Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)

Program Contact: Tracy Wall 203-582-8212 or Michelle Broggi 203-582-8057

The Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program at Quinnipiac prepares students to be outstanding clinicians equipped for contemporary practice through a three-year, 12-month graduate program. Students develop the essential skills of a 21st-century health care professional by having access to expert academic and clinical faculty and the benefit of learning in state-of-the-art facilities. The program is an integrated curriculum of foundational knowledge and clinical training and is located in the Center for Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences. Students learn the foundation of movement science through full body dissection in the Human Anatomy Lab and application in the Motion Analysis Lab. The learning environment for clinical skills, clinical decision-making and professionalism is supported in classrooms, well-equipped laboratories, and progressive technology. Students can practice and are assessed on skills utilizing simulation, standardized patients and clinical-readiness practicums. The program integrates frequent client-based opportunities throughout the curriculum in addition to three full-time clinical experiences completed at various domestic or international clinical sites. Although the goal of the program is to prepare entry-level physical therapists, faculty value establishing close mentoring relationships through in-depth research or innovative projects that allow students to grow intellectually and professionally. 

DPT students at Quinnipiac take advantage of a myriad of student opportunities, which include leadership or participant roles in the campus student-run pro-bono rehabilitation clinic, graduation with Distinction in Interprofessional Education through the extensive opportunities within the university’s Center for Interprofessional Healthcare Education, international delegations involved in Global Solidarity through a Fair-Trade Learning Model, sustainable local community service, attendance and presentation at professional conferences, a vibrant graduate council, as well as a variety university sponsored specialized camps. 

Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT degree) for Direct-Entry HSS-DPT, AT-DPT and Internal Transfer Students

A total of 112 credits is required for completion of the DPT.

Plan of Study Grid
First Year
Fall SemesterCredits
PT 503L Physical Therapy Process I Lab 2
PT 505
505L
Kinesiology I
and Kinesiology I Lab
3
PT 512
512L
Human Anatomy I
and Human Anatomy Lab
4
PT 518 Functional Neuroanatomy 3
PT 519 Professional Issues in Physical Therapy I 2
PT 569 Education/Community Health/Wellness 2
 Credits16
Spring Semester
PT 504L Physical Therapy Process II Lab 4
PT 507
507L
Kinesiology II
and Kinesiology II Lab
3
PT 509 Clinical Decision Making I 2
PT 513
513L
Human Anatomy II
and Human Anatomy II Lab
3
PT 528
528L
Musculoskeletal I
and Musculoskeletal I Lab
4
PT 548L Physical Agents Lab 1
 Credits17
Summer Semester
PT 516 Clinical Decision Making II 1
PT 517 Clinical Education Seminar 1
PT 520 Pathophysiology I 3
PT 523 Applied Pharmacology I 1
PT 529
529L
Musculoskeletal II
and Musculoskeletal II Lab
4
PT 531
531L
Acute Care and Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy I
and Acute Care Cardiopulmonary Lab I
4
PT 675 Normal/Abnormal Gait 1
 Credits15
Second Year
Fall Semester
PT 657 Imaging for Physical Therapists 2
PT 671 Clinical Education I 4
PT 685 Evidence in Practice 2
 Credits8
Spring Semester
PT 626 Pathophysiology II 3
PT 627 Applied Pharmacology II 1
PT 628
628L
Acute Care and Cardiopulmonary II
and Acute Care and Cardiopulmonary II Lab
3
PT 653
653L
Neurorehabilitation I
and Neurorehabilitation I Lab
4
PT 658 Differential Diagnosis 3
PT 666 Capstone I 2
 Credits16
Summer Semester
PT 652 Professional Issues in Physical Therapy II 1
PT 654
654L
Neurorehabilitation II
and Neurorehabilitation II Lab
4
PT 661 Administration and Leadership in Physical Therapy 3
PT 668 Psychosocial Aspects of Physical Disability 2
PT 676 Capstone II 1
PT 679 Clinical Decision Making III 2
 Credits13
Third Year
Fall Semester
PT 730
730L
Musculoskeletal III
and Musculoskeletal III Lab
3
PT 736
736L
Pediatric Rehabilitation
and Pediatric Rehabilitation Lab
4
PT 740
740L
Prosthetics and Orthotics
and Prosthetics and Orthotics Lab
2
PT 744 Physical Therapy Skills Elective 2
PT 769 Advanced Clinical Decision Making 2
PT 767 Capstone III 2
 Credits15
Spring Semester
PT 781 Clinical Internship II 6
 Credits6
Summer Semester
PT 782 Clinical Internship III 6
 Credits6
 Total Credits112

*The curriculum for the professional courses in the program are subject to modification as deemed necessary to maintain a high-quality educational experience and keep current with best practices in the profession.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the Physical Therapy program, students will demonstrate the following competencies:

Students will become lifelong learners through reflective practice.

