The Department of Justice and Law offers students a humanities-based approach to law and the legal system within the context of a liberal arts education and a social science perspective on law breaking behavior, crime as a social phenomenon and methods of social control.

The BA in Law in Society provides an avenue for majors to understand the multifaceted dimensions of legal discourse, including the historical context in which the legal system was fashioned, the ethical implications of the construction and implementation of legal rules, and the policy impact that contemporary legal decisions continue to have on various aspects of governance in both the public and private spheres. Our students are exposed to essential aspects of legal practice, procedure and methodology, and are taught to bridge their practical understanding of the legal profession by placing those skills in a broader context and recognizing laws as being reflective of broader elements of social change.

The focus of the major is on how law reflects the values of society and constantly adapts to changes in societal behavior and opinion. We look at how laws affect the relationships between individuals and groups in society, and of groups to each other. We discuss issues such as justice, equity and the balance between the rights of individuals and the public interest from a legal, historical and societal viewpoint. The Law in Society major develops specific legal research, writing and critical thinking skills, all within a framework of the ethical and statutory constraints confronting the legal professions. After graduation, many of our students continue their education by attending law or graduate school. Others work in law-related settings, such as working as a paralegal in a law office or business. Other graduates have become social workers, teachers and business owners.

The BA in Criminal Justice educates students on topics from the evaluation of institutions of formal social control, such as policing, courts and corrections, to advocating for crime victims. The program places particular emphasis on experiential learning through its carefully structured internships and its community-based coursework.

The department also offers minors in Criminal Justice and Law in Society, and there is an additional minor/certificate in Legal Studies, approved by the American Bar Association, that provides students with the opportunity to study legal practice and prepares them to work as paralegals. 

The department is home to the Micro-Credit Institute (MCI). It is an alternative structure for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion education designed to deliver skills, education and community experiences in innovative one-credit formats. MCI began with the belief that students should have the opportunity to fill their 16th credit with a course that aids in the advancement and support of DEI education. 

Quinnipiac University’s Bachelor of Arts in ­­­­Law in Society approaches the study of law, legal processes and legal institutions in the tradition of the humanities. The classic values of a liberal arts education are combined with the critical thinking, analytical writing and oral presentation skills of the legal profession and prepare graduates to become active and thoughtful citizens in their local and global communities. The Law in Society major culminates with the integration of the classroom component with professional skills development in which students complete both a scholarly thesis and an internship in a professional, law-related setting. 

The Criminal Justice program prepares students for work in the diverse and challenging criminal justice field. Recent developments, including growth of the prison population and increasing numbers of prisoners returning to communities, create challenges our criminal justice majors are prepared to meet. Our program combines theory with practice as our majors learn in the classroom and the professional world. While students take courses dealing with topics such as policing, crime by juveniles, corrections and forensic science, a required 120-hour internship lets them apply their classroom experiences in a professional setting. Our internship program is unique as we meet with each student to assess their professional interests before recommending appropriate internship sites. In addition to 120 hours at the internship site, students participate in a weekly seminar to connect skills they take from the internship to their coursework. Students have the option to complete two different internships that teach them about criminal justice work across diverse settings. Our graduates are employed in a range of fields including policing (local, state and federal), law, social work and probation, and some pursue advanced degrees in criminal justice or related fields. Criminal justice majors benefit from small class sizes and advising loads so they have ready access to faculty to help them shape their educational experience to best fit their professional and personal aspirations.

Criminal Justice (CJ)

CJ 101. Crime and Society.3 Credits.

This course examines crime as a cultural phenomenon and as a problem of social control. Topics include the nature of law, characteristics of the criminal justice system, types of crime, as well as the critical evaluation of theories of crime.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Social Sciences, Intercultural Understand

CJ 200. Special Topics.3 Credits.

A variety of special topics courses are periodically offered.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: As needed

CJ 205. From College to Career (SO/GT 205).1 Credit.

This course introduces sociology, gerontology and criminal justice majors to the preprofessional skills and knowledge they need to practice prior to obtaining their internship. Students are introduced to practical skills that will benefit them throughout their professional careers ranging from self-reflection to resume writing and email etiquette. Students meet regularly to discuss the breadth of potential careers in sociology, criminal justice and gerontology through interaction with departmental faculty and practitioners in the field. For criminal justice majors only. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. For CJ majors only

Prerequisites: Take CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

CJ 225. Addiction and Crime.3 Credits.

