The mission of the Department of Management is to: 1) build students’ core competencies in management through engaged learning and real-world application; 2) prepare students for successful careers in their chosen fields; and 3) empower students to use their knowledge, skills and abilities to positively contribute to their organizations and communities. 

In particular, students completing a degree in Applied Business, Human Resource Management, Supply Chain Management, or Talent Management in Sports, eSports, or Entertainment are able to apply management systems to assess employee and organizational needs in different types of organizational environments; utilize qualitative and quantitative models, theories and concepts; communicate in written, oral and digital formats to management at any level; develop recommendations for improvement to organizational processes, practices or policies; demonstrate persuasion, empathy, fairness and an ability to handle conflict when dealing with and responding to coworkers, supervisors, subordinates, customers or suppliers; and acquire advanced knowledge of theoretical underpinnings and current best practices in organizational processes. Students will be agents of change in the workplace by implementing modern, agile workplace strategies.

Management (MG)

MG 110. Leadership Success Factors: Enhancing your Professionalism and Presence.3 Credits.

As students graduate and enter the workforce, understanding professionalism helps them to navigate successfully in their career. This course is designed to help students to know their value and worth, both now and in the future. The course modules are developed to help students to increase their knowledge of human resource management best practices and gain confidence in knowing their negotiation position. Students gain awareness, skills and proficiency.

Offered: As needed

MG 112. A Cause and a Name: Building and Managing a Nonprofit.3 Credits.

This course connects theory and practice by examining a variety of management strategies utilized in running nonprofit organizations. Course readings, discussions and videos cover strategic planning, writing and fulfilling mission statements, facilitating governance, designing effective fundraising tactics, evaluating programs, financial management, and legal responsibilities. The course also covers the formation of the nonprofit sector and its differences from the public and for-profit sectors. Students are strongly encouraged to undertake a volunteer experience with a nonprofit during the semester.

Offered: As needed

MG 120. Take Control of Your Life with Six Sigma.3 Credits.

This course teaches the basic concepts of Six Sigma, which includes process and product improvement principals via minimizing variations and wastes. The methodology is often implemented in manufacturing and service companies, but can be applied to an individual's personal life as well. Through this course, students are able to explain the Six Sigma philosophy, use DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve and Control), define and mitigate variation in processes, and use root cause and Pareto analysis to take the control of a process.

Offered: As needed

MG 130. Art of Persuasion and Negotiation.3 Credits.

Every day, people negotiate with friends, family members, merchants, co-workers, and potential or current employers about matters big and small such as household chores, work schedules, salaries and purchases of items like cars and homes. However, many people do not feel comfortable negotiating and therefore shy away from starting a negotiation even if it means losing an opportunity to better their lives. In this interactive course, students evaluate their personal strengths and weaknesses in negotiations, recognize commonly used manipulative negotiation tactics used by difficult negotiators, learn strategies to prepare for negotiations and to ethically influence and persuade people to move in their direction, and learn to effectively negotiate creative deals that are satisfying for all involved parties.

Offered: As needed

MG 202. Sports Leadership.3 Credits.

This course offers an opportunity for students to explore leadership as a crucial component of success in several contexts, including sports business. Some of the questions this course examines include: How are good leaders developed? What makes a leader successful? How do organizational and situational factors influence leadership? Students explore various leadership theories and topics including leadership development, ethics, motivation, communication, diversity and gender within the context of sports business.

Offered: As needed

MG 205. Organizational Management.3 Credits.

This course introduces the principles of management, covering concepts such as organizations, leadership, and operations. This course prepares students to better understand the management and operations of organizations by integrating management concepts with the student's professional and academic interests. Inspired focus on the importance of developing empathetic, balanced, and transparent leaders. Developing culturally competent, technically savvy individuals that contribute towards the greater good in any organization. Whether the focus is on increased efficiency through trained human capital or advances in organizational processes, the course will prepare students to effect change immediately. Students may not receive credit for MG 105, MG 210 and MG 205.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Breadth Elective, University Curriculum Ele

MG 210. Essentials of Management and Organizational Behavior.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the functions and processes of management. It provides a foundation for managerial thinking, analysis and application. Emphasis is on the foundations of managing organizations.

Offered: Every year, All

MG 211. Operations and Supply Chain Management.3 Credits.

The nature of competition is not between companies but rather between supply chains. This course focuses on the operations in a supply chain framework. Students develop a sophisticated understanding of supply chain perspectives and learn to analyze operational decisions using quantitative models. Topics may include, but are not limited to: purchasing, forecasting, inventory, capacity-planning and information technology.