1. Self-directed learner: develop, implement and evaluate one’s own approach to learning through various educational experiences.

2. Social responsibility: employ an ethical framework guiding the professional duty to act for the benefit of society at large.

Students will provide proficient patient-centered care.

1. Professionalism: be accountable for one's physical therapy judgments, actions and omissions as related to standards of the profession.

2. Clinical competence: skillfully manage patients in an efficient, safe and effective manner with an ability to seek help accordingly.

3. Clinical decision making: using a framework of thinking to analyze and interpret health care information from multiple sources to justify clinical judgments.

4. Interprofessional health care: use a framework of understanding of the roles and shared values of various health professionals to facilitate interprofessional communication and teamwork.

Students will demonstrate innovative thinking.

1. Creative thinking: devise imaginative or original solutions in the context of patient care to address health within the scope of practice.

2. Evidence informed decision making: critically appraise and integrate evidence to generate sound clinical judgments.

Philosophy

Excellence in physical therapy education is developed in cooperation with the larger university and health science community that is student-centered and focused on academic distinction. Our program seeks to enhance the professional development of every student and faculty member through a variety of academic, scholarly and service opportunities. This philosophy is well represented by the program’s physical resources and integrated curriculum that links foundational and medical sciences, clinical practice and professionalism.

Mission Statement 

The department of physical therapy at Quinnipiac University provides an innovative, student-oriented environment to prepare students who can meet the evolving health needs of society.  The program is dedicated to developing lifelong learners who will enhance the profession through a commitment to reflective practice, interprofessional collaboration, leadership and socially responsible action. The educational experience embodies the core values of both the university and APTA. Students provide patient-centered care using evidence-informed practice to optimize movement and positively transform society.

To achieve its mission, the Doctor of Physical Therapy program:

  • Cultivates critical and reflective thinking, clinical decision-making, and lifelong learning by utilizing an evidenced-based learning model, authentic assessments and a variety of learning experiences that include interactive technology. This learning model features small lab sizes, hands-on activities, visits to area clinics and opportunities to engage in professional development forums and community interdisciplinary collaboration.
  • Provides both in-class and in-clinic opportunities for students to engage in the essential elements of patient/client management.
  • Supports faculty teacher-scholars who are effective teachers and who collectively engage in scholarship, professional development, direct patient care and university and community service.

The Physical Therapy department is a member of the Early Assurance consortium for physical therapy education. Please see Entry-Level DPT for information concerning admission to the program and course of undergraduate study.

Professional DPT Program Requirements

Students in the professional graduate DPT component of the curriculum are required to achieve a GPA of 3.0 in each semester. In addition, a grade of C+ or better is required in all professional graduate component courses. Students whose averages for each semester fall below 3.0 or receive a grade below C+ may be subject to dismissal from the program. Transfer students are considered for admission to the professional graduate DPT program on a space-available basis.

For continuation in the program, all students must successfully complete all course work in the sequence identified. In addition to these academic requirements, all DPT students must be aware that there are additional requirements necessary to participate in scheduled clinical affiliations. Specific health requirements, including but not limited to: titers for mumps, measles and rubella, varicella and hepatitis B, annual physical exams, two-step PPDs, flu shots, current CPR certification and other mandates must be completed within the timeframe established by the clinical site at which a student has been placed. In addition, criminal background check updates and drug testing also may be required. These mandates are facility-specific and change frequently without notice. Quinnipiac University has no authority over any clinical facilities’ protocols. Students must comply with what is required at their specific clinical affiliation.

Clinical education is a vital component of physical therapy student education and is a significant part of the physical therapy curriculum at Quinnipiac University. Clinical education experiences occur through both integrated and full-time clinical experiences in a variety of settings throughout the country. Placement in specific settings, locations and clinical facilities is not ever guaranteed and individual student assignment occurs at the discretion of the faculty. Students may be required to travel for clinical assignments. All associated housing and travel costs are the responsibility of the student.