This course will examine the impact of addiction on both the justice system and those processed through it. Specific topics include understanding the addiction process and exploring the impact of addiction on justice system resources. The course will examine how addiction contributes to justice system involvement and explore best practices to address it within the criminal justice system.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 232. Women in the Criminal Justice System (SO/WGS 232).3 Credits.

This course examines the changing patterns of women's criminality, the experiences of women who are processed as crime victims, and the evolution of women's role in law, law enforcement and corrections.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring
UC: Social Sciences, Intercultural Understand

CJ 241. Police and Policing.3 Credits.

This course considers the history and development of functions in policing. Issues and controversies in policing such as: training, police ideology, police management styles, the development of a working police "personality," the appropriate use of force, racial profiling, police corruption, patrol, professionalism, due process and vocational considerations are examined.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Social Sciences

CJ 243. Investigative Techniques.3 Credits.

This course provides students with knowledge of basic concepts of case and crime scene investigation; scene and investigative personnel management; nature of investigative personnel roles; steps in the processing of scenes and evidence; methods of documentation; general and specialized techniques for the recognition, identification and individualization of evidence; sources of investigative information; interview techniques; reconstruction of events; and legal and ethical considerations during criminal investigations. For majors only.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring

CJ 250. Youth Crime (SO 250).3 Credits.

This course deals with youth crime as distinct from adult crime. Students examine the development of the juvenile delinquency concept and justification for classifying juveniles who offend as separate from adults. Factors contributing to the onset of juvenile delinquency and relevant research also are examined. The course considers development and current functions of the juvenile justice system, paying particular attention to the challenges justice officials face daily. A range of widely used treatment strategies for dealing with juveniles who offend is examined.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall
UC: Social Sciences, Intercultural Understand

CJ 251. Probation Parole and Community Corrections.3 Credits.

People who offend are sentenced to one of these alternatives to incarceration in order to change or control behavior. Methods of supervision, special goals such as shock probation or parole, electronic and other "high-tech" monitoring, controversies over effectiveness and punitive aspects of these technologies are considered.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring

CJ 253. Sexual Violence (WGS 253).3 Credits.

This course takes a historical perspective on the societal and psychological aspects of sexual violence as it applies to the criminal justice system. It includes an examination of the etiology of sexual abuse as a law enforcement issue and explores the societal impact of sexual violence upon both those who commit violence and those who are the victims of it. The course encourages students to deepen their understanding of the social, structural and individual treatment modalities that are employed within the system to decrease sexual violence.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring

CJ 261. Prisons and Jails.3 Credits.

This course covers incarceration in both prisons and jails. Students examine incarceration as a social phenomenon, exploring its connections to political, economic and cultural forces in society. Participants investigate the history of imprisonment, theories of punishment and the (intended and unintended) societal ramifications of incarceration. Topics include prison architecture, social classifications, prison culture and inmate social structure, violence in prison, "Supermax" prisons, rehabilitation and prisoner reentry.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Social Sciences, Intercultural Understand

CJ 263. Prosecution and Sentencing.3 Credits.

This course will examine the role of the court system with particular emphasis on the role and obligations of prosecutors. The course examines the role of prosecutors and considers how prosecutors impact sentencing decisions made in court. Particular attention will be given to the plea-bargaining process, the courtroom work group, and the impact of legal and extra-legal factors in sentencing.

Prerequisites: TAKE SO 101 SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 OR CJ 101;
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

CJ 271. Public Order Crimes (SO 271).3 Credits.

Approximately two-thirds of the individuals incarcerated inside U.S. correctional institutions have been found guilty of public order crimes, "moral crimes" or crimes not likely to have a self-identified victim. This course concentrates on crimes associated with such activities as illegitimate gambling, consensual sex and the criminal use and sale of both legal and illegal substances.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring

CJ 275. Sexual Violence Victim Advocacy (WGS 275).3 Credits.

