Department of Management

The mission of the Department of Management is driven by a faculty commitment to serving students in ways that develop them as whole managers and leaders capable of excelling in and integrating both behavioral and technical skills. Students completing the Bachelor of Science in Management gain foundational knowledge of management theory and research. In addition, they garner real-world, hands-on application of those skills to assist organizations in achieving their strategic plans and goals.

In particular, students completing a degree in management are able to administer a variety of management systems to assess employee and organizational needs in different types of organizational environments; communicate models, theories and concepts in written, oral and digital formats to management at any level; develop recommendations for improvement to organizational processes, practices or policies; demonstrate persuasion, empathy, fairness and an ability to handle conflict when dealing with and responding to coworkers, supervisors, subordinates, customers or suppliers; and acquire advanced knowledge of theoretical underpinnings and current best practices in organizational processes.

Management (MG)

MG 105. Organizational Management.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the principles of management, covering concepts such as organizations, leadership, and supply chain management. This course prepares students to better understand the management and operations of organizations by integrating management concepts with the student's professional and academic interests. Students may not receive credit for both MG 210 and MG 105.

Offered: Every year, Spring
UC: Breadth Elective, University Curriculum Ele

MG 210. Essentials of Management and Organizational Behavior.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the functions and processes of management. It provides a foundation for managerial and entrepreneurial thinking. Emphasis is on the foundations of managing large organizations.

Offered: Every year, All

MG 211. Operations Management.3 Credits.

The nature of competition is not between companies but rather between supply chains. This course focuses on the operations in a supply chain framework. Students develop a sophisticated understanding of supply chain perspectives and learn to analyze operational decisions using quantitative models. Topics may include, but are not limited to: purchasing, forecasting, inventory, capacity-planning and information technology.

Prerequisites: Take EC 271 EC 272 MA 206 MA 275 MA 285 or PS 206.
Offered: Every year, All

MG 211H. Honors Operations Management.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the concepts and processes underlying operations management. The course emphasizes how quantitative models and methods can be used to enhance the decision-making process. Operations managers transform human, physical and technical resources into goods and services. Topics include operations systems design, capacity planning, job scheduling, inventory control, project planning, facilities location and layout, total quality management, and forecasting.

Prerequisites: Take EC 271 or EC 272.
Offered: As needed

MG 240. Software Applications for Business.3 Credits.

The course instructs students in business applications of various widely used software packages including Word, Excel and dBase III+, along with the preparation of instructional materials detailing procedures for use of each type of software for everyday business needs.

Prerequisites: Take MG 210.
Offered: Every year, All

MG 260. Power and Politics of Leadership.3 Credits.

The central theories and strategies of leadership within an organizational context are reviewed. Individual expectations and values are considered in terms of their impact upon leading other organizational members. Recent leadership research, practice and experience are examined as a challenge for leaders of the 21st-century business organization.

Prerequisites: Take MG 210.
Offered: As needed

MG 300. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take MG 210.
Offered: As needed

MG 301. Group and Virtual Team Processes.3 Credits.

Students gain advanced knowledge of best practices related to effective group processes. This course provides a hands-on, experiential approach to the development of personal and interpersonal competencies that prepare students to excel at working in cross-functional as well as multicultural teams. Contemporary issues related to groups such as virtual teaming also are explored.

Prerequisites: Take MG 210.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

MG 302. Human Resource Management.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the principles, policies and practices related to human resource management. Students examine various HRM topics such as employee development, engagement, employment relations and law, compensation, recruitment and staffing, which they will likely deal with as future HRM managers and leaders.

Prerequisites: Take MG 210.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

MG 306. Staffing: Recruitment, Selection and Placement.3 Credits.

In this course, students learn how to design and carry out various staffing activities effectively within labor market and legal constraints. Staffing activities include recruitment (whom to recruit, where and when to recruit, and how to recruit); selection (whom to hire and why); and placement (in which jobs, at what time, and in what career progressions).

Prerequisites: Take MG 302.
Offered: Every year, Fall

MG 311. Advancing Employment Relations.3 Credits.