Technical Standards and Essential Requirements

Introduction

Professional education requires that the accumulation of knowledge be accompanied by the simultaneous acquisition of skills, professional attributes and behaviors. Professional school faculty members have a societal responsibility to matriculate and graduate the best possible health care professionals. Therefore, admission to the School of Health Sciences Department of Physical Therapy (DPT) is offered to those who present the highest qualifications for the study and practice of physical therapy. The technical standards presented below are prerequisite for admission to, progression in, and graduation from the school and department. Successful completion of all courses in the DPT curriculum is required to develop the essential knowledge, skills and professional attributes of a competent physical therapist.

Graduates of the School of Health Sciences Department of Physical Therapy must have the knowledge and skill to function in a broad variety of clinical environments and to render a wide spectrum of patient care. The Department of Physical Therapy acknowledges Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and PL 101-336 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), but asserts that certain minimum technical standards must be present in prospective candidates for admission, progression and graduation.

Commitment to Seeking Reasonable Accommodations

Physical Therapy education requires not only the accumulation of scientific knowledge but the acquisition of skills, professional attributes and behaviors. Technical standards and Essential Requirements presented in this document are prerequisite, nonacademic requirements for admission, progression and graduation from the Quinnipiac University DPT program. Definitions of technical standards are required for the accreditation of this program by Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE). All required courses in the curriculum are designed to develop the essential functions necessary to become a competent physical therapist.

The Quinnipiac University DPT program is committed to the principles of equitable and accessible education and to providing reasonable accommodations to students with disabilities. The Department of Physical Therapy strives to provide reasonable accommodations for qualified individuals with disabilities who apply for admission and are enrolled as physical therapy students. Should, despite reasonable accommodation (whether the candidate chooses to use the accommodation or not), a candidate’s existing or acquired disability(ies) interfere with patient or peer safety, or otherwise impede his/her ability to complete the Quinnipiac University DPT educational program and advance to graduation, the candidate may be denied admission or progression, or may be separated, or dismissed from the program.

Technical Standards and Essential Requirements

Cognitive/ Reasoning Skills: Students must possess a range of cognitive and reasoning skills that allows them to master the broad and complex body of knowledge that comprises a physical therapy curriculum. Students must have the ability to follow course syllabi, assignments/ exams, practicals and any other action plans developed by the faculty/ program. They must exhibit the ability to develop problem-solving skills, and to make clinical decisions rapidly, under pressure, to set priorities and improvise in a timely manner consistent with professional practice. This includes the ability to analyze, integrate and synthesize objective and subjective data to make timely decisions that reflect consistent and thoughtful deliberation within best practice standards. Students must be able to demonstrate the ability to perform these cognitive skills efficiently, with flexibility, and while using appropriate clinical reasoning that is inherent to the needs in the clinical environment.

Examples of specific Cognitive/Reasoning skills include but are not limited to:

  • Measure, calculate, reason, analyze and synthesize data related to patient examination, diagnosis and treatment of patients.
  • Demonstrate sound judgement in patient assessment, diagnostic and therapeutic planning.
  • Exercise proper awareness and complete responsibilities in a timely and accurate manner.
  • Synthesize information, problem-solve and think critically to decide the most appropriate theory or assessment strategy.
  • Identify and communicate when help is needed and make proper decisions regarding when a task should or should not be carried out alone.
  • Interpret graphs and spatial relationships.

Communication Skills: Students must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients and families as well as with faculty, preceptors, peers and members of the health care team within learning experiences. Effective communication includes verbal and non-verbal interactions, such as the interpretation of facial expressions, affect and body language. The student also must be able to receive, interpret and send written communications in a timely manner consistent with contemporary practice. Fluency in the English language is required at matriculation into the program, although applications from students with hearing and/or speech disabilities will receive full consideration. In such cases, the use of a trained intermediary or other communication aide may be appropriate. These intermediary functions only as an information conduit and does not serve in any interpretive capacity.

Examples of specific required Communication Skills include but are not limited to:

  • Competence in writing, understanding, interpreting and speaking the English language.
  • Efficient, effective, accurate and timely communication using a range of communication media as appropriate to the purpose and audience.
  • Use of communication and sensory skills to convey information.
  • Use of communication and sensory skills to accurately elicit information including a patient history and other information necessary to effectively evaluate a client or patient’s condition.
  • Accurate perception of non-verbal information and cues in interpersonal encounters.