This class prepares students to be peer educators on sexual assault, and the hours spent in class may be counted towards state certification for rape crisis victim advocacy. The class is centered on the victim's perspective on sexual assault and sexual abuse, as well as educating others about helping rape survivors. The course will cover basic information about sexual violence and rape myths, the protocol for reporting rape in different venues (e.g., on campus, police, hospital, rape crisis center), policies on sexual assault, and methods for assisting survivors. The class is recommended for those students interested in becoming rape crisis victim advocates and/or providing peer education about sexual assault on campus. As such, the course does require attendance in class, as well as out-of-class assignments, including an on-call component that could require students to respond to hospital calls to support victims who are receiving the rape kit examination. Students who complete the certification program will be eligible to volunteer on campus under the supervision of the Rape Crisis Center in Meriden. Certified victim advocates are expected to be available for on campus volunteer work during the two semesters following the class.Instructor permission required.

Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 290. Criminal Justice Research Methods.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to social science research methods used in the criminal justice field. Students examine how qualitative and quantitative research methods apply to social science research. The course places particular emphasis on the importance of scientific methods in reaching informed conclusions. Students examine a number of methods commonly used in social science disciplines and learn how to interpret the results of research conducted using these methods. Understanding how social scientists investigate social phenomena allows students to accurately interpret and apply findings from criminal justice research. Students should complete the course by the end of their sophomore year or second year in the major. Majors only.

Prerequisites: Take CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

CJ 300. Special Topics.3 Credits.

A variety of advanced special topics courses are periodically offered.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: As needed

CJ 320. Victimology.3 Credits.

Historically, the primary concern of the justice system was the apprehension and punishment of people who offend. More recently, however, the needs of crime victims are increasingly recognized both formally and informally in the justice process. This course examines the emergence of victimology as a field of study and the origins and impacts of victim stigma. Students learn about the range of harms crime victims experience and the importance of addressing victim needs throughout the justice process.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 325. Advanced Victimology.3 Credits.

Theories of victimology are increasingly being studied in an effort to provide comprehensive services to victims of crime. Beyond recognizing the needs of victims, we must study the most effective ways of providing services. This course will focus on Trauma Informed delivery of services to victims of crime, with an emphasis on developing both theoretical and pragmatic knowledge that can be used to assist victims with tangible and intangible needs. Class discussions and collaborative work will center on the analysis of empirical patterns of various victimizations and methods employed to enhance victim assistance.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101 SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CJ 330. Perspectives on Violence (SO 330).3 Credits.

This course explores the many ways that violence is viewed in our society. Topics include types of violence, empirical evidence of incidence, characteristics of violent crimes, motivation to offend, victim profiles and sociological and theoretical explanations.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 333. Drugs, Alcohol and Society (SO 333).3 Credits.

This analytical discussion-based course explores the use of drugs and alcohol in U.S. society. The emphasis is on drug and alcohol use and abuse as a social phenomenon. Students explore issues such as the relationship of drug use to particular groups in society (age, sex, race/ethnicity); patterns of drug use and abuse; the promotion of drugs by the media; and drug and alcohol abuse in historical perspective. Students also learn about drug categories, drug education, prevention and treatment and about drug laws.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Summer
UC: Breadth Elective, University Curriculum Ele, Intercultural Understand

CJ 343. Forensic Issues in Law Enforcement.3 Credits.

This course presents an overview of the scientific method and its application to the analysis of physical evidence as it impacts law enforcement investigations. Topics include the study of basic methods of documentation, collection and preservation of physical evidence; general schemes for the analysis of chemical and biological evidence; identification and individualization of firearms, fingerprints, imprints, hairs, fibers, blood and body fluids, paint, drugs and poisons, and other materials associated with crimes. The course material is reinforced through the use of actual case studies, hands-on exercises and class exercises.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 351. Corrections Counseling.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive investigation of mental health and correctional systems, including residential and community-based treatment programs and correctional supervision methods. Students will develop critical thinking skills relating to best practices in a variety of correctional settings. Various offender populations with be addressed including those with mental health disorders, substance abuse disorders, sex offenders, women offenders, and highly resistant and severely anti-social offenders.

Corequisites: TAKE SO 101 SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CJ 355. Crime and Media (SO 355).3 Credits.

Despite little direct contact with people who offend or with the criminal justice system, people typically hold strong opinions about crime-related issues. The goal of this course is to understand how media sources shape our attitudes and beliefs about crime and how we "should" respond to it. To this end, participants examine media involvement in constructing the reality of crime and justice and its implications for the justice process.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring
UC: Breadth Elective, University Curriculum Ele

CJ 360. Inside-Out Prison Exchange Seminar.3 Credits.

The "Inside-Out" Prison Exchange seminar is part of a national movement giving undergraduate students (outside students) and currently incarcerated individuals (inside students) an opportunity to learn together. This course, being offered to Quinnipiac students and male students at a Connecticut state prison, asks students to examine the impact of status upon American life by considering issues of personal and collective voice in communities, variation in access to conventional success opportunities, and the effect of status upon ability to effectively engage in local and national communities. Through application of theoretical perspectives and consideration of practical experience, students are exposed to a diversity of material that allows them to more fully examine and understand the complex impact of social status upon American life. Note: this course takes place inside a Connecticut state prison.

Prerequisites: Instructor discretion.
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 370. Constitution, Ethics and Policing.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the constitutional limitations and ethical considerations that affect police behavior. These include use of force, coercion, entrapment, right to counsel, wiretapping, confessions and exclusionary rule.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 375. Family Violence.3 Credits.

This course covers the study of family violence, including patterns, trends, and explanations of offender behavior as well as the effects of being the victim of criminal behaviors committed within the context of the family. The course concepts cover theories and methodologies used to study family violence, as well as discussion of policies in place to intervene in these types of crime, including child maltreatment in the family, intimate partner abuse, and elder abuse.

Prerequisites: TAKE SO 101 SO 101H OR CJ 101;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CJ 385. Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice Policy.3 Credits.

This senior-level course examines social policy as applied to a selected aspect of the criminal justice field. Senior status in criminal justice major required.

Prerequisites: Take CJ 290.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

CJ 392. Internship in the Community (SO 392/GT 392).3 Credits.

For criminal justice majors in their junior or senior year only. Students each complete 120 hours of supervised fieldwork in a community agency along with one hour per week in a classroom setting. Coursework and class content include written and oral reflection, focusing on professional issues, along with criminal justice concepts and theory. Successful completion of the course requires adherence to a high standard of professionalism. Students are required to meet with the internship coordinator one semester prior to begin the placement process.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101; and CJ 205.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

CJ 394. Advanced Internship in the Community (SO 394/GT 394).3 Credits.

This is a second internship available to criminal justice majors in their junior or senior year only. Students complete 135 hours of supervised fieldwork in a community agency along with one hour per week in the advanced internship class. Students build upon the knowledge gained from their first internship experience to deepen their understanding of concepts and theory through extended written and oral reflection. Students also assess their interpersonal strengths and weaknesses in preparation for graduate school and/or future employment. Successful completion of the course requires adherence to a high standard of professionalism. Students are required to meet with the internship coordinator one semester prior to begin the placement process.

Prerequisites: Take CJ 392.
Offered: As needed

CJ 399. Independent Study in Criminal Justice.1-6 Credits.

By arrangement with individual instructor. This course addresses the special intellectual interests of a student and focuses on an issue of special or timely importance.

Prerequisites: Take SO 101, SO 101H SO 225 SO 244 or CJ 101.
Offered: As needed

Justice Studies (JS)

JS 101. Introduction to Justice Studies.3 Credits.

Introduction to Justice Studies engages with the topic of justice in contemporary society (what it is, who gets to define it, who gets to administer it, and who gets more access to it). The course takes a holistic approach that engages the problem of injustice as a human problem through the exploration of contemporary events. As an introductory course, it is designed to raise critical questions, explore pressing problems, and to give a broad overview of careers dealing with contemporary justice issues, justice systems, and the administration of justice.

Offered: As needed, Fall and Spring

Legal Studies (LE)

LE 101. Introduction to the American Legal System.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the American system of law and legal structure and gain an overview of several areas of law. Topics include basic legal concepts, the structure of the American court system, as well as legal theory and procedure.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Humanities

LE 101H. Honors Introduction to the American Legal System.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the American system of law and legal structure, and gain an overview of several areas of law. Topics include basic legal concepts, the structure of the American court system, as well as legal theory and procedure.

Offered: As needed

LE 115. Criminal Law.3 Credits.