The objective of this course is to enable students to evaluate HR policies against principles of employment law and labor relations. Students learn about laws and policies designed to protect equal employment opportunities (e.g., civil rights, disabilities and family leave) and compensate employees for occupational injuries and illnesses. The impact of management on labor relations and the development of managerial approaches to achieve labor-management cooperation are discussed using an ethics and social responsibility lens.

Prerequisites: Take MG 302.
Offered: Every year, Spring

MG 312. Sports Management (SPS 312).3 Credits.

This course offers an opportunity for students to gain information and understanding of the various practices and procedures associated with sport administration and management. Organizational structure, management decisions and challenges, as well as career opportunities at the professional, intercollegiate, interscholastic, youth and community sport levels are explored. The areas of sports tourism, sport management agencies and sport facility and event management are analyzed in terms of their impact on the management and business of sports.

Prerequisites: Take MG 210.
Offered: Every year, Spring and Summer

MG 315. Self Management.3 Credits.

This course presents an intensive assessment of an individual's personal, psychological makeup so as to increase the ability to manage personal and interpersonal experiences. The premise for the course rests on the assumption that effective management of others begins with management of oneself.

Prerequisites: Take MG 210.
Offered: As needed

MG 320. Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace.3 Credits.

This course provides the student with an understanding and appreciation of the role of emotional intelligence in everyday living and in particular, in the development of the leadership phenomenon. Topics include: 1) Why study emotional intelligence; 2) anatomy of emotions; 3) emotional intelligence and self-management; 4) the role of emotional intelligence in business and in leadership development; 5) education for emotional literacy; and 6) assessing one's own levels of emotional intelligence. Lectures, case studies, personal assessments and small group activities are the essential methodology for this course.

Prerequisites: Take MG 210.
Offered: As needed

MG 321. Decision Making for Managers.3 Credits.

This course focuses on improving managerial decision making and problem-solving skills through the development and use of qualitative and quantitative methods. Extensive use of Excel is emphasized.

Prerequisites: Take MG 210 MG 211.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

MG 335. Project Management.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the initiation, planning and execution of projects with exposure to critical behavioral issues involving intragroup and intergroup collaboration. Special emphasis is on the use of current project management software.

Prerequisites: Take MG 210 MG 211.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

MG 340. Supply Chain Logistics and Technology.3 Credits.

Delivering goods and services in the most efficient and effective way is through supply chain management. This course provides a detailed view of supply chain management with a focus on logistics. Students develop a deeper skills set needed for decision making in supply chain management. Topics may include: supplier management, logistics, supply chain inventory, risk management, sustainability, supply chain technology (ERP) systems and customer relationships.

Prerequisites: Take MG 211 or IER 360.
Offered: Every year, Spring

MG 341. Service Operations Management.3 Credits.

This course examines the management of services, focusing on both the strategic and operational aspects of designing new services, assessing and improving service quality, improving the efficiency and effectiveness of service processes, and how new technologies can be integrated into service operations to help achieve these objectives.

Prerequisites: Take MG 211 or IER 360.
Offered: Every year, Fall

MG 342. Supply Chain Analytics.3 Credits.

This course focuses on several key supply chain functions and provides hands-on learning to help students understand and analyze data that may be available for the supply chain. The design aspect of supply chain is emphasized. Modeling and deriving insights are facilitated through the extensive use of an Excel-based approach.

Prerequisites: Take MG 211 or IER 360.
Offered: Every year, Fall

MG 345. Training and Development.3 Credits.

Today's ever-changing global marketplace is marked by continual advancements in technologies and associated management processes. In response, HR professionals must create learning environments to expand the knowledge-based capacities of organizations. In this course, students learn how to conduct needs assessments, how to design effective training and development programs to meet those needs and how to evaluate the returns to investments in training and development against organizational goals.

Prerequisites: Take MG 302.
Offered: Every year, Fall

MG 355. Compensation and Benefits.3 Credits.

This course provides students with an understanding of compensation and salary administration in both private and public settings. Additional topics include performance management, pay for performance, employee benefits and overall employee satisfaction. This course provides students with the introduction to compensation analysis skills along with an understanding of best practices in implementing an effective total compensation program in an organization.