Motor Skills: Students must possess sufficient fine and gross motor skills necessary such that they are able to obtain adequate information from a physical therapy exam and  provide effective interventions to patients of all ages, sizes, and gender. The student must demonstrate the physical ability to sufficiently move a patient and self around varying work environments, on various surfaces, and to and from different levels. Students must possess adequate motor ability to respond efficiently and effectively in emergency situations.

Examples of specific Motor Skills include but are not limited to:

  • Use of a keyboard or equivalent device to record patient information.
  • Assist a patient with safe floor <-> stand transfers.
  • Enter small areas (e.g., bathroom, car) and assist patients with safe transfers.
  • Provide manual resistance sufficient for a maximal manual muscle test of a large muscle group.
  • Manage and manipulate limbs of all sizes to accurately assess joint mobility.
  • Adapt manual inputs/contacts based on patient effort.
  • Use of surgical instruments for activities such as anatomy dissections and wound debridement.
  • Assist in performing a multi-person safe transfer of obese patients.
  • Access transportation to and from clinical and didactic sites.
  • Assume and maintain a variety of body postures (e.g., sitting, standing, walking, bending, squatting, kneeling, stair climbing, reaching forward or overhead, turning, moving the trunk and neck in all directions) to adequately perform patient examination and interventions.
  • Balance self and provide support/ balance to patients and equipment on a variety of surfaces including level and uneven ground, ramps, curbs and stairs.
  • Maintain sufficient endurance to effectively manage patient care, for a minimum of 35 hours per week.

Observation: Observation requires the functional use of vision, hearing and somatic senses. Observation allows students to gather data to efficiently and effectively respond to patients and families as well as with faculty, preceptors and all members of the health care team and other learning experiences. Students must be able to observe lectures, laboratory demonstrations, in-class demonstrations and patients in the classroom and clinic.

Students must maintain sufficient Observation skills to perform various parts of a physical therapy examination and interventions, including but not limited to:

  • Palpation of peripheral pulses, bony landmarks and ligamentous structures.
  • Visual and tactile evaluation of areas for inflammation or edema.
  • Use of a stethoscope, sphygmomanometer and goniometer.
  • Detect muscle activity sufficient to distinguish trace contractions.
  • Hear medical alarms or patient vocalizations in case of an emergent situation.
  • Monitor physiologic changes in patient status to adjust or discontinue treatment.
  • Visually examine patient movement patterns and non-verbal expressions in order to adjust treatment.
  • Assess environmental safety.
  • Examine skin integrity and wounds.

Professional Ethics and Values: Students must be able to relate to patients, families and colleagues with honesty, integrity and dedication in a non-discriminatory manner. Students must demonstrate a manner consistent with sensitivity and respect for all social or cultural backgrounds. Students must conduct themselves appropriately in all academic and clinical interactions in classroom, clinic and community. They must have the ability to function and exhibit the American Physical Therapy Association Code of Ethics and Guide for Professional Conduct. Students must abide by all applicable Quinnipiac University policies. Background check policy requires students to comply with all applicable state and federal regulations as required by the State of Connecticut, the state in which they reside, and the state in which clinical work or fieldwork placements are located. Criminal histories may also prevent a student from taking The Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy Exam (FSBPTE).

Students must demonstrate Professional Ethics and Values including but not limited to:

  • Establishing a rapport with patients, families, faculty and colleagues.
  • Nurture mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients, families, faculty and colleagues.
  • Conflict resolution skills, including the ability to negotiate differing attitudes and opinions.
  • Maintain a cooperative and professional manner.
  • Manage stress effectively through self-care and by relying upon supportive relationships with colleagues, peers, mentors and others.
  • Employ sound judgement.
  • Arrive and being on time for professional commitments including class and clinical experiences.
  • Abide by the appropriate dress code given the setting (academic and clinical).
  • Manage and prioritize tasks to meet responsibilities.
  • Seek assistance and guidance in a timely manner.
  • Accept and respond appropriately to constructive feedback.
  • Manage personal affairs in a manner that does not interfere with professional responsibilities.
  • Adhere to the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) Code of Ethics.
  • Perform own work, give credit for other’s ideas, and properly reference sources.
  • Protect the confidentiality of patient information consistent with current applicable law and clinical site guidelines.
  • Participate and perform in a manner consistent with real clinical practice guidelines during lab, practical, standardized or simulated experiences in order to learn and demonstrate curricular related knowledge.