This overview of the American system of criminal justice includes study of its various institutions, such as the criminal courts, police, prosecutors and defense attorneys, and jails and prisons. The Fourth Amendment (Search and Seizure) and the Fifth Amendment (Privilege Against Self-Incrimination) are studied. Also explored are schools of thought underlying criminal prosecution and correctional philosophy.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

LE 150. Introduction to Mock Trial.1 Credit.

This experiential learning course introduces students to the legal skills associated with bringing a case to trial. Students develop skills in trial advocacy through a progressive development of techniques related to the trial of a case using an established fact pattern throughout the semester. Skills in trial procedure, legal analysis, evidentiary argument and oral advocacy are developed throughout the course, which culminates in the presentation of a trial based upon the established fact pattern.

Offered: Every year, Spring

LE 159. Legal Studies Elective.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

LE 160. Competitive Mock Trial.1 Credit.

This course is designed for students who intend to compete in mock trial competitions throughout the fall semester. Students develop and enhance skills related to trial procedure, legal analysis and oral advocacy through preparation for competition at mock trial tournaments during the fall semester through the preparation of direct and cross examinations, opening and closing arguments and the portrayal of witness roles. They attend one or more mock trial tournaments during the fall semester in preparation for the American Mock Trial Association Regional Tournament in February. Students are permitted to repeat this course, for 3 credits total.

Offered: Every year, Fall

LE 200. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take LE 101.
Offered: As needed

LE 211. Legal Reasoning, Research and Writing I.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to legal research, both in print and online sources, and provides a foundation in legal reasoning, writing and citation in the context of objective, predictive legal documents. Students learn how to move from a fact pattern, through researching and analyzing the controlling law, to presenting the student's legal analysis in the form of formal legal memoranda.

Prerequisites: Take LE 101, EN 102 or Take LE 101, EN 103H
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

LE 212. Legal Reasoning, Research and Writing II.3 Credits.

Building on the skills learned in LE 211, students in this course refine and further develop their analytical, research and writing skills and learn to present their findings in a wider variety of legal documents. Students also are introduced to persuasive legal writing and advocacy.

Prerequisites: Take LE 211.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

LE 224. Sports Law (SPS 224).3 Credits.

Students explore the legal concepts surrounding sports, including contracts, torts, crimes and Title IX. Legal issues involve all sports and level of athletics, include professional, amateur, student and fans.

Prerequisites: Take LE 101.
Offered: Every year, Spring

LE 225. Alternative Dispute Resolution.3 Credits.

Students explore the various methods of dispute resolution that are available in the private sector, as alternatives to traditional litigation. Students learn to distinguish the various forms of dispute resolution, determine who participates in each form, how they participate and the advantages and disadvantages of each. Students role play in the various methods to more fully understand the mechanisms of alternative dispute resolution.

Prerequisites: Take LE 101.
Offered: Every Third Year, Fall

LE 233. Law for Everyday Life.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the practical legal implications of everyday adult living and helps students understand the legal aspects of different issues which they may be involved with as they live their adult lives. Topics such as renting or buying a home, employment, insurance, marriage, credit and many others are covered.

Prerequisites: Take LE 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring
UC: Humanities

LE 250. Gender and the Law (WGS 250).3 Credits.

This course focuses on legal issues regarding gender, including the differential treatment of women, men and transgender people in the legal system, and contemporary responses to gender issues in society. (Alternative Perspective)

Prerequisites: Take LE 101 or WGS 101.
Offered: Every Third Year, Fall

LE 300. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: As needed

LE 305. Civil Procedures.3 Credits.

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the procedure of civil litigation from the beginning of a conflict to its final resolution, from both a theoretical and practical approach. The course covers the beginning of the litigation process, from when a client first contacts an attorney, through motions and pleadings, by following a torts case. Jurisdiction, torts, client interviewing, fact investigation, pleadings, motion practice, discovery and settlement are covered. The role of the attorneys, paralegals and other non-lawyer professionals, is discussed.

Prerequisites: Take LE 212 and junior status.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

LE 312. Family Law.3 Credits.

This course presents a study of how law relates to the family as a functioning entity, examination of family law practice, current issues in family law and equal protection, and preparation of documents for dissolution of marriage. (Practice)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

LE 315. Wills, Probate and Estate Administration.3 Credits.

