School of Business

Master of Business Administration

Master of Science

Dual-Degree Programs

Certificates in Health Care Administration

For specific information about the mission and learning goals for each of the graduate programs, please visit the university website at qu.edu.

Accounting

AC 613. Financial Statement Analysis.3 Credits.

In this course, students gain an additional understanding of the accounting numbers that appear in financial statements for accounts such as receivables, deferred revenue and leases. Topics include revenue recognition, income-statement geography, short-term liquidity, working-capital efficiencies, solvency, cash-flow analysis and quarterly reporting. Also considered are the many reporting choices given to firms and how their use of different accounting methods for similar economic events creates challenges for analysts. Instances of questionable financial reporting and strategies that can aid in their discovery are addressed. Firms' filings of financial statements and note disclosures with the SEC on Form 10-K are examined throughout the course. In addition, the usefulness of governance disclosures contained within firms' proxy statements is considered. Students cannot receive credit for both AC 613 and AC 640.

Offered: Every year, Fall

AC 620. Financial and Managerial Accounting for Decision Making (MBA 620).3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the use of accounting information for decision making in organizations. Topics include reporting and analysis of financial statement information and the use of managerial decision-making tools to support planning and control. Students can receive credit for either AC 620 or MBA 620 but not both.

Offered: Every year, All

AC 635. Advanced Financial Accounting.3 Credits.

This course provides an in-depth study of accounting principles and analysis of problems for multi-corporate entities, focusing on business combinations, consolidation concepts and procedures, and intercompany transfers. Includes the accounting for multinational entities, and segmental, interim and SEC reporting. Students learn standard-related research skills and complete several research cases using the FASB codification database.

Prerequisites: Take one undergraduate intermediate accounting course.
Offered: Every year, Fall

AC 640. Financial Statement Analysis.3 Credits.

In this course, students gain additional understanding of how firms communicate through financial statements. They learn how to use financial statement analysis in strategic decision making. Students will learn to interpret financial statements, analyze cash flows, and make judgments about the quality of earnings, assets and liabilities. Students cannot receive credit for both AC 613 and AC 640.

Prerequisites: Take one undergraduate intermediate accounting course.
Offered: Every year, Fall

AC 645. Information Assurance.3 Credits.

This course is designed to broaden and deepen students' conceptual and technical understanding of the CPA's attest function, provide students with a framework for analyzing contemporary auditing and assurance issues, and help students understand the complete audit of a client. This course utilizes case studies to study current issues and practices associated with information assurance services.

Prerequisites: Take one undergraduate accounting auditing course.
Offered: Every year, Fall

AC 650. Advanced Accounting Information Systems.3 Credits.

This course provides students with in-depth knowledge of the role accounting information systems play in a business environment. Using a combination of course delivery methods, this course emphasizes information, communication and networking technology--in the context of business processes, transaction cycles and internal control structures--that enhances the production of accurate and reliable accounting information.

Prerequisites: Take one undergraduate accounting information systems course.
Offered: Every year, Fall

AC 660. Strategic Management Control Systems.3 Credits.

This course provides students with broad exposure to the ways in which management control systems and management accounting information are used to support various organizations' strategies. The course involves both textbook/problem-based and case-based learning methods to cover issues related to strategy selection, performance evaluation, organizational profitability, customer profitability, organizational structure, and employee compensation. Special emphasis is placed on ethical considerations, not-for-profit organizations and sustainability issues.

Offered: Every year, Spring

AC 665. Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination.3 Credits.

This course provides a survey of forensic accounting and fraud examination. Students gain an understanding of different types of fraud, sources of evidence and analysis of fraud schemes highlighting the skills needed to identify and investigate fraudulent accounting allegations. This course employs case studies to study current issues, practices and techniques related to fraud examination and forensic accounting services.

Offered: Every year, Spring

AC 670. Advanced Business Law, Regulation, Ethics and Reporting Environments.3 Credits.