Contact the Office of Student Accessibility for further information regarding reasonable accommodations in the didactic, laboratory, practical or clinical settings:

(myq.quinnipiac.edu/Academics/LearningCommons/Pages/StudentAccessibility.aspx)

Email: access@qu.edu

Phone number: 203-582-7600

The physical therapy program at Quinnipiac University is accredited by the
Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE)
1111 North Fairfax Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
telephone: 703-706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.org; website: capteonline.org

PT 503L. Physical Therapy Process I Lab.2 Credits.

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of foundational physical therapy skills, such as body mechanics, sensation, basic handling skills, measurement of vital signs, goniometry and muscle testing of the upper extremity, and therapeutic exercise. Students learn appropriate use of medical terminology and are introduced to taking a patient history and documentation.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 504L. Physical Therapy Process II Lab.4 Credits.

This course utilizes the Physical Therapist Patient/Client Management Model to build upon and integrate assessment skills developed in Physical Therapy Process I. Assessment techniques including neurologic examination, goniometry and manual muscle testing of the spine and the lower extremities are covered. Physical Therapy interventions including functional mobility training and therapeutic exercise prescription focusing on the lower extremities and complex multi-joint activities are introduced, and principles and methods of stretching are discussed.

Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 505. Kinesiology I.2 Credits.

This course introduces the basic principles of human movement. Forces and torques in static clinical free body diagrams are studied. Numerous problem-solving processes and skills are developed throughout the semester. The student learns to identify different muscle interactions and combinations. Students also study movement and movement patterns of the upper extremity, using an EMG recording system.

Prerequisites: Take MA 141.
Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 505L. Kinesiology I Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany PT 505.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 507. Kinesiology II.2 Credits.

Kinesiology II introduces the foundational principles of biomechanics with special emphasis on applications to the lower extremities. The course emphasizes joint structure and function of the lower extremity as well as the spine. Forces and torques in static clinical free body diagrams are expanded and dynamic motion is studied. Students are taught hands-on clinical palpation techniques to enhance understanding of muscle function and joint mechanics.

Corequisites: Take PT 507L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 507L. Kinesiology II Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany PT 507.

Corequisites: Take PT 507.
Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 509. Clinical Decision Making I.2 Credits.

This course is designed to integrate information from previous academic and clinical experiences. The APTA model of physical therapist practice, evidence informed practice, and the ICF model provide foundational frameworks to guide clinical decision making. An interactive, case-based approach is used to develop problem solving, and reinforce the principles of documentation.

Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 512. Human Anatomy I.3 Credits.

This course presents the anatomical structures of the upper extremity, back, head and neck through lecture and human donor dissection experiences. Students analyze the relationship between structures, function and application to human movement. Clinical correlations between anatomy and pathology provide a foundation for clinical decision making. This course emphasizes collaboration in an active learning environment.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 211, BIO 212.
Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 512L. Human Anatomy Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany PT 512.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 513. Human Anatomy II.2 Credits.

This course presents the anatomical structures of the pelvis, lower extremity and body cavities through lecture and human donor dissection experiences. Students analyze the relationship between structures, function and application to human movement. Clinical correlations between anatomy and pathology provide a foundation for clinical decision making. This course emphasizes collaboration in an active learning environment.

Prerequisites: Take PT 512.
Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 513L. Human Anatomy II Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany PT 513.

Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 516. Clinical Decision Making II.1 Credit.

This case-based course provides students with an opportunity to integrate information from previous academic and clinical experiences. Using the ICF model, students reflect on in-class cases, standardized patient experiences and integrated clinical experiences to reinforce integration of multiple systems in a patient/client management model. These experiences and a cumulative practical assist students as they prepare for their first full-time clinical experience.

Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 517. Clinical Education Seminar.1 Credit.

This course provides the essential information for physical therapist students to enter full-time clinical experiences. The course informs students about expectations for clinical performance, compliance mandates for the clinical setting, communication strategies, and expectations for service at the clinical site. Students are introduced to concepts about cultural sensitivity and humility and strategies for success during clinical experiences.

Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 518. Functional Neuroanatomy.3 Credits.

This course presents the gross and developmental anatomy of the central nervous system, including major structures, landmarks and pathways. Normal motor control and postural control mechanisms are also explored. Emphasis is placed on the function of these structures with cases planned to illustrate the functional outcomes of pathology in these structures.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 519. Professional Issues in Physical Therapy I.2 Credits.

This course presents the foundations of the physical therapy profession. Students explore the roles of the American Physical Therapy Association, including practice issues, professional skills and behaviors, the profession's Code of Ethics and Core Values. The roles of the physical therapist in the health care system and the community is discussed. The roles and responsibilities of the professions in the health care team are explored.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 520. Pathophysiology I.3 Credits.