Legal concepts and statutes pertaining to wills and probate are examined, with special emphasis on preparation of forms necessary in administration of an estate. (Practice)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

LE 317. International Law (PO 317).3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the nature and development of international law as part of the global political system. They explore sources of international law from treaties, custom, general principles, judicial decision and scholarly writing. Other topics include the connection between international and national law, dispute resolution using arbitration and national and international court cases, use of law to manage international conflict, negotiation, and legal issues concerning shared resources. (Alternative Perspective)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

LE 318. Human Rights Law and Global Justice.3 Credits.

What is a human right? How do particular political and historical contexts influence our understanding of rights and the construction of legal rules? This course focuses on the legal statutes and cases that constitute human rights jurisprudence, and also on the human interest stories that inform and shape those rights from a cross-cultural context. Students work with a local organization to gain a better understanding of what an abstract notion of "human rights" means to individuals. (Alternative Perspective)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every other year, Fall and Spring

LE 319. International Law and the Individual.3 Credits.

This course considers the complex legal issues surrounding private interactions between individuals from different nations. Students explore the sources of law that may apply when a citizen of one country lives and works in another country or simply has dealings on a business or personal level with persons from other countries. Topics include immigration, customs, taxation, banking, family law, traveling, health care, voting and criminal justice. (Alternative Perspective)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every Third Year, Fall

LE 320. Land Transfer and Closing Procedures.3 Credits.

This course presents background for the sources of real estate law; land and its elements, the nature of property, the concept of ownership, and land titles and interest in land; procedures for conveying interest in land recording statutes; and searching titles. Emphasis is given to the preparation, coordination and completion of real estate closings. (Practice)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

LE 322. Health Care Law (HSC 322).3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the legal issues faced by health care providers and patients. Students explore various topics arising from the organization and financing of health care, provider liability, bioethics and public health. The course focuses on the way in which law impacts the delivery of health care in the United States.

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies; or Take LE 101 and HSC 220 or GT 263.
Offered: Every year, Summer

LE 328. Employment Law.3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the legal relationship between employer and employee and a basic understanding of employment-related law and its impact on the employer/employee relationship. Students study both federal and state laws applicable to the employer/employee relationship. Areas covered include the basis for the employer/employee relationship, pre-employment concerns, diversity and discrimination issues, discrimination actions, termination of the employer/employee relationship, ethical issues in employment law and current issues. (Practice)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

LE 329. European Union Law.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the European Union and its relationship with the United States. It covers the origin and development of the European Union, the institutions of the EU and the law-making process in the EU. Certain specific legal regimes in the EU, including "the four freedoms," EU business and anti-trust law, and the EU's common security and foreign policy are discussed. The course includes a travel abroad option, spending spring break in Brussels, the primary seat of the EU regional "government." Day trips to the medieval city of Bruges, Belgium and to Aachen, Germany round out the experience. (Alternative Perspective)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every Third Year, Spring

LE 330. Law of Business Entities.3 Credits.

In this study of the different types of business entities, including corporations, partnerships and limited liability companies/partnerships, emphasis is given to researching and drafting documents involved in the formation, maintenance and dissolution of business entities. (Practice)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

LE 336. Immigration Law.3 Credits.

The course introduces students to the basic legal principles relating to immigration to the United States. Students learn how to analyze immigration options for potential non-immigrants and immigrants. Students gain an understanding of the different avenues of immigrating to the U.S. on a temporary or permanent basis, as well as how to become a U.S. citizen and immigration law compliance. Refugee issues and status are also discussed. (Alternative Perspective)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every Third Year, Spring

LE 340. American Constitutional Law (PO353).3 Credits.

The United States Constitution and how it has been interpreted by the Supreme Court are studied in this course. The class examines Supreme Court decisions with a focus on analysis and legal reasoning.

Prerequisites: Take PO 131 or 6 credits from subject LE.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

LE 342. Comparative Constitutional Law (PO 342).3 Credits.

Students compare the legal structures and fundamental principles typically found in constitutions by studying the constitutions of several different countries. The course explores the structure of government; the distinction between legislative, executive and judicial authority; the incorporation of fundamental human rights; the relationship between church and state; free speech and the press, and social welfare rights. Participants analyze the distinction between constitutional law and domestic law and assess the role of various constitutional frameworks in a global society. (Alternative Perspective)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses or take PO 131 or PO 101.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

LE 345. Intellectual Property.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the different areas of intellectual property law, including patents, trademarks, trade secrets and copyright law. Intellectual property protects products created by writers, artists and inventors. Preparation of necessary documents is covered. (Practice)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

LE 350. Federal Indian Law.3 Credits.