Prerequisites: Take MA 170 or MA 176 or Take EC 272, MA 206, MA 275 MA 285 or PS 206.
Offered: Every year, All

MG 300. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

MG 301. Group and Virtual Team Processes.3 Credits.

Students gain advanced knowledge of best practices related to effective group processes. This course provides a hands-on, experiential approach to the development of personal and interpersonal competencies that prepare students to excel at working in cross-functional as well as multicultural teams. Contemporary issues related to groups such as virtual teaming also are explored.

Offered: As needed

MG 302. Managing People, Projects and Change.3 Credits.

The course provides a foundation of human resource management practices including: staffing, employment law, training and development, compensation and benefits. Understanding alternative approaches to managing people, strategic projects and organizational change. In addition, the course focuses on creating agile leaders that are mindful, flexible, resilient and cognitively ready to use project management methodologies in the workforce.

Prerequisites: Take MG 105 MG 205 or MG 210.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

MG 303. Immersive Leadership Experience.3 Credits.

You will work with a mentor in an immersive leadership experience on a hands-on project that matters to you as you enhance your creativity, critical thinking, and interpersonal skills while having high community impact. What experiences have helped you to grow as an individual? Do you have a passion project you'd like to lead? What impact would you like to make? This course helps you explore your personal and professional growth while at QU and enables you to express your achievements to others in meaningful ways. Through experiential learning opportunities, coupled with reflective faculty advising, you'll be empowered to transform what you've learned into something tangible that you can share with others to make employers and graduate schools sit up and take notice. Instructor consent required.

Prerequisites: Take EN 101;
Offered: As needed, Fall
UC: Breadth Elective

MG 304. Software Applications for Business.3 Credits.

The course instructs students on the importance of using data to empower informed business decisions. Using Excel, Access and SQL, the course focuses on both the conceptual and technical aspects of designing systems to help managers turn raw data into information.

Prerequisites: Take MG 105 MG 205 or MG 210.
Offered: As needed

MG 305. Applied Design Thinking.3 Credits.

This course uses experiential learning to introduce concepts of design thinking. Students gain hands-on knowledge by using a design thinking process to address real-world problems. Students develop creative thinking and design skills that can be used for both business and non-business organizations.

Prerequisites: Take MG 105 MG 205 or MG 210.
Offered: Every year, Fall

MG 306. Staffing: Recruitment, Selection and Placement.3 Credits.

In this course, students learn how to design and carry out various staffing activities effectively within labor market and legal constraints. Staffing activities include recruitment (whom to recruit, where and when to recruit, and how to recruit); selection (whom to hire and why); and placement (in which jobs, at what time, and in what career progressions).

Prerequisites: Take MG 302.
Offered: Every year, Fall

MG 307. Introduction to Nonprofit Management.3 Credits.

This course connects theory and practice by examining a variety of management techniques utilized in running nonprofit organizations. Course readings, discussions and videos cover strategic planning, writing and fulfilling mission statements, facilitating governance, designing effective fundraising tactics, evaluating programs, managing finances, and legal responsibilities. The course also covers the formation of the nonprofit sector and its differences from the public and for-profit sectors. The class format consists of interactive discussions and applied projects/group work designed to help students understand the nonprofit sector and nonprofit management. Students are strongly encouraged to undertake a volunteer experience with a nonprofit during the semester.

Offered: As needed

MG 308. Women in Leadership.3 Credits.

This course examines challenges and opportunities related to women's leadership development. Topics addressed include research on gender and leadership styles, traits, and effectiveness; effects of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination on women's under-representation in leadership; identity and intersectionality of women's leadership; and strategies for systemic change. The course includes discussion, reflection, and guest speakers. This course provides students with an analytic framework to understand the mechanisms that generate gaps in gender equality in positions of power and leadership and explore interventions to close these gaps.

Offered: As needed

MG 311. Advancing Employment Relations.3 Credits.

The objective of this course is to enable students to evaluate HR policies against principles of employment law and labor relations. Students learn about laws and policies designed to protect equal employment opportunities (e.g., civil rights, disabilities and family leave) and compensate employees for occupational injuries and illnesses. The impact of management on labor relations and the development of managerial approaches to achieve labor-management cooperation are discussed using an ethics and social responsibility lens.

Prerequisites: Take MG 302.
Offered: Every year, Spring

MG 312. Sports Management.3 Credits.

This course offers an opportunity for students to gain information and understanding of the various practices and procedures associated with sport administration and management. Organizational structure, management decisions and challenges, as well as career opportunities at the professional, intercollegiate, interscholastic, youth and community sport levels are explored. The areas of sports tourism, sport management agencies and sport facility and event management are analyzed in terms of their impact on the management and business of sports.

Prerequisites: Take MG 105 MG 210 or MG 205.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

MG 320. Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace.3 Credits.

This course provides the student with an understanding of the role of emotional intelligence in everyday living and in the development of the leadership phenomenon. Topics include: anatomy of emotions; emotional intelligence and self-management; the role of emotional intelligence in business and in leadership development; education for emotional literacy; and assessing emotional intelligence.

Offered: Every year, Fall

MG 321. Data-Driven Decision Making.3 Credits.

This course develops fundamental knowledge and skills for applying management science models to business decision making with applications in Human Resource Management and Operations across manufacturing, service, production, and other environments. Topics may include: optimization and simulation modeling, decision analysis, regression and risk models. In depth use of Excel and/or R.

Prerequisites: Take MG 105 or MG 210 or MG 205 and MG 211.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

MG 325. Negotiations and Problem Solving.3 Credits.

Negotiation is the art and science of securing agreements between two or more interdependent parties. Hence, the purpose of this course, which is grounded in the major concepts and theories of bargaining, negotiation, and mediation, is to develop an understanding of the decision making process in situations that require two or more people to jointly solve a problem that they can't solve on their own. The course covers both psychological and strategic dynamics of negotiation and utilizes a combination of simulations and analysis to help students build their own personal experience in the classroom and in the real world.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

MG 330. Business and Society.3 Credits.

This course aims to introduce students to how business ethics shapes the decision-making process. Students will review how for-profit, and non-profit organizations interact with society and how legal and political environments can impact business. In the course, students will review elements necessary to make ethical decisions by defining the key definitions, issues, and theories of business ethics. Through class discussions and case studies, students explore the theoretical foundations of business ethics and learn how to develop an ability to recognize and address ethical questions. This course helps students learn how to address complex problems and develop decision-making skills to help implement meaningful change and contributions.

Prerequisites: Take SB 101, BLW 221.
Offered: As needed

MG 335. Project Management.3 Credits.

This course addresses the project management processes of initiation, planning, executing, monitoring, controlling, and closing. Topics include: integration, scope, schedule, cost, communications, risk, quality, human resources, procurement management, and stakeholder management. Project management competencies, skills, and tools are applied to more efficiently and effectively execute real world projects.

Prerequisites: Take MG 105 or MG 205 or MG 210; and MG 211.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

MG 340. Transportation and Logistics Management.3 Credits.

This course introduces the strategies, concepts, and techniques of logistics from a supply chain management perspective. Students examine the firm as a complete business operating within an integrated network of suppliers, customers, and logistics activities. Topics include transportation, distribution, supply chain networks, carrier selection, management of incoming supplies and services, storage, and sustainability.

Prerequisites: Take MG 211 or IER 360.
Offered: Every year, Spring

MG 341. Service Operations Management.3 Credits.

This course examines the management of services, focusing on both the strategic and operational aspects of designing new services, assessing and improving service quality, improving the efficiency and effectiveness of service processes, and how new technologies can be integrated into service operations to help achieve these objectives.

Prerequisites: Take MG 211 or IER 360.
Offered: Every year, Fall

MG 342. Supply Chain Analytics.3 Credits.

This course focuses on key supply chain functions and provides hands-on learning to help students understand and analyze data that may be available for the supply chain. The design aspect of supply chain is emphasized. Modeling and deriving insights are facilitated through extensive use of Excel.

Prerequisites: Take MG 211 or IER 360.
Offered: As needed

MG 343. Procurement and Sourcing.3 Credits.

This course explores procurement and sourcing from a supply chain perspective. Students gain an understanding of the procurement process within a global context by applying tools and techniques involved in the purchasing process. Topics include (but are not limited to) the procurement process, strategic sourcing, strategic, tactical and operational issues in procurement decision making, ethics in procurement, buy vs. make decisions, supplier selection and evaluation, supplier development, e-procurement, etc.

Offered: Every year, Fall

MG 345. Training and Development.3 Credits.