This course integrates material taught in the foundational courses with disease-specific content regarding the cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, hematological, hepatic and endocrine systems. Active learning strategies help students interpret relationships between pathophysiology and clinical presentation to make safe and effective clinical decisions within physical therapy examination and intervention strategies.

Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 523. Applied Pharmacology I.1 Credit.

This course enables students to identify and discuss the impact of drug therapy on patients receiving physical therapy. Students integrate this information into patient/client management. Specifically, students look at medications utilized for cardiovascular, pulmonary disease processes and pain management.

Offered: Every year, Summer Online

PT 528. Musculoskeletal I.3 Credits.

This course begins to integrate information from foundational courses. The student learns to use an evidence-informed approach to examine, evaluate and establish a plan of care for patients with various musculoskeletal conditions. Emphasis is placed on patients with conditions affecting the shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand, hip and knee regions of the body.

Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 528L. Musculoskeletal I Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany PT 528.

Corequisites: Take PT 528.
Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 529. Musculoskeletal II.3 Credits.

This course continues to integrate information from foundational courses. The student learns to use an evidence-informed approach to examine, evaluate and establish a plan of care for patients with various musculoskeletal conditions. Emphasis is placed on patients with conditions affecting the spine and foot/ankle regions of the body.

Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 529L. Musculoskeletal II Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany PT 529.

Corequisites: Take PT 529.
Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 531. Acute Care and Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy I.3 Credits.

This course provides the student with the foundational knowledge required for the management of patients with acute medical conditions with an emphasis on pulmonary, cardiac and dermatological pathologies. Integrating information from previous and concurrent coursework, students learn to examine and evaluate patients in the acute care setting, document findings and design a plan of care.

Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 531L. Acute Care Cardiopulmonary Lab I.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany PT 531.

Corequisites: Take PT 531.
Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 548L. Physical Agents Lab.1 Credit.

This course provides students with the foundational knowledge and skills to utilize therapeutic physical modalities of superficial and deep heat, cold, electrotherapy, and light to complement other therapeutic interventions to optimize patient outcomes. A case-based model is utilized to facilitate problem-solving, and integration of theory and evidence.

Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 569. Education/Community Health/Wellness.2 Credits.

This course provides the students with the foundational knowledge of wellness, disease prevention and health promotion within a community setting. The social determinants of health and health literacy are explored, especially as they relate to the unique role of physical therapists in community practice. Students develop an appreciation for cultural diversity and its possible influence on health behaviors and health practice.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 599. Independent Study.1-3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

PT 626. Pathophysiology II.3 Credits.

This course builds on information taught in the foundational sciences and is designed to provide the physical therapy student with detailed information regarding the pathologies of the central nervous system and musculoskeletal systems. The course provides the basis for interpreting abnormalities and the impact to physical therapy. The students build a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the diseases and their effects on physical therapist examination and intervention strategies.

Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 627. Applied Pharmacology II.0-1 Credits.

This course is a continuation of Pharmacology I to introduce the physical therapist student to the chemical agents that many patients are taking. This course allows the student to understand how drug therapy can affect patients receiving physical therapy and how physical therapy intervention strategies may need to be modified. Specific medications utilized in the treatment of cancer, neurologic conditions, endocrine dysfunction, antimicrobials and role of CAMs are covered.

Offered: Every year, Spring Online

PT 628. Acute Care and Cardiopulmonary II.2 Credits.

This course integrates and builds upon knowledge acquired in the foundational curriculum to examine, evaluate and treat patients with cardiovascular and pulmonary dysfunction across the lifespan. Students prioritize examinations, select evidence-based interventions, manage lines and equipment and demonstrate competency. Medical history and hemodynamic status are interpreted to make clinical decisions for complex patients. Students explore the impact obesity, systemic disease, endurance, medications, social support, age-appropriate care and interprofessional collaboration on patient outcomes

Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 628L. Acute Care and Cardiopulmonary II Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany PT 628.

Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 652. Professional Issues in Physical Therapy II.1 Credit.

This course introduces students to the current issues facing the physical therapy profession. Topics include professional trends and professionalism, risk management, workforce trends including minority and cultural impacts to care, education trends, legal and ethical issues. The course addresses physical therapy concerns related to state and federal legislation, governance and advocacy for patients and the profession.

Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 653. Neurorehabilitation I.3 Credits.

This course presents a framework for integrating the assessment and treatment techniques appropriate for adults with various neurological conditions. Students learn assessment procedures based on evaluation of normal movement, abnormal movement and function. The course includes laboratory instruction where students develop comprehensive examination techniques, plan and prioritize appropriate goals and interventions, and hypothesize outcomes through case-based modeling and integrated clinical experiences.

Corequisites: Take PT 653L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 653L. Neurorehabilitation I Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany PT 653.

Corequisites: Take PT 653.
Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 654. Neurorehabilitation II.3 Credits.

This course is designed as a continuation of Neurorehabiliation I. Lecture and lab topics include continued framework development of evaluation and innovative treatment approaches for adults with various neurological conditions. Students are required to integrate and synthesize knowledge gained from current and previous coursework. During the lecture and lab, students continue to develop complex comprehensive evaluation techniques, plan appropriate treatments, and hypothesize outcomes through case-based modeling and integrated clinical experiences.

Corequisites: Take PT 654L.
Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 654L. Neurorehabilitation II Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany PT 654.

Corequisites: Take PT 654.
Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 657. Imaging for Physical Therapists.2 Credits.

This course introduces the student to imaging principles and techniques as applied to musculoskeletal, neurologic and cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. The integration of imaging in terms of examination, evaluation and patient management is explored within the scope of practice. The course emphasizes radiographic anatomy, common normal variants and some pathological and traumatic conditions. In addition to standard radiographic techniques, other imaging and special techniques are discussed.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 658. Differential Diagnosis.3 Credits.

This course integrates clinical experience with systems-based knowledge (musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, and neurologic) to develop a more complex framework for clinical decision making. Students develop methods of identifying signs and symptoms of diseases and differentiating patient presentations to render examination and referral judgments. Throughout the course, the student engages in clinical and didactic self-reflection to monitor and evaluate judgements based on patient interview and objective examination.

Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 661. Administration and Leadership in Physical Therapy.3 Credits.

This course provides students with the theory, skills, and applications for physical therapy administration in various practice settings across the United States health care delivery system. Students explore leadership roles and responsibilities and the consultative model of physical therapy. A case-based model is utilized to facilitate problem-solving and synthesize knowledge to address contemporary health care issues.

Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 666. Capstone I.2 Credits.

This is the first of a three-course series culminating in an original project that contributes to the body of knowledge in physical therapy. The goals are to: 1) identify the purpose of the project to include a literature review (Capstone I); 2) develop a detailed description of the project (Capstone I); 3) to implement the project (Capstone II & III), and 4) report on the project and disseminate the outcome (Capstone III).

Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 668. Psychosocial Aspects of Physical Disability.2 Credits.

This course presents students with the knowledge of psychosocial dimensions that influence recovery from a physical disability. Stages of adaptation, loss and grief, motivation, confidence, and motivational interviewing techniques are explored to provide person-centered interventions for positive patient outcomes. A case-based model is used to facilitate problem solving and synthesis knowledge of psychological disorders and mental health issues in order to modify a plan of care.

Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 669. Clinical Integration.1 Credit.

This case-based course provides students with an opportunity to synthesize and integrate information from courses completed thus far in the DPT curriculum. Students reflect on in-class cases, as well as previous clinical experiences, to examine patient-centered care within the context of different health conditions and varied personal, environmental and participation factors.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all previously sequenced coursework.
Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 671. Clinical Education I.4 Credits.

Students participate in a full-time, 10-week clinical educational experience, which provides them with an understanding of the continuum of care. Students contribute to all aspects of patient management for clients with various heath conditions. They continue to develop their professional and interpersonal skills through interactions with clients, families and health professionals.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 675. Normal/Abnormal Gait.1 Credit.

This online course provides an overview of normal gait with an emphasis on kinematic and kinetic analysis of the gait cycle. Gait analysis techniques including motion analysis, dynamic electromyography, force plate recordings, and measurement of stride characteristics are presented. Physical therapy treatment approaches for patients with abnormal gait are introduced.

Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 676. Capstone II.1 Credit.

This is the second of a three-course series culminating in an original project that contributes to the body of knowledge in physical therapy. The goals are to: 1) identify the purpose of the project to include a literature review (Capstone I); 2) develop a detailed description of the project (Capstone I); 3) to implement the project (Capstone II & III); and 4) report on the project and disseminate the outcome (Capstone III).

Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 679. Clinical Decision Making III.2 Credits.