The relationship between the federal government and Native Americans and tribes is considered from a historical and practical perspective, along with current topics in Indian law. Practice applications before the two Connecticut tribal courts are covered as well. (Alternative Perspective) (Practice)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every Third Year, Spring

LE 355. Environmental Law (ENV 355).3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of federal environmental law, the way law protects the natural environment and government policies created to protect or exploit the environment. In this class, we explore issues impacting the environment, and how the law can both benefit and disadvantage the environment. (Practice)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

LE 356. International Environmental Law (ENV 356).3 Credits.

This course gives students an overview of the legal and political framework that constitutes international environmental law. We examine the characteristics of international law and distinguish it from domestic law, looking at the various actors and their roles in the system. Students become familiar with the key principles of international environmental law such as the precautionary principle, sovereignty and sustainable development. Issues examined include climate change, the oceans, and the relationship between trade and the environment. (Alternative Perspective)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every other year, Fall

LE 360. Mediation.3 Credits.

This course approaches mediation from the mediator's perspective. Students develop a sophisticated understanding of the legal and ethical aspects of mediation and learn to mediate disputes between parties in the context of civil, criminal and family disputes. Students also learn how to use mediation techniques to resolve disputes in non-legal settings. The course employs mediation exercises, role plays, simulations, self-critique and group discussions to demonstrate and evaluate effective communication skills, bargaining strategies, mediation styles and intervention techniques. (Practice)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

LE 370. Negotiation.3 Credits.

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of the theory, strategy and practice of negotiation, both transactional and as a dispute resolution method. Students learn to negotiate to resolve problems and communicate effectively, within an ethical framework. The course uses negotiation strategy, exercises, role plays, group discussions and reflective writing to demonstrate and evaluate negotiation techniques and styles. (Practice)

Prerequisites: Take 6 credits from legal studies courses.
Offered: Every year, Fall

LE 485. Legal Internship Seminar.3 Credits.

Students are placed in a supervised legal internship in a law office, government office, nonprofit organization or other legal setting for 10 hours per week. During the weekly seminar, students discuss legal ethics, professional responsibility and career development. They also complete a legal memo on a complex topic incorporating principles from the core legal studies courses, as well as participate in a mock appellate oral argument. Students also produce a journal focused on their guiding question in completion of the Capstone requirement. For majors and students completing the Minor/Certificate in Legal Studies only.

Prerequisites: Take LE 305 and senior status required.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

LE 490. Senior Seminar in Law in Society.3 Credits.

In this seminar, students must research a legal issue of their choosing; critically examine how our legal system addresses, or fails to address, the issue; and recommend a change in our approach, suggest an alternative interpretation, or highlight a particularly effective response to the issue. Students ultimately produce legal scholarship with a focused thesis developed through substantial research and analysis. The course culminates in each student completing a publishable quality thesis and presenting that work to the class orally. For majors only.

Prerequisites: Take LE 305 and senior status required.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

LE 499. Independent Study in Legal Studies.1-4 Credits.

Micro Credit Institute (MCI)

MCI 100. Negotiation for Success.1 Credit.

This is a one credit course that has been developed based on the premise that everyone is involved in some form of negotiation every day. Negotiation is indeed an essential skill that is called upon frequently in our private as well as professional life. From the shop floor to the boardroom, negotiation is something that one cannot avoid. Knowing how to negotiate, and more importantly, how to manage it well, is the key to increasing sales effectiveness, developing sound working relationships with co-workers, building better customer relations, achieving career goals, and obtaining a higher salary. The course is open to everyone but is designed especially for first-generation college student.

Offered: As needed

MCI 101. Health, Aging and Intersectionality.1 Credit.

This course explores the intersections between illness, aging and identity. Students will have the opportunity to find new ways to approach, reflect on and talk about topics ranging from aging and disability to issues limiting the health and wellness of underrepresented and marginalized groups through language, poetry and other mediums.

Offered: As needed

MCI 102. Octavia Butler: Black Feminist Sci Fi Pioneer.1 Credit.