In this course, students learn to identify and resolve complex legal and ethical issues typically encountered by businesses. Emphasis is placed on business law topics relevant to the accounting profession. Topics may include agency law and worker classification, formation and performance of contracts, debtors, creditors, guarantors, secured transactions, bankruptcy, federal securities regulation, formation, operation, termination of business entities, and liability of accountants.

Prerequisites: Take one undergraduate business law course.
Offered: Every year, Spring

AC 675. Governmental and Not-For-Profit Accounting.3 Credits.

This course provides an in-depth study of the financial reporting concepts and standards applicable to state and local governments, and not-for-profit entities such as colleges and universities, health care entities, and voluntary health and welfare organizations. It emphasizes the differences between governmental and private sector (for-profit) accounting. Particular attention is placed on the preparation and analysis of governmental financial reports.

Prerequisites: Take one undergraduate intermediate accounting course.
Offered: Every year, Spring

AC 680. Advanced Federal Income Taxation and Tax Research.3 Credits.

In this course, students gain the knowledge and understanding of concepts and laws relating to federal income taxation of individuals and entities. In addition, students learn how to apply the knowledge and skills gained from this course in professional tax preparation and tax advisory positions. Some of the topics covered include federal tax process, procedures, accounting and planning, as well as federal taxation of individuals, entities (C corporations, S corporations, partnerships, trusts and estates and exempt organizations) and taxation of property transactions.

Offered: Every year, Spring

AC 688. Seminar in Accounting.3 Credits.

Permission of the MBA director and School of Business dean is required.

Offered: As needed

AC 689. Independent Study - Accounting.3 Credits.

Independent research under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires approval by the faculty member, chair of the department, and dean of the School of Business.

Offered: As needed

Business Analytics (BAN)

BAN 300. Statistical Programming.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to R, a widely used statistical programming language. Students will learn to read data, write functions, analyze data and create visualizations in R.

Prerequisites: Take AC 211 and EC 271 or EC 272;
Offered: Every year, Fall

BAN 310. Web Analytics.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the concept and use of web analytics. Topics covered include measurement planning, data collection, audience characteristics, traffic acquisition, and user behavior. Students use Google Analytics to apply their learning and take the Google Analytics Individual Qualification exam to demonstrate their proficiency at the completion of this course.

Prerequisites: Take CIS 101;
Offered: Every year, Spring

BAN 400. Data Mining.3 Credits.

Data mining methodologies and the process of formulating and solving problems using data mining techniques are utilized to recognize patterns in data and compute predictions. Predictive models such as decision trees, neural networks, regressions and other techniques will be studied.

Prerequisites: Take EC 271 or EC 272; and CIS 350;
Offered: Every year, Fall

BAN 410. Social Media Analytics.3 Credits.

This course will cover social media strategies and applications, implications for business, privacy issues associated with social media, and factors contributing to social change. Business cases evaluating the use and value of social media will be examined and social network analysis and visualization will be utilized.

Prerequisites: Take BAN 300;
Offered: Every year, Spring

BAN 610. Introduction to Business Analytics.3 Credits.

This course develops ideas for helping to make decisions based upon the examination of data. Topics include variability, data display and summary statistics, regression, and correlation, probability, probability distributions, sampling, the central limit theorem, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Attention is also given to the design of experiments and analysis of variance, frequency distributions, statistical inference and sampling theory.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BAN 615. Predictive Modeling.3 Credits.

The course introduces the techniques of predictive modeling and analytics in a data-rich business environment. It covers the process of formulating business objectives, data selection, preparation and partition to successfully design, build, evaluate and implement predictive models for a variety of practical business applications (such as marketing, customer retention, delinquency and collection analytics, fraud detection and insurance). Predictive models such as classification and decision trees, neural networks, regressions, pattern discovery analysis and other techniques are studied.

Prerequisites: Take BAN 610.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BAN 620. Text Mining.3 Credits.

This course builds upon previously introduced data mining methods, focusing specifically on techniques for text extraction and mining. Topics include efficient text indexing; document clustering and classification; information retrieval models; enhancement of structured data; scenario detection techniques; and using textual data in predictive models.

Prerequisites: Take CIS 628.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

BAN 650. Data Visualization.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction as well as hands-on experience to the field of data visualization. Students learn basic visualization design and evaluation principles to create meaningful displays of quantitative and qualitative data. They learn techniques for visualizing multivariate, temporal, text-based, geospatial, hierarchical and network/graph-based data.

Offered: Every year, Spring and Summer

BAN 660. Optimization.3 Credits.

This course focuses on developing computational methods to solve various optimization problems. Advanced regression analysis, time series analysis and other techniques are used to support improved forecasting and decision making.

Prerequisites: Take BAN 610 BAN 615.
Offered: Every other year

BAN 661. Web Analytics and Web Intelligence.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the analysis of a variety of web metrics including tracking, traffic and visitor behavior, tactics and strategies to successfully market on the Web to make data-driven decisions. Business analytics tools and techniques are utilized to extract and analyze web-scale data to guide strategic decision making. Topics address solutions for measurably higher leads, sales, brand recognition, customer satisfaction or lower service costs.

Prerequisites: Take BAN 610.
Offered: Every year, Spring

BAN 662. Insurance Analytics.3 Credits.

This course leverages predictive modeling and analytics, optimization, and business intelligence to support data-driven decisions in the property-casualty insurance industry. Key topics include measuring underwriting performance, risk analysis and attributes of high performing insurance systems.

Prerequisites: Take BAN 615.
Offered: Every year, Summer

BAN 663. Programming for Data Analysis.3 Credits.

Students learn to program and use R for effective data analysis. Reading data, accessing R packages, writing functions, debugging, profiling code and organizing and commenting code also are covered. Working examples of topics in statistical data analysis are provided. The course also addresses installation and configuration of software as necessary for a statistical programming environment.

Offered: Every other year

BAN 664. Health Care Analytics.3 Credits.

This course provides a foundation on data analytics in health care and an understanding of the main concepts and issues. Contemporary tools and technologies are applied to develop an analytics solution to selected health care problems.

Prerequisites: Take CIS 620.
Offered: Every year, Fall

BAN 690. Business Analytics Capstone.3 Credits.

The capstone course in the MSBA program is designed to enable students to directly utilize what has been learned in the tools and applications courses to analyze and offer solutions for a major business challenge. A definition of the problem, analysis of options and a comprehensive presentation of findings and solutions are required components of the course.

Prerequisites: Take BAN 610 BAN 615 BAN 620 BAN 650 CIS 620 CIS 627 CIS 628.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Summer

Health Management (HM)

HM 404. Legal Aspects of Health Care Delivery.3 Credits.

Students explore fundamental aspects of the law and the American legal system and their effects on our health care system. The course also examines the legal responsibilities and liabilities of an institution's governing board, administrators and clinical staff; and the legal and ethical rights of patients, including the patient's right to informed consent, confidentiality and commitment.

Offered: Every year, All

HM 498. Independent Study.3 Credits.

Independent study offers the opportunity for application of academic learning and study in health service institutions through extended involvement in selected work settings. Advanced students are to make individualized arrangements to spend one, two or three credit hours in supervised investigation of an aspect of health administration typical of the institutions with which they conduct their studies.

Offered: As needed, All

HM 600. Foundations of Health Care Management.3 Credits.

This course expands the student's understanding of: 1) the organization and functions of various health services organizations/systems and their interrelationships; 2) basic concepts of management planning, organizing, leading, staffing and controlling as they relate to issues critical to the mission and strategic positioning of the organization/system; and 3) the utilization of scarce resources to deliver optimum health care at reasonable cost.

Offered: Every year, Fall

HM 621. Quality Management in Health Care Facilities.3 Credits.

