Department of Finance

The Department of Finance is committed to providing high-quality teaching and learning activities so that graduates are well prepared to compete in the global community.

The BS in Finance prepares graduates for career opportunities in both the financial services sector as well as in nonfinancial businesses. Students can focus on courses that include investment management, including equities and fixed income analysis, asset valuation and portfolio management; wealth management and financial planning; and corporate finance. The program also prepares students for graduate work in finance, business administration, law and other related disciplines.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Finance is to provide a high-quality educational experience for students; produce high-quality scholarly research; and contribute to the intellectual and cultural life of the university and community.

Finance (FIN)

FIN 201. Fundamentals of Financial Management.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of financial management. Topics include the uses and valuation of securities, the structure and purpose of capital markets, financial risk, interest rates and yield curves, and corporate financial analysis and decision making.

Prerequisites: Take EC 111.
Offered: Every year, All

FIN 300. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 310 FIN 320.
Offered: As needed

FIN 310. Investment Analysis.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of investment analysis. Emphasis is on the uses, characteristic and valuation of fixed income securities, equities and derivatives in the global financial marketplace. Students are exposed to both classical and modern theories of evaluating and quantifying financial risk.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 201.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Summer

FIN 315. Financial Planning: A Service Learning Course.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to financial planning, which includes budgeting, credit, insurance and risk management, investments, income tax planning and retirement planning as they apply to consumer decision-making. Students also explore the importance of financial education in reducing poverty and create financial awareness in the community through a service learning project. As part of the service learning project, students design and organize basic financial education workshops for local high school students.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 201;
Offered: Every year, Fall

FIN 320. Financial Modeling.3 Credits.

This course examines standard financial models and data analysis in the areas of capital budgeting, financial statement analysis, asset pricing, portfolio management and performance, hedging and option pricing. Students learn to extract, model and analyze data using computer spreadsheets.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 201.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Summer

FIN 325. Financial Analytics.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the further development of analytical skills used by investors, analysts and managers. Students learn methods of data acquisition and storage. Subsequently, they apply and analyze relevant statistical tools and methods, analyze and interpret the results to aid appropriate decision making.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 320.
Offered: Every year, Fall

FIN 345. Risk Management & Insurance.3 Credits.

This course covers risk management principles and the nature of insurance as a risk-transferring device to reduce various loss exposures. Topics include insurance programs, financial aspects of insurance companies and markets, insurance industry structure, managerial aspects of underwriting and pricing, and public policy issues.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 201.
Offered: Every year, Fall

FIN 350. Financial Markets and Institutions.3 Credits.

This course presents a study of financial markets and intermediaries in a global setting with emphasis on how funds flow from investors in financial assets to investors in real assets. The types and functions of markets and institutions that exist today are discussed along with the differences between them. Topics include the role of monetary policy and the operations of central banks; the regulatory environment in which financial markets and institutions operate; and the financial instruments traded in the markets today.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 201.
Offered: Every year, Spring and Summer

FIN 355. Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits.3 Credits.

This course provides students with an understanding of the retirement planning process. The main objectives are to learn the usefulness of retirement plans and employment-based benefits, and to develop recommendations on important retirement and employee benefit decisions. Topics include: Social Security, qualified retirement plans, nonqualified retirement plans, self-employed plans, IRAs, group life insurance, group disability insurance and group health insurance.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 201.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

FIN 356. Real Estate Finance.3 Credits.

This course examines the structure of real estate markets. Topics include principles of mortgage lending; property appraisal; the secondary mortgage market; mortgage securitization and valuation; residential and commercial real estate investment; leverage and capital structure for real estate project analysis; and real estate investment in the portfolio context.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 201.
Offered: Every year, Spring

FIN 360. Financial Statement Analysis.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the development of analytical skills used by investors and analysts in their evaluation of various financial statements. Topics include the review and analysis of balance sheets, income statements and statements of cash flow; ratio analysis and developing pro forma financial statements to support equity analysis and credit analysis.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 201.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Summer

FIN 370. Commodities.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the fundamental and technical analysis of commodity markets with application to real market problems. Strategy development and risk management are studied with alternative market concepts and unconventional views.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 310.
Offered: Every year, Spring

FIN 380. Intermediate Corporate Finance.3 Credits.