This one-credit course focuses on the best author you've (probably) never heard of. Winner of the MacArthur "Genius Grant" and Hugo and Nebula awards for science fiction, Octavia Butler's short stories and novels focus on blood and biology, power and subjugation. She writes about slavery and time travel, love and space travel, an epidemic cured only by art, and a women captured by aliens who births a new hybrid species. We will discuss the intersection of race and gender in fictional worlds and real ones. We will also consider the purpose of reading literature, as well as what "counts" as literary. This course has no prerequisites and welcomes anyone and everyone who wants to join us.

Offered: As needed

MCI 103. Higher Education in Prison: Past, Present and Future.1 Credit.

This course focuses on the longstanding, but only recently attended to, field of higher education in prison. Since the late 19th century, higher education institutions and religious institutions have provided myriad educational opportunities for incarcerated people; recently, with justice and education advocates figuring prominently in getting the 1994 Pell ban repealed and movies like "College Behind Bars" being such a success, the spotlight has increased on higher education in prison programs. This course will explore the history of these programs, the current landscape of the field, as well as hear from experts currently building the field into a comprehensive discipline with impacted persons co-leading the charge. This course is open to anyone interested in learning more about higher education in prison.

Offered: As needed

MCI 104. Women and Body Image in the Age of Social Media.1 Credit.

Throughout this one-credit course, we will learn about the history of mass media and how it has both reflected and reshaped women's body image, with a focus on the rise of social media and how it continues to play a role in women's conceptions of their own body image. We will be reading a number of scholarly articles and books that look specifically at issues of embodiment and the intersection of gender, sexuality, race/ethnicity, and social class. We will also be investigating and developing a more positive and sustainable relationship between our own social media usage and our bodies. Please note that this course is not appropriate for anyone who has any form of eating disorder/disordered eating/body dysmorphia. Due to its content, this course may trigger previous or current conditions. Please use discretion when considering if this course is appropriate for you.

Offered: As needed

MCI 105. Intro to Judaism.1 Credit.

The intention of this one-credit program is to explore and explain basic Judaism with its binding principles. This program is geared towards students of every faith.

Offered: As needed

MCI 106. Questioning Mother Culture.1 Credit.

Drawing from Daniel Quinn's Ishmael, this course will challenge us to first notice how Western industrialization's Mother Culture impacts our daily lives. Next, the course will offer opportunities for rethinking new narratives for creating a more just, equitable, sustainable cultural landscape.

Offered: As needed

MCI 108. Why No HBCUs in Connecticut.1 Credit.

Despite the obvious geographic concentration of Historically Black Colleges & Universities (HBCUs) in the southeastern part of the United States, Connecticut was - or was supposed to be - a pioneer in this educational revolution. One of the first HBCUs, the Negro College, was actually planned and proposed in New Haven, in the shadow of Yale University and several years before the founding of any HBCU still in existence; so what happened? Flashback through time to find out in this one-credit course.

Offered: As needed

MCI 110. Race: A Dangerous Symbol.1 Credit.

This one-credit course is intended to explore how the racial symbolic system plays itself out in the everyday world, and the ease and advantages that White-Americans have in navigating the everyday world. The course will directly address the difficulties, disadvantages, micro-aggressions and violence that people of color face in their everyday worlds, as a result of the American symbolic system surrounding race. The course is designed to provide a cultural theory of symbolic self in a pervasive racialized system.

Offered: As needed

MCI 120. Intergenerational Dialogues.1 Credit.

This one-credit course is designed to bring students into the community to interact, study and learn about social justice issues in an intergenerational environment. Topics, location and number of meetings will vary depending on the professor offering it.

Offered: As needed

MCI 150. Queering the Screen: LGBTQ Representation in Movies.1 Credit.

This one-credit, seven-week course will explore lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) characters in movies over the last 100 years and how these films reflect our understanding of sexuality and gender expression. Representations of LGBTQ characters on film date back to early silent movies; however, political and religious agendas have often suppressed these representations and perpetuated negative societal views and intolerance. Even so, these films have also contributed to the positive development of LGBTQ identity and the LGBTQ rights movement. This on-ground, discussion-based course is open to anyone interested in LGBTQ history and/or film.

Offered: As needed

MCI 190. Special Topics.1 Credit.

Offered: As needed

Quinnipiac's Minor/Certificate in Legal Studies is approved by the American Bar Association.