relations. Students should expect to attend lecture regularly, participate in weekly class discussions, as well as demonstrate mastery over the material in written assignments.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, All

HS 333. The Middle East, 1300-1919; Critical Issues.3 Credits.

Students analyze the economic, cultural and political developments in the Middle East between 1300 and 1919, beginning with the rise of the Ottoman Empire in roughly 1300 through the gradual shift from Ottoman to European influence in the 19th century. Students also discuss the rise of nationalism and the effect of World War I on the political map of the Middle East, paying close attention to events in Saudi Arabia and modern-day Israel. Emphasis is placed on certain "critical issues" in the study of the Middle East, such as the status of women, terrorism and the place of Islam in Middle Eastern history. Participants take a close look at both contemporary viewpoints and historiographical debates surrounding these issues. Students should expect to attend lecture regularly, participate in weekly class discussions, as well as demonstrate mastery over the material in written assignments.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, All

HS 340. The Colonial Period to 1763.3 Credits.

Through lectures and discussion of source and secondary readings, the American Colonial period to the pre-Revolutionary era is considered in all its aspects: social, political, religious and literary. Emphasis is on the increasing similarity and the approach toward unity of the several colonies.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every Third Year, All

HS 341. The American Revolution.3 Credits.

Through lectures and discussions based on source and secondary readings, this course considers American history from 1763 to 1787, the pre-Revolutionary period, military, political and theoretical aspects of the Revolution, the Confederation, and the writing of the Constitution. Emphasis is on the political thought that culminated in the creation of the Constitution.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, All

HS 342. The Early American Republic.3 Credits.

This course considers American history from 1787 to 1848. Emphasis is on the ratification of the Constitution, the administrations of Washington, Adams, Jefferson and Madison; the growth of political parties; and political action stemming from differing theoretical positions. The course also examines culture and society in "the era of good feeling" and the Jacksonian period, and considers the changing position of the average American citizen.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every Third Year, All

HS 344. Civil War and Reconstruction.3 Credits.

The economic, social and political history of the United States in the mid-19th century is examined with emphasis upon the Civil War. Also explored are long-range and immediate causes for Southern secession, the military, naval and diplomatic conflict; domestic developments North and South, 1861-65; postwar problems and the history of Reconstruction, 1865-77.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, All

HS 345. The Gilded Age and the Progressive Era.3 Credits.

This in-depth study of the major developments that influenced the emergence of modern America includes industrial and naval expansion; social, political and religious movements; and the creation of an American empire. The course also considers the impetus to reform that characterized the first two decades of the 20th century.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every Third Year

HS 346. The United States from WW I to WW II.3 Credits.

American politics, culture and society during the Great War are examined, as are the prosperous '20s, the Great Depression and the Second World War. Increasing American involvement in world affairs is considered. Differing historical interpretations of the period are studied.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, All

HS 348. The American West to 1900.3 Credits.

This course examines the history of European-American occupation and settlement of the Trans-Mississippi West from the first European contact with Native Americans to the establishment of American statehood. The interaction of diverse cultures including Native Americans, Hispanics and Asians is explored.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 349. American Maritime History.3 Credits.

This course examines America's historic activities on the world's oceans, and on the bays, rivers and Great Lakes that are within its national boundaries. Students consider the economic, cultural, political and naval uses of these bodies of water from the 16th century to the present. Within this broad framework, this course considers how Americans used marine and freshwater environments to conduct trade, build communities, engage in war and diplomacy, use nature's bounty and participate in recreational activities. These themes illuminate the value Americans placed on maritime affairs, and provide insight into the American mariner's world, the American maritime community alongshore and the rippling effects of maritime activity throughout wider American society.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, All

HS 351. The New South.3 Credits.

This course considers the social, economic and political history of the American South from 1865 to the present. The emergence of a region displaying unique characteristics while simultaneously mirroring attitudes and actions of the nation as a whole is examined. The role and impact of literature, music, religion and sports on Dixie are considered; the civil rights movement and the development of the 'Sun Belt' also are covered. The course includes readings, discussion and a course project utilizing academic technology for historical research and presentation.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 361. African History to 1850.3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the history of sub-Saharan Africa during the precolonial period, and entails a close inquiry into the major theoretical issues and conceptual questions involved in the study of African history. Classroom study is organized chronologically but focuses on several major themes: the relationship between Africa's linkages to the world and local historical dynamics on the continent; changing political structures and popular agency within them; slavery and economic transformations; gender and social change; shifting constructions of race, ethnicity, and identity; and the stakes of conceptualizing African history in the present. Particular attention is paid to a number of case studies from across the sub-Saharan African continent. Students draw upon a range of materials including secondary historical literature, primary sources and visual arts.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

HS 362. African History Since 1850.3 Credits.

Students explore the onset of colonialism in the mid-19th century; the process of colonization and the dynamics of colonialism; the roots of national liberation movements throughout the continent, and the complex and contingent process of decolonization. In considering the early postcolonial period, students investigate the economic, social and cultural landscapes of a variety of newly independent countries. They then trace the trajectories of postcolonial states through the later years of the 20th century. Finally, students conclude by reflecting upon the contemporary relevance of this history.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

HS 371. Women in the Caribbean from the Indigenous Era to Emancipation.3 Credits.

In this course, students learn that the past and history are different when viewed from women's perspectives and experiences. This course explores the experiences of women in the Caribbean from the indigenous populations to the end of slavery. Women's lives are explored in the context of larger Caribbean historical events and themes, including: the organization of indigenous societies, European conquest and settlement, the Atlantic slave trade, the slave and sugar plantation, black resistance, abolition and emancipation. Participants also explore experiences and perspectives peculiar to women, distinguishing their histories from men's histories. The class traces larger patterns and identifies shared experiences, but also pays close attention to factors that divided and diversified women's lives.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

HS 372. Women in the Caribbean since Emancipation.3 Credits.

Using discussion and reading, this course explores women "making" Caribbean history as they transitioned from slave to free societies and from colonial to independent states throughout the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Through critical analysis of women's memoirs, diaries, oral histories and visual materials, students investigate, speculate, debate and narrate women's experiences, contributions, ideas about and observations of the often tumultuous political, social, economic and cultural transformations across the Caribbean since the ending of slavery.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

HS 376. Pirates of the Caribbean.3 Credits.

Critically examining films, historical texts and works of fiction, this class explores the political, social and cultural history of piracy in the Atlantic world. Beginning with the rise of Iberian Empires in Africa and the Americas in the 16th and 17th centuries, students examine the role and importance of privateers in empire building and the struggle for global economic power among European nations. Shifting toward the Golden Age of Piracy in the 18th century, when privateers no longer enjoyed legal status as mercenaries, but were seen as outlaws, we explore merchants and their colonial allies' violent campaigns to eradicate piracy. We also investigate the inner, private worlds of piracy and probe the enduring fascination with piracy in popular culture, and the myths generated about pirates and their worlds.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

HS 377. Kinship, Culture and Slavery: Creating an African Diaspora in the Americas.3 Credits.

Students investigate the transatlantic slave trade as the primary mode by which Africans arrived in the Americas from the 15th to the 19th centuries. This class explores ideas and cultural traditions Africans brought with them to the New World, which provided a framework through which they interpreted, understood and re-created their lives in a new environment. The goal is to uncover how the African past shaped and defined Africans as they were transported across the Atlantic. Using an interdisciplinary approach, participants examine continuities and transformations of African structures and cosmology in the Diaspora.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

HS 380. Historic Preservation.3 Credits.

This introductory course in the interdisciplinary field of historic preservation aims to equip students with fundamental insight on how to handle and curate architecture, cultural landscapes and other forms of material culture in light of the principal methods, theories and philosophies (historic, social, cultural, technological and economic) that inform historic preservation practice. In sum, the course instructs students in the primary language, issues and research skills of historic preservation.

Prerequisites: Take one 200-level history course.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

HS 389. History Elective.3 Credits.

HS 391. Colonizing the Body.4 Credits.

This course takes an in-depth look at the ways in which empire and imperial policies reshaped and reformulated the body of the colonized subject, setting up social categories of difference that corresponded neatly to European imperial notions of biological difference. Using India as a case study, it examines how Indian bodies were "scientifically" classified, categorized and redefined to underscore and perpetuate European political dominance. The course highlights imperial policies that buttressed certain privileged notions of racial, gendered, economic/occupational and anatomical difference.

Offered: Every year, Fall

HS 394. Doctors, Disease, and Death in the Western World.4 Credits.

In this course, students learn about the complex and varied history of health, healing, disease and death in the Western world from the time of the ancient Egyptians to modern day. This course is thematic in its focus. Students study various aspects of the history of medicine and through that study come to a better understanding of the biological, social, intellectual, cultural and institutional contexts in which the process of living and dying has been constructed in the Western experience.

Offered: Every year, Spring

HS 399. Independent Study in History.3 Credits.

Individual study of special area including internships. By agreement of the student and with prior permission of the department chairperson, the student may undertake directed readings with discussion, examination and reports as arranged by the instructor in an area of the student's interest not normally offered through scheduled courses. Available to history majors or other equally qualified students.

Offered: As needed, All

HS 400. Special Topics in History.3 Credits.

This course includes readings and discussion of historical topics of special interest to students enrolled in the course.

Prerequisites: Take one 300-level history course.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 408. Seminars in History.3 Credits.

Seminars are taught by members of the department in areas of their special competence. Topics are selected in consultation with juniors in the major. Emphasis is on organization and presentation of research. Open to second-semester juniors and seniors in the major and to other qualified upperclassmen by permission of department and instructor.

Prerequisites: Take HS 303.
Offered: Every year, All

HS 409. Honors Essay in History.3 Credits.

Honors projects are available to second-semester seniors who have taken HS 408 and have been admitted to candidacy for honors in history by the department.

Prerequisites: Take HS 408.
Offered: As needed, All

HS 499. Independent Study in History.3 Credits.

Individual study of special area including internships. By agreement of the student and with prior permission of the department chairperson, the student may undertake directed readings with discussion, examination and reports as arranged by the instructor in an area of the student's interest not normally offered through scheduled courses. Available to history majors or other equally qualified students.

Offered: As needed, All

HS 500. Special Topics in History.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

HS 501. Special Topics.4 Credits.

Offered: As needed

HS 524. Approaches to World History.4 Credits.

This course examines various approaches to, and interpretations of, world history. The course has a topical format, with the specific focus shifting depending on contemporary global issues, recent interpretive innovations in the field and the interests of the instructor and the students. A specific goal of the class is to offer future teachers approaches to modern world history that will aid them in lesson planning and development. More generally, the goals of this class include the improvement of written and oral communication skills and the development of critical thinking skills through the examination of primary and secondary sources and the construction of interpretative arguments.

Offered: Every year, All

HS 525. History of the Atlantic World From the 15th to 19th Century.4 Credits.

This course explores the world made by contact, exchanges and clashes between European, Africans and Americans between the early 1400s to the late 1800s. The key assertion underpinning this course is that, despite social and cultural distinctiveness, Europe, Africa and America were interconnected, and are best understood as a "regional system" where each part is most intelligible by investigating its relationship to the whole. Using a thematic and chronological approach, this course explores critical themes that not only link these sub-regions but also give them distinctive historical character. Global trade networks, migration and settlement, colonization and imperialism, cultural and epidemiological transmission, race and gender relations and demographic reconfigurations are among the topics investigated in this course.

Offered: Every other year, All

HS 526. Approaches to U.S. History.4 Credits.

This course examines various approaches to, and interpretations of, U.S. history. The course focuses on a specific topic in American history and varies according to contemporary global issues, recent historiographical shifts, methodological innovations and/or the interests of the instructor and the students. One goal of this class is to offer future and present primary, middle and secondary schoolteachers approaches to U.S. history that may aid them in content and lesson planning. This course also uses typical historical methods, including the examination of primary and secondary sources and the construction of interpretative arguments, to develop written and oral communication skills as well as critical thinking.

Offered: Every year, Spring

HS 527. Approaches to Modern European History.4 Credits.

This course examines modern European history from a variety of standpoints. The course has a topical format--the specific focus shifts depending on contemporary issues and events, recent interpretive innovations in European history and the interests of the instructor and the students. In addition to deepening their knowledge of recent European history, the course also aids future teachers in developing rigorous and historically rich lessons for their students.

Offered: Every year, Fall

HS 563. Dynamics of American Social Structure.3 Credits.

This course considers continuity and change in values/beliefs and group structure as documented in the life of one American community. The relation between life chances and the lifestyle of minority groups at different periods and the responses of the dominant group are analyzed; the social, economic and political factors that shape the opportunity structure and the struggle for equality also are considered.

Offered: As needed, All

HS 564. Topics in East Asian History.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to Chinese and Japanese civilizations from the dawn of history to the end of the 20th century. The course stresses the artistic, cultural and intellectual traditions that evolved in East Asia.

Offered: As needed

HS 565. Topics in Geography for the 21st Century (GP 565).3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the general structure and methodology of geographic study in a cultural setting. The interaction among environments, populations, ways of life and locations are studied in a coherent, organized way. The distribution of people, food, energy and resources are analyzed, and there is an assessment of how to evaluate environmental potential, to deal with other peoples, to maximize available opportunities, and to determine which course of action to follow for progress and growth.

Offered: As needed

HS 566. Chinese Civilization.3 Credits.

In this introduction to Chinese civilization from the dawn of Chinese history until the end of the dynastic cycle in 1911, students are first introduced to the geography of China. Next, they learn about the evolution of the Chinese written language. Following this, the class considers the three ways of thought-Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism-which provided the ideological "glue" that held traditional Chinese society together. Last, students explore the worlds of Chinese literature, art and architecture.

Offered: As needed, All

HS 567. Popular Culture in American History.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed, All

HS 599. Independent Study.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed, All