Students gain an advanced understanding of corporate finance. The main objectives are to learn to apply financial concepts, construct and implement financial decision models, and relate various financial theories to one another. Topics include capital budgeting, the valuation of firms, capital structure, cost of capital, dividend policy and risk management.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 201.
Offered: Every year, Spring and Summer

FIN 399. Finance - Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Offered: As needed

FIN 420. Bank Management and Loan Underwriting.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the theory and techniques used to underwrite bank loans and manage a bank loan portfolio. Other fundamental bank processes such as management of liquidity, investment portfolios, funding costs and capital adequacy also are examined. Emphasis is placed on the application of real-world best practices.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 201.
Offered: Every year, Spring

FIN 430. Portfolio Theory and Practice.3 Credits.

This course offers a rigorous examination of the theory and practice of portfolio management. Topics include portfolio construction, valuation and performance measurement. Equity and fixed-income portfolio strategies are considered as well as the use of futures and options in portfolio management.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 310 FIN 320.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

FIN 440. Introduction to Fixed Income Analytics.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the analytical processes associated with fixed income investing. The course bridges the gap between valuing bonds based on a yield to maturity and valuing bonds as a package of zero-coupon instruments. The concepts of theoretical spot rates, par rates of the on-the-run treasury securities, duration and convexity are discussed. A binomial model is explained and used to value bonds that have built-in options.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 201.
Offered: Every year, Fall

FIN 450. Applied Portfolio Management.3 Credits.

Students apply investment and portfolio management techniques and strategies in a real-life environment by managing a portion of the Quinnipiac University Endowment fund--the Student-Managed Portfolio. Students are responsible for developing investment strategies, constructing, monitoring and rebalancing the portfolio, and reporting on actual portfolio performance. Permission of instructor required.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 430.
Offered: Every year, All

FIN 451. Applied Portfolio Management II.3 Credits.

This course is a continuation of FIN 450 for students who have excelled in Applied Portfolio Management I and wish to take a leadership role in the management of the fund. Permission of instructor required.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 450.
Offered: Every year, All

FIN 455. Financial Markets and Monetary Policy.3 Credits.

This course focuses on analysis of the immediate level of economic activity and how the tools of monetary policy can be used to affect future economic activity. Data are obtained from original sources to determine the history of key economic variables and their present status. The economic variables are then utilized to develop a class consensus on the current state of the economy. Based on this class consensus, alternative monetary policy action is considered with a consensus again being developed. A team of students from the class presents the consensus reports to the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston as part of the National College Fed Challenge. Permission of department chair required.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 350 or EC 341.
Offered: Every year, Fall

FIN 455L. Markets and Monetary Policy Lab.0 Credits.

Lab to accompany FIN 455.

Offered: As needed

FIN 460. Mergers and Acquisitions.3 Credits.

This course presents the theory and evidence of corporate acquisitions and restructuring activities. Topics include the foundations of mergers and restructures, the valuation of assets, various means of financing acquisitions, defensive strategies, as well as post-merger, acquisition, and take-over performance.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 380.
Offered: Every year, Spring

FIN 465. Working Capital Management.3 Credits.

This course examines the theory and practice of cash and liquidity management. Topics include cash management, credit and accounts receivable management, collections and cash concentrations, short-term investments and borrowing, forecasting cash flows, and international cash management.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 201.
Offered: Every other year, Summer

FIN 470. Trading Strategies and Practices.3 Credits.

This course introduces financial market microstructure and trading strategies to students. The lectures focus on how trading on exchanges is organized and regulated as well as price formation, informational efficiency and liquidity. Various trading strategies are explored using the Financial Trading Systems (FTS) simulation.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 370.
Offered: Every year, Fall

FIN 480. Valuation of Privately Held Businesses.3 Credits.

This course involves the analysis of company and financial information as well as understanding the impact the economy and industry can have on the value of a private company. Fundamental analysis is examined in detail and applied to private and public corporations. Topics include valuation, forecasting growth and value generation in a firm, assessing the quality of and normalizing earnings, analyzing risk and determining pricing multiples and the cost of capital.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 380.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

FIN 485. Derivative Securities.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to derivatives and the markets in which they are traded. Emphasis is on the techniques for the valuation of options, futures and related contracts as well as the use of derivative contracts in investments, corporate finance and risk management and engineering of structured products.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 310.
Offered: Every year, Spring

FIN 488. Finance Internship.3 Credits.