Today's ever-changing global marketplace is marked by continual advancements in technologies and associated management processes. In response, HR professionals must create learning environments to expand the knowledge-based capacities of organizations. In this course, students learn how to conduct needs assessments, how to design effective training and development programs to meet those needs and how to evaluate the returns to investments in training and development against organizational goals.

Prerequisites: Take MG 302.
Offered: Every year, Fall

MG 355. Compensation and Benefits.3 Credits.

This course provides students with an understanding of compensation and salary administration in both private and public settings. Additional topics include performance management, pay for performance, employee benefits and overall employee satisfaction. This course provides students with the introduction to compensation analysis skills along with an understanding of best practices in implementing an effective total compensation program in an organization.

Prerequisites: Take MG 302.
Offered: Every year, Spring

MG 360. Power and Politics of Leadership.3 Credits.

A fundamental component for success as a leader is developing a clear understanding of power and influence processes and knowing how to act on that knowledge. The central theories and strategies of leadership within an organizational context are reviewed. Individual expectations and values are considered in terms of their impact upon leading other organizational members. Recent leadership research, practice and experience are examined as a challenge for leaders of the 21st-century business organization.

Offered: As needed

MG 399. Independent Study In Management.3 Credits.

Study designed jointly by student and sponsoring faculty. Permission of adviser and chair required.

Offered: As needed, All

MG 402. Management Senior Seminar.3 Credits.

This course is the culminating course in the supply chain major and the human resource management major, which develops students as whole managers and leaders capable of applying and excelling at technical, human and conceptual skills. Students exhibit the skills needed to analyze, integrate and communicate information both in written and oral formats. Students apply concepts and theory relevant to organizational and individual management. Students think critically when solving organizational issues while being mindful of technology, relevant research and practical application.

Prerequisites: Take MG 302, MG 321, MG 325.
Offered: Every year, Spring

MG 488. Management Internship.3 Credits.

This student-in-residence program includes work experience under the joint supervision of a sponsoring faculty and practicing manager or business owner. Approval of a sponsoring faculty member, the department chair and the assistant dean is required. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Prerequisites: Take MG 210 or MG 205 or MG 211.
Offered: Every year, All

MG 603. Project Management.3 Credits.

This course goes beyond basic Project Management (PM) competencies for students to learn technology, tools, and techniques applicable in any industry and career. This course decomposes the technical and managerial challenges associated with the field of PM. Students learn how these skills can be applied to produce business/organizational results that require collaborative relationships, leadership, integration, and execution. Students can receive credit for only one of the following courses: MG 603, OL 640 and BAN 669.

Offered: As needed

MG 611. Designing Mentoring and Coaching Programs.3 Credits.

This course explores the theories and applications of employee development, mentoring and coaching. Students gain experience in the design, development and operation of formal mentoring and coaching programs in organizations. Return on investment of mentoring and coaching programs and empirically supported best practices are discussed.

Offered: As needed

MG 639. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

MG 641. Supply Chain Resilience.3 Credits.

This course offers an integrated view of analytical decision making in organizations considering supply chain resilient systems that include suppliers, manufacturers, warehouses, transportation, retailers, and services providers. Using current business issues and cases, the course emphasizes on students' analytical skills of evaluating a firm's supply chain resilience and students' problem-solving abilities to propose potential resolutions.

Prerequisites: Take MBA 635.
Offered: As needed

MG 642. Logistics Management.3 Credits.

Logistics ensures the flow of raw materials and finished products in a supply chain. Given the global commerce, the flow of materials has increased the size and complexity of logistical operations. In this course, students develop an understanding of functional areas of logistics: order processing, transportation, inventory, warehousing, materials handling and packaging and facility design. Within these functional areas, students learn to analyze the trade-offs involved with key decisions. The course strongly emphasizes the use of analytical models and methods for the decision-making process. Excel is the platform considered for decision-making purposes.

Offered: As needed

MG 643. Strategic Sourcing and Supply Management.3 Credits.

This course explores strategic sourcing and supply management in the industrial purchasing cycle for operating supplies, raw materials, components and services. The course includes the use of Excel-based analytical models and methods to enhance the decision-making process. Topics include strategic issues relating to the procurement decision process including supplier selection and evaluation, supplier development, make-versus-buy decision, JIT purchasing, e-purchasing and the interrelationships between purchasing and other areas of the organization and the supply chain.

Prerequisites: Take MBA 635.
Offered: As needed

MG 688. Independent Study - Management.3 Credits.

Requires permission from a faculty sponsor and from the MBA director and School of Business dean.

Offered: As needed, All