This course provides a broad perspective on improving quality in health care facilities. Students gain a working knowledge of accreditation organizations and health care regulatory requirements including the JCAHCO and patient-safety legislation. The course explores patient safety and quality methods as well as the role of consumers in evaluating the quality of the health care services they receive. At course completion, students are able to competently participate in health care quality/patient safety endeavors at all levels of provider, payer, regulatory and accreditation organizations. Students may participate in an onsite project.

Offered: Every year, Fall

HM 626. Epidemiology and Population Health.3 Credits.

This course familiarizes students with the principles and methods of epidemiology and their application to the study of the health of populations--skills becoming increasingly important for health care managers given the advent of Accountable Care Organizations. Students focus on the determinants and distribution of diseases among groups of people, examining infectious and chronic diseases, including diseases and conditions caused by accidents and violence. Emphasis is placed on using epidemiologic data for planning and managing health care services, including preventive services, developing health policy and measuring the outcomes of health care programs.

Offered: Every other year, Fall

HM 630. Corporate Compliance in the Health Care Industry.3 Credits.

This course addresses both the managerial and legal aspects of health care corporate compliance. Essential elements of a compliance program are presented with a focus on various pieces of federal legislation and enforcement initiatives conducted by the U.S. Department of Justice and the Office of Inspector General in the Department of Health and Human Services.

Offered: Every year, Spring

HM 635. Advanced Health Care Compliance: The Legal Issues.3 Credits.

This course provides an in-depth review of the laws and legal issues facing the health care compliance officer and the health care organization. This course is designed primarily for the non-lawyer who needs a comprehensive understanding of the compliance legal issues facing the health care industry. Lawyers wishing to practice in the health care compliance field would also benefit from this course's analysis of the laws in this area and the application of the laws to specific issues pursued by the U.S. Department of Justice and by the Office of Inspector General in the area of health care compliance.

Offered: Every other year

HM 640. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

HM 643. Managed Health Care.3 Credits.

This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Offered: As needed

HM 644. Healthcare Industry Regulation.3 Credits.

This course analyzes and discusses the statutory, regulatory and private contract provisions that govern the delivery of health care by licensed providers. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Offered: As needed

HM 646. Law and Medicine.3 Credits.

A basic, introductory course for students interested in law and medicine, this course covers the legal regulation of the medical profession in such areas as medical education, physician licensure and disciplinary proceedings, hospital organization, alternative structures for providing health care, efforts to control health care costs, the control of drugs and medical devices by the Federal Food and Drug Administration, and the Statutory Regulation of Medical Malpractice Actions. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Offered: As needed

HM 647. Health Care Business Transactions.3 Credits.

This elective course is for students wishing to study health care private law. The course is structured around a trio of (fairly standard) health care business transactions, pursuant to which: 1) the physicians currently affiliated with a local hospital form a physicial practice group; 2) the group and the local hospital create a Physician-Hospital Organization (PHO) that provides various services to the MD group; and 3) the PHO enters into a contract with an HMO to provide medical services to a number of patients. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Offered: As needed

HM 648. Advanced Law and Medicine.3 Credits.

This course provides for in-depth study of issues related to reproductive issues. Both classic and new cases are discussed, as well as some pending cases and legislation. Possible topics include the right to marry; contraception; abortion; forced sterilization in lieu of incarceration; surrogate motherhood; frozen enbroys; cloning; homosexuality; etc. Other topics related to reproduction and of interest to the students also may be considered. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Offered: As needed

HM 657. Health Care Compliance Law.3 Credits.

This course illuminates the legal aspects of health care compliance. At both the federal and state levels, the course addresses the statutory, regulatory, and case law that comprises the complex legal backdrop in which the healthcare industry operates. The course introduces the history, purpose, and substance of health care regulatory compliance programs and addresses legal doctrines concerning reimbursement law and related fraud and abuse, legal restrictions on physician referral and related anti-kickback laws, antitrust law, compliance issues in healthcare business transactions, compliance mandates in the Affordable Care Act, and the law governing healthcare research.