This case-based course provides students an opportunity to synthesize and integrate information from courses completed thus far in the DPT curriculum. Students reflect on in-class cases, as well as previous clinical experiences, to examine patient-centered care within the context of different health conditions and varied personal, environmental and participation factors.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all previously sequenced coursework.
Offered: Every year, Summer

PT 685. Evidence in Practice.2 Credits.

This course provides students with the skills and knowledge needed to read, interpret and appraise the quality of various types of primary (intervention, prognosis and diagnosis studies) and secondary (systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines) research. Topics include psychometric properties of outcome measures, research design, hypothesis testing and ethics in research. Learning experiences include completion of online tutorials and assignments, and participation in student-led small group discussions of current evidence.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 730. Musculoskeletal III.2 Credits.

This course is designed as a continuation of musculoskeletal I and II.  Lecture and lab topics include continued framework development of evaluation and contemporary treatment approaches including thrust manipulation for clients with various musculoskeletal conditions.  Students are required to integrate and synthesize knowledge gained from current and previous coursework.  During the lecture and lab, students continue to develop comprehensive examination techniques, implement appropriate interventions, and hypothesize outcomes through case-based modeling.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 730L. Musculoskeletal III Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany PT 730.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 736. Pediatric Rehabilitation.3 Credits.

This course presents information needed for the physical therapy student to complete a thorough examination and evaluation of a child with neurological and/or orthopedic diagnoses. Upon completion of the examination, students are able to generate an accurate diagnosis, prognosis and an appropriate plan of care for these patients. Relevant theory and practical learning experiences are provided for the student to develop the knowledge and skills necessary for applying an evidence-based physical therapy intervention strategy for the physical therapy plan of care.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 736L. Pediatric Rehabilitation Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany PT 736.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 740. Prosthetics and Orthotics.1 Credit.

This course is the study of the examination and treatment of individuals with prosthetic and orthotic devices. The focus is on the lower extremity and gait. The course provides the students with the necessary skills to thoroughly examine and treat patients with lower extremity prosthetic or orthotic devices.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 740L. Prosthetics and Orthotics Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany PT 740 Prosthetics and Orthotics.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 744. Physical Therapy Skills Elective.2 Credits.

This course is a required therapy skills course in which students can choose a section focusing on a specific area of concentration from one of the four main practice areas of physical therapy: neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary or integumentary. All sections of the course use the essential elements of PT practice as an organizing framework and incorporate the review and practical application of recent literature.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 759. PBL Advanced Clinical Decision-Making.3 Credits.

This course features problem-based learning activities and education theories to assist students in continuing to refine and employ their cognitive framework for Physical Therapy practice. The class includes integration and synthesis of client information from all areas of PT practice. Students analyze their clinical decision making within the context of case-based problem solving, evidence informed practice, and formulation of client-centered plans of care along the continuum of care.

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 767. Capstone III.2 Credits.

This is the third of a three-course series culminating in an original project that contributes to the body of knowledge in physical therapy. The goals are to: 1) identify the purpose of the project to include a literature review (Capstone I); 2) develop a detailed description of the project (Capstone I); 3) to implement the project (Capstone II & III); and 4) report on the project and disseminate the outcome (Capstone III).

Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 769. Advanced Clinical Decision Making.2 Credits.

This course features problem-based learning activities and education theories to assist students in continuing to refine and employ their cognitive framework for Physical Therapy practice. The class includes integration and synthesis of client information from all areas of PT practice. Students analyze their clinical decision making within the context of case-based problem solving, evidence informed practice, and formulation of client-centered plans of care along the continuum of care.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all previously sequenced coursework.
Offered: Every year, Fall

PT 781. Clinical Internship II.6 Credits.

This full-time, 12 week clinical education experience requires students to demonstrate skills in all aspects of patient management for clients in a wider array of clinical settings.  Students are expected to integrate all didactic information and previous clinically based experiences to inform their practice. They are expected to demonstrate professional and interpersonal skills through interactions with clients, families and health professionals.

Offered: Every year, Spring

PT 782. Clinical Internship III.5 Credits.

This final, full-time, 12-week clinical education experience requires students to demonstrate skills in all aspects of patient management for clients in clinical settings. Students integrate all didactic information and previous clinically based experiences to inform their practice. They demonstrate professional and interpersonal skills through interactions with clients, families and health professionals. Students are prepared for entry-level practice at the conclusion of the course.

Offered: Every year, Summer