Prerequisites: Take MG 302.
Offered: Every year, Spring

MG 399. Independent Study In Management.3 Credits.

Study designed jointly by student and sponsoring faculty. Permission of adviser and chair required.

Offered: As needed, All

MG 402. Management Senior Seminar.3 Credits.

This seminar is the capstone course for all management majors culminating in a senior thesis. The course develops students as whole managers and leaders capable of integrating and excelling in both behavioral and technical skills.

Prerequisites: Take MG 301 MG 302 MG 321 MG 335.
Offered: Every year, Spring

MG 488. Management Internship.3 Credits.

This student-in-residence program includes work experience under the joint supervision of a sponsoring faculty and practicing manager or business owner. Approval of a sponsoring faculty member, the department chair and the assistant dean is required. For juniors and seniors. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Prerequisites: Take MG 301 MG 321.
Offered: Every year, All

MG 490. Field Projects.3 Credits.

Students work individually or in teams under the supervision of a faculty member on a field-based problem or project for a for-profit or nonprofit business. For juniors and seniors; faculty adviser and permission of chair required.

Prerequisites: Take MG 301 MG 321.
Offered: Every year, Spring

MG 499. Independent Research (formerly GM 490).1-6 Credits.

Second semester juniors and seniors who wish to pursue a subject in greater depth than is possible in a regular class or to study a subject not covered in the management program may pursue up to six hours of independent study. Approval of a sponsoring faculty, the department chair and the dean is required.

Offered: As needed

MG 603. Project Management.3 Credits.

Designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activities, tasks and techniques of project management, this course focuses on both the behavioral and the analytical skills required for successful project completion. On the behavioral side, the course examines how organizational issues contribute to project success/failure and how effective teams are fashioned. Analytic topics include: cost and resource estimation, Gantt charts, PERT/CPM, and resource load charts. The goal of the course is to provide students with the skills to plan and control complex projects. Students can receive credit for only one of the following courses: MG 603, OL 640 and CIS 690.

Offered: As needed

MG 611. Designing Mentoring and Coaching Programs.3 Credits.

This course explores the theories and applications of employee development, mentoring and coaching. Students gain experience in the design, development and operation of formal mentoring and coaching programs in organizations. Return on investment of mentoring and coaching programs and empirically supported best practices are discussed.

Offered: Every year, Spring

MG 639. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

MG 641. Supply Chain Management.3 Credits.

This course integrates concepts, strategies and analytical techniques to improve production systems that create and deliver a firm's products and services. It offers an integrated view of supply chain systems by including suppliers, manufacturers, warehouses, transportation, retailers and services providers. Based on key concepts such as the value of information, coordinated product and supply chain design, and international supply chain opportunities, the following areas are emphasized: product realization, order fulfillment, production/inventory management, distribution channels and information systems.

Prerequisites: Take MBA 635.
Offered: Every year, Fall

MG 642. Logistics Management.3 Credits.

Logistics ensures the flow of raw materials and finished products in a supply chain. Given the global commerce, the flow of materials has increased the size and complexity of logistical operations. In this course, students develop an understanding of functional areas of logistics: order processing, transportation, inventory, warehousing, materials handling and packaging and facility design. Within these functional areas, students learn to analyze the trade-offs involved with key decisions. The course strongly emphasizes the use of analytical models and methods for the decision-making process. Excel is the platform considered for decision-making purposes.

Offered: Every year, Spring

MG 643. Strategic Sourcing and Supply Management.3 Credits.

This course explores strategic sourcing and supply management in the industrial purchasing cycle for operating supplies, raw materials, components and services. The course includes the use of Excel-based analytical models and methods to enhance the decision-making process. Topics include strategic issues relating to the procurement decision process including supplier selection and evaluation, supplier development, make-versus-buy decision, JIT purchasing, e-purchasing and the interrelationships between purchasing and other areas of the organization and the supply chain.

Prerequisites: Take MBA 635.
Offered: Every year, Fall

MG 688. Independent Study - Management.3 Credits.

A faculty sponsor and permission of the MBA director and School of Business dean are required.

Offered: As needed, All