Prerequisites: Take HM 668.

HM 660. Human Resource Management in Health Care Administration.3 Credits.

The policies, organization, procedures and techniques required to develop a positive personnel program and a favorable working climate specific to health care organizations are studied. Labor law for health care facilities is identified as it relates to collective bargaining, unfair labor practices, disputes, union security, reporting and disclosure requirements, contract negotiations and conciliation and mediation procedures. The importance of positive human resource programs in the labor-intensive health care industry is emphasized.

Offered: Every year, Summer

HM 663. Integrated Health Systems and Managed Care.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the integration of provider networks to create more efficient and better coordinated health care systems. The impact of activity on traditional health care provider roles is analyzed. Capitation and other managed care reimbursement techniques and the successes and failures of integrated health systems are examined critically.

Prerequisites: Take HM 600 HM 62.
Corequisites: Take HM 664 - Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.
Offered: Every year, Spring

HM 664. Financial Management in Health Care Organizations.3 Credits.

This course equips the student with a basic understanding of financial management techniques as well as the application of financial theory to the practice of health care administration. Unique problems of financing health care organizations are covered, with special attention paid to using allocation decisions to develop structured financial management systems.

Offered: Every year, Spring

HM 668. Legal Aspects of Health Care Delivery.3 Credits.

This course provides a fundamental knowledge of law and the legal system, examining how they affect health care administration. Three areas of law of special importance to the health care setting are emphasized: tort law, contract law and administrative law. The course also examines the legal responsibilities and liabilities of an institution's governing board, its administrators, and its clinical staff. Finally, the course analyzes the legal and ethical rights of the patient and considers the patient's right to informed consent, confidentiality and commitment.

Offered: Every year, Spring

HM 669. Organization and Management of Long-Term Care Facilities.3 Credits.

This course covers the organization and administration of long-term care facilities. The sociology and psychology of aging as they affect long-term health care also are explored. Concepts of safety and security, labor market trends, city and state codes, and major legislation regulating these facilities are reviewed. The course fulfills the educational requirement for licensure in Connecticut.

Offered: As needed

HM 671. Health Policy and Politics.3 Credits.

This course outlines the role of government in U.S. health policy. Government agencies and other institutions affecting health policy making are covered. The course discusses how the media, advocacy organizations and campaign contributions affect health policy making. It focuses on key interest groups in the U.S. health policy-making process.

Offered: As needed

HM 780. Internship I (degree students only).3 Credits.

This residency offers field experience under the direction of a qualified preceptor in a health services institution. It is designed primarily for those without significant health services administration experience. It is the responsibility of the candidate to locate a residency opportunity appropriate to his or her interests, although faculty will offer suggestions and provide assistance. Minimum of 250 clock hours per semester.

Offered: As needed

HM 781. Internship II (degree students only).3 Credits.

This residency offers field experience under the direction of a qualified preceptor in a health services institution. It is designed primarily for those without significant health services administration experience. It is the responsibility of the candidate to locate a residency opportunity appropriate to his or her interests, although faculty will offer suggestions and provide assistance. Minimum of 250 clock-hours per semester.

Offered: As needed

HM 783. Consulting Practicum I (degree students only).3 Credits.

This practicum is available for students as an alternative to a residency. This practical experience is designed to have a student solve a real problem for a health care organization under the guidance of a faculty member. The practicum includes establishing a relationship in the health care organization in which the practicum is performed; having initial meetings with the responsible faculty member to determine the problem to be solved; gathering pertinent data; analyzing and interpreting information; and preparing a written report for both the organization and the supervising faculty member.

Offered: As needed

HM 784. Consulting Practicum II (degree students only).3 Credits.

A continuation of HM 783, this practicum is available for students as an alternative to a residency. This experience is designed to have a student solve a real problem for a health care organization under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The practicum includes establishing a relationship in the health care organization in which the practicum is performed; having initial meetings with the responsible faculty member to determine the problem to be solved; gathering pertinent data; analyzing and interpreting information; and preparing a written report for both the organization and the supervising faculty member.

Offered: As needed

HM 790. Residency I (non-degree students only).4 Credits.

This 450 clock-hour residency (one semester of a two-semester licensure requirement) is required for students who want to take the state nursing home administrator licensure examination through the LTC certificate program.

Offered: As needed

HM 791. Residency II.4 Credits.

This 450 clock-hour residency (one semester of a two-semester licensure requirement) is required for students who want to take the state nursing home administrator licensure examination through the LTC certificate program.

Offered: As needed

Master Business Administration (MBA)

MBA 601. Foundations for Decision Making (MBA QUick Start).1 Credit.

This course covers basic elements of statistics, technology (including Excel), financial accounting, managerial accounting, finance and economics as well as other fundamental business concepts. The course must be taken during a student's first semester in the MBA program, but can be completed concurrently with MBA 615. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Offered: Every year, All

MBA 602. Communicating Effectively for Managers.3 Credits.

This course provides instruction and practice in the various formats and styles of writing required of executives and professionals in a business environment. This course focuses on the ability to communicate clearly, which is necessary for success in the business world. Students are encouraged to organize thoughts logically, plan communications in advance, write in appropriate formats and communicate ideas concisely. Students learn communication skills necessary for leaders in today's global marketplace. International degree students only.

Offered: Every year, Fall

MBA 610. Business Decision Analysis.3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to basic quantitative tools that enable managers to analyze data and make informed decisions. Topics include descriptive analysis of survey data, introductory probability, sampling and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression and decision analysis. Students apply the quantitative decision-making tools to business situations through cases.

Offered: Every year, All

MBA 615. Managing the Decision Making Process.3 Credits.

This course introduces a framework for formulating, analyzing and making complex business decisions. Students learn to analyze problems from multiple perspectives and different disciplinary points of view and how to evaluate business decisions through an ethical lens. The course provides an overview of business functions with a focus on the need to integrate activities among them for effective decision making. Students learn to evaluate the extent to which an individual or organizational bias affects the decision-making process and identify alternative approaches to mitigating biases.

Offered: Every year, All

MBA 620. Financial and Managerial Accounting for Decision Making (AC 620).3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the use of accounting information for decision making in organizations. Topics include reporting and analysis of financial statement information and the use of managerial decision-making tools to support planning and control. Students can receive credit for either AC 620 or MBA 620 but not both.

Offered: Every year, All

MBA 625. Organizational Behavior and Leadership for Decision Makers.3 Credits.

Students become familiar with both the language and practice of organization theory, including designing organizations, managing the organizational environment and understanding the relationships between tasks, technology, environment and organization structure. Issues related to motivation, leadership, organization culture, decision making and ethical leadership are presented. Interpersonal relationships are explored through an examination of the roles of power, politics and conflict in organizations as well as leader behavior, styles and leadership development. Students also explore how organizational structures and leadership models interrelate with the marketing, operational and financial systems in the enterprise.

Offered: Every year, All

MBA 635. Decision Making for Business Operations.3 Credits.

Students learn to design and manage the production processes that create and deliver the firm's primary products and services to improve performance of the business. The course strongly emphasizes the use of analytical models and methods for the decision-making process. Excel is the platform considered for decision-making purposes. Both tactical day-to-day operating decisions and longer range strategic decisions are examined through topics that include process analysis, product design, workforce management, capacity management (including forecasting), facilities planning, inventory control and quality management. Students also explore the relationship between the production system of the organization and the marketing, financial and human resources systems during the creation of goods and services.

Offered: Every year, All

MBA 640. Financial Decision Making.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the theory and techniques of financial analysis with application to real world problems and situations. Topics include risk and return, asset pricing, capital budgeting and corporate investment decisions, capital structure decisions, dividend policy, corporate merger, divestiture and takeover decisions.

Offered: Every year, All

MBA 645. Marketing Decision Making.3 Credits.

Students learn to formulate, manage and evaluate the marketing strategies that create the firm's products and services and deliver those products and services to the market. Both tactical day-to-day operating decisions and longer range strategic decisions are examined through topics that include buyer behavior, market segmentation, demand estimation, product positioning, product development, branding, pricing, distribution channels, and integrated marketing communications. Students also explore the relationship between the marketing and the overall corporate strategy.

Offered: Every year, All

MBA 650. Strategic Public Relations and Reputation Management.3 Credits.

The focus of this course is reputation management and its importance to business success. Students analyze the function of corporate communications and examine a range of topics including organizational identity, image and reputation; issues and crisis management; institutional ethics and corporate social responsibility; strategic public relations planning; integrated marketing communication; public relations theories and best practices; and global public engagement. The class also explores specialty public relations practice areas such as media relations, investor relations, employee relations and government relations. Class discussions, case studies, in-class exercises, team projects and essay exams help students improve their critical thinking and reasoning skills, develop research and strategic planning skills and increase diversity awareness and sensitivities that are important to professional and business success.

Offered: As needed

MBA 660. Decision Making in a Global Economy.3 Credits.

Students come to understand the global trends and issues that create business opportunities in foreign markets as well as the impact of the global environment on domestic business practices and opportunities. Students examine the economic, social and political issues that affect a firm's strategy for entering international markets and how cross-cultural issues affect internal business processes. Some sections of the course include an international travel experience while others include a virtual study abroad experience. BS/MBA students are required to take a section that includes an international travel experience. Part-time and online students are encouraged to take a section with an international travel component; however, part-time and online students who are unable to complete an international travel experience may take a section of the course with a virtual international experience. Additional course fee (travel) applies to all sections except virtual study abroad.

Offered: Every year, All

MBA 675. Special Topics - MBA.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

MBA 688. Graduate Internship I.3 Credits.

Internships provide students with opportunities to obtain important experience in fields related to their programs of study under the supervision of a sponsoring faculty member and a practicing manager. Prior academic approval is required before registering for any internship course. Details may be obtained from the graduate business programs office. These courses are normally only open to full-time MBA students.

Offered: As needed

MBA 689. Graduate Internship II Administration.3 Credits.

Internships provide students with opportunities to obtain important experience in fields related to their programs of study under the supervision of a sponsoring faculty member and a practicing manager. Prior academic approval is required before registering for any internship course. Details may be obtained from the graduate business programs office. These courses are normally only open to full-time MBA students.

Offered: As needed

MBA 690. Decision Making Capstone.3 Credits.

This is a capstone course in strategic decision making for MBA students. Students learn concepts and theory relevant to the field of strategic management, as well as review and integrate the accumulated functional business knowledge from the other MBA core courses. The course covers such topics as internal and external firm analysis, industry analysis, value chain, competitive strategy, corporate and functional strategy, top management leadership and strategic performance evaluation. Emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking and decision-making skills through company analyses and simulated business exercises. Students can receive credit for either MBA 690 or MG 690 but not both.

Prerequisites: Take MBA 601 MBA 615 MBA 620 MBA 625 MBA 640 MBA 645.
Corequisites: Take MBA 635.
Offered: Every year, All

MBA 699. Independent Study.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

Organizational Leadership (OL)

OL 601. Foundations of Organizational Leadership.3 Credits.

This course explores foundational concepts of modern leadership and reviews traditional leadership theory. Contemporary issues in leadership provide opportunity for practical application and personal reflection.

Offered: Every year, All

OL 610. The Power and Politics of Communication.3 Credits.

This course reviews effective communication techniques at the corporate and individual levels. The study of power and politics of communication includes ethical, cultural and contemporary concepts.

Prerequisites: Take OL 601.
Offered: Every year, All

OL 615. Leadership Across Boundaries.3 Credits.

This course covers the challenges of interacting, managing and leading across cultural differences and national boundaries. The focus is on coordinating and sustaining cooperative activities across various types of boundaries, including cultural, generational, gender, ethnic and regional. Students explore domestic and international differences as well as evaluate the implications of emerging global actors on business practices.

Prerequisites: Take OL 601.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OL 630. Performance Management.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the theoretical and practical application of performance management systems. The importance of an effective performance management system is examined. An effective performance management system includes a continuous process of identifying factors and integrated approaches that align individual and team competencies with organizational goals. Students gain a conceptual understanding of key factors involved in assessing performance management systems in small and large organizations.

Prerequisites: Take OL 601.
Offered: Every year, Spring and Summer

OL 640. Project Management.3 Credits.

This course goes beyond basic project management (PM). Students learn advanced PM technology tools and techniques for managing complex projects and programs. Cases and simulations allow students to learn how these advanced skills are applied to produce business/organizational results that require collaborative relationships. Students can receive credit for only one of the following courses: MG 603, OL 640 and CIS 690.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Summer

OL 650. Leading Organizational Change.3 Credits.

This course examines theoretical concepts and practical techniques of organizational design and change. Students gain a conceptual understanding of leadership skills required for organizational change. The study of leading organizational change includes factors relating to the need for organizational change and the strategy-structure relationship to organizational design with a focus on organizational effectiveness.

Prerequisites: Take OL 601.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OL 662. Ethics and Governance.3 Credits.

This course uses contemporary examples and theoretical perspectives to assess the critical dimensions of ethics in leadership, and explores responsible corporate governance linked to organizational leadership.

Prerequisites: Take OL 601.
Offered: Every year, Spring and Summer

OL 681. Leadership in Human Resources.3 Credits.

In this course, students are introduced to the principles of human resource management. The course balances theoretical and practical approaches with emphasis on the four primary HRM functions of recruiting, selection, performance management and governance. Other areas covered include compensation and benefits as well as challenges of international HRM.

Offered: Every year

OL 682. Employment Law for the Non-Lawyer.3 Credits.

This course introduces the non-legal professional to laws that govern workplace personnel. Students are provided with an overview of legal issues affecting human resource management. The primary concentration is on the practical application of employment law on individuals in organizations and its impact on HR decisions.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OL 683. Employee Development Strategies for Organizational Leaders.3 Credits.

This course provides students with strategic approaches to developing human talent. Students gain knowledge in the area of training, performance development and talent management principles. Focus is placed on how to analyze performance problems as well as how to apply the principles of learning to the individual, the team and organization development.

Offered: Every year

OL 686. Leading Public Service Organizations.3 Credits.

This course examines the challenges and opportunities of public sector leadership. Course participants examine the chief executive's role as a policy maker; dealing with other community leaders and the media; discipline and ethical conduct, and leading in unionized environments. Critical leadership competencies including authenticity, trust building, exercise of power, organizational behavior, and learning to influence the work environment are also examined.

Offered: Every year

OL 687. Strategic Planning for Public Service Organizations.3 Credits.

This course develops skills in systematic planning within a variety of public sector organizational settings. Strategic goal setting, mission-driven plans, managing constrained resources and monitoring and modifying strategic plans in a dynamic environment are emphasized. Participants explore the processes of advanced planning through the analysis of an organization's strategic plan.

Offered: Every year

OL 690. Leadership Consulting Capstone.3 Credits.

This course integrates the knowledge and skills gained throughout the program. The course focuses on the design and implementation of a consulting case/project, including a comprehensive analysis of organizational issues and proposal of appropriate recommendations and implementation plans. The result is a professionally written consulting paper and presentation. The course is ideally taken last in the program.

Prerequisites: Take OL 601 OL 610 OL 615 OL 630 OL 640 OL 650 OL 662.
Offered: Every year, All