This internship in finance must be approved by the department chair and the dean in accordance with school and departmental regulations. Junior/senior status is required. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 201.
Offered: Every year, All

FIN 498. Independent Study.3 Credits.

Students may make an individual in-depth study of a topic of current interest in the field of banking or investment management. Objectives and methods must be submitted in writing to supervising instructor prior to time of enrollment.

Offered: As needed

FIN 499. Independent Study in Managerial Finance.3 Credits.

Individual in-depth study of a topic of current interest in the field of managerial finance. Objectives and methods submitted in writing to supervising instructor prior to time of enrollment.

Offered: As needed

FIN 604. Risk Management.3 Credits.

This course provides a broad perspective of risk management including traditional risk management and insurance practices as well as financial risk management and hedging with derivative contracts. Emphasis is on making risk-management decisions that maximize shareholder value.

Prerequisites: Take MBA 640.
Offered: As needed

FIN 610. Global Investments Analysis.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the theory and practice of investment analysis in a global environment. Topics include relative, intrinsic and no-arbitrage valuation models, classical and modern theories of risk and return, introductory asset allocation and portfolio optimization techniques, market structure, and the role of institutions. The emphasis is on equity products, but fixed income and derivative securities also are covered.

Prerequisites: Take MBA 640.
Offered: Every year, Fall

FIN 612. Fixed Income Investments.3 Credits.

This course rigorously evaluates fixed-income securities, including default-free bonds, floating-rate notes and corporate bonds. Closely related financial instruments, such as forwards and futures on fixed-income securities, bond options and interest rate swaps are strongly emphasized. In addition to analyzing specific types of fixed-income securities, students examine the tools used in bond portfolio management.

Prerequisites: Take MBA 640.
Offered: Every year, Fall

FIN 613. Management of Financial Institutions.3 Credits.

This course examines the issues and problems facing bank management with an emphasis on evaluating and measuring bank performance. Extensive case studies are used to illustrate the techniques in the management of assets, liabilities and investments, as well as current studies pertaining to bank regulation, mergers, acquisitions and valuation. Discussions of bank services and competition with other industries also are included.

Prerequisites: Take MBA 640.
Offered: As needed

FIN 615. Emerging Financial Markets.3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to emerging financial markets. Market instruments, regulations and players in these markets are thoroughly covered. The risk and return framework of investing in emerging markets also is explored.

Prerequisites: Take MBA 640.
Offered: Every year, Summer

FIN 616. Derivatives.3 Credits.

This course provides an in-depth analysis of derivative securities (futures, options, swaps, and other contingent claims). Topics include valuation, hedging, market structure, trading strategies and the application of option pricing theory to agency problems, financial contracting and capital budgeting.

Prerequisites: Take MBA 640.
Offered: Every year, Spring

FIN 630. Portfolio Theory and Practice.3 Credits.

This course provides a rigorous examination of modern portfolio theory and practice. Emphasis is on the design of portfolio objectives, advanced asset allocation and portfolio optimization techniques, and the use of futures and options in portfolio management. Legal and ethical obligations also are discussed.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 610.
Offered: Every year, Spring

FIN 660. Cases in Corporate Finance.3 Credits.

An applications-oriented course, FIN 660 deals with cases involving working capital, mergers, corporate valuation and capital budgeting analysis and planning. The course reinforces and applies concepts and techniques from accounting and financial economics in a practical setting.

Prerequisites: Take MBA 640.
Offered: Every other year, Spring

FIN 665. Issues in Equity Compensation.3 Credits.

This course is a seminar in the theory and practice of equity compensation. Students are introduced to the economic and managerial incentives for utilizing equity compensation as well as the agency, corporate governance, valuation and accounting issues that arise when firms utilize equity compensation.

Prerequisites: Take MBA 640.
Offered: As needed

FIN 670. Trading and Exchanges.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the market microstructure of equity markets. The impact of the design, organization and regulation of equity markets on trading is explored. Students utilize real-world trading simulations to learn and reinforce concepts.

Prerequisites: Take FIN 610.
Offered: As needed

FIN 688. Independent Study - Finance.3 Credits.

Permission of the MBA director and School of Business dean is required.

Offered: As needed

FIN 689. Independent Study - Finance.1-6 Credits.

Permission of the MBA Director and School of Business Dean is required.

Offered: As needed

FIN 697. Special Topics in Finance.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed