Department of Entrepreneurship and Strategy

Although some Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management majors will indeed launch their own new business or firm upon graduation, most opt to begin their careers in already established organizations. Indeed, many Quinnipiac students come from a family business background and use this program as a vehicle to develop ideas and plans to be implemented when they join the business. Others find that the entrepreneurial perspective they gain through this program, along with the rich portfolio of learning experiences, provides them with skills of interest to prospective employers in a wide range of industries.

Successful completion of the major provides students with documented evidence of their ability to integrate and apply their business acumen in both directed and self-managed activities. This, coupled with a rich network of faculty, staff, businesses and entrepreneurs eager to assist them in attaining their career goals from the moment they enter the program, provides students with the tools they need to successfully navigate a rewarding career in today’s business environment.

The Department of Entrepreneurship and Strategy values experiential learning and direct contact with businesses, practitioners and entrepreneurs, and provides students majoring in entrepreneurship and small business management with many extracurricular opportunities to expand their skills and stretch their capabilities. These currently include:

  1. The Business Leadership Club provides students with an opportunity to apply what they have learned about the free enterprise system to do social good. Working with Enactus, an organization that encourages the development of business leaders with an entrepreneurial mindset and a desire to improve the world through sustainable change, students can apply what they are learning in the classroom and use their knowledge to better their communities. Guided by their faculty advisers,  student teams design and conduct a variety of community outreach programs that teach free enterprise or use business skills to effect positive change. Projects in the past have included helping budding entrepreneurs get their plans off the ground, mentoring at-risk students in business skills, and designing more efficient inventory management systems for local hospitals.
  2. The Entrepreneurship Club, a Quinnipiac University chapter of the national Collegiate Entrepreneurs’ Organization, is an exciting organization founded in March 2013 that is dedicated to bolstering inventive students, their ideas and their entrepreneurial spirit. Not only can students share their own business ideas and network with fellow peers, but they also can participate in regular meetings and lectures to hear from some of the most successful entrepreneurs Quinnipiac University has to offer. The Quinnipiac Entrepreneurship Club welcomes all students who have an interest in business, entrepreneurship, technology and the drive and desire to create a product or business and take it to the top.
  3. Connecticut Venture Group and the Connecticut State Department of Economic and Community Development sponsor an annual statewide university business model competition. The competition provides prize money to student businesses and is designed to educate students in the process of creating and evaluating business ventures, prepare students for opportunities in entrepreneurship during their future careers, and avail students of the use of the resources and skills of CVG members and venture capitalists to further their educational experience.

Entrepreneurship (ENT)

ENT 210. Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to what it means to be an entrepreneur, and helps them develop an understanding of the philosophy of entrepreneurship and how it can relate to both starting a business and improving an existing business. Students develop their need for achievement and assess themselves as nascent entrepreneurs.

Offered: Every year, All

ENT 250. Entrepreneurial Skills.3 Credits.

This course builds on the skills introduced in ENT 210. Students learn advanced ways to validate their ideas and get extensive hands-on practice using them. They also see how ideas evolve in light of new information, how to identify when they are pursuing a solid idea, and how to help support their fellow entrepreneurs.

Prerequisites: Take ENT 210;
Offered: Every year, Spring

ENT 290. Digital Businesses.3 Credits.

Students form their own teams to develop a digital business idea into a viable business and compete to win money to launch their businesses. Students learn about content creation, business concepts, and presentation skills in preparation for a successful launch.

Prerequisites: Take ENT 210;
Offered: Every year, Fall

ENT 299. Special Topics in Entrepreneurship.3 Credits.

Topics vary. Permission of department chair required.

Prerequisites: ENT 210;
Offered: As needed

ENT 310. Entrepreneurial Creativity.3 Credits.

This course helps students gain an understanding of entrepreneurial creativity as related to the entrepreneur and the venture. Topics of exploration include the creative process, development of a viable product/service, and how to sell creative ideas. From the enterprise level, students learn to proactively manage and promote creativity throughout the venture, develop the creative potential of others, and protect their intellectual capital.

Prerequisites: Take ENT 210;
Offered: Every year, Fall

ENT 320. Small Business Marketing.3 Credits.

This course applies the principles of marketing to the process of developing a marketing plan and strategy for the small business. Students explore how the marketing plan integrates into the overall business plan and how it applies to small business operations and strategy implementation. By reviewing case studies of successful contemporary entrepreneurs, participants develop a further understanding of what personal characteristics and insights the entrepreneur and small business owner must cultivate to be successful in marketing.

Prerequisites: Take ENT 210;
Offered: Every year, Fall

ENT 330. Entrepreneurial Finance.3 Credits.

This course addresses the myriad finance problems faced by the entrepreneur and by new and emerging businesses. The sources of capital--bootstrap, debt and equity--each have their merits and caveats for ownership and management of the new company. Other topics include: valuation of the business for liquidation, purchase, sale or harvest; use of financial ratios; and measuring and evaluating financial performance.

Prerequisites: Take ENT 210;
Offered: Every year, Spring

ENT 340. Opportunity Recognition and Negotiation.3 Credits.

This course helps students identify which resources they need for their business, how to find and assess the quality of entities that can fulfill those needs, and negotiate for the best deal.

Prerequisites: Take ENT 210;
Offered: Every year, Spring

ENT 350. Ventures in Social Enterprise.3 Credits.

Social enterprises use the skills and strategies of business to innovatively and sustainably solve social, environmental and/or economic problems. The ventures created by social entrepreneurs can be nonprofit, for-profit or an innovative hybrid of the two. Drawn from the public service dimension of the University mission, this course provides guidance in the conception, design and execution of experiential service learning projects that fall under the social enterprise domain.

Offered: Every year, Spring

ENT 360. Small and Family Business.3 Credits.

This course helps students understand how to start and/or successfully operate a small or family business. It covers how to develop a business plan, strategies for the business, how to secure financing, marketing the firm, estate planning and succession planning. The course further covers the unique characteristics that distinguish a family business from other small businesses.

Prerequisites: Take ENT 210;
Offered: Every year, Spring

ENT 371. Business Plan Competition.3 Credits.

Students immerse themselves in an intensive entrepreneurial experience where they either delve deep into their own idea or work to develop another's idea. The course functions as a group tutorial in which faculty members coach junior and senior students entering local and national business plan competitions. Permission of instructor and chair required.

Prerequisites: Take ENT 210 ENT 250;
Offered: Every year, Spring

ENT 410. Business Plan Creation.3 Credits.

Students learn to create a comprehensive business plan that provides a step-by-step process to actually create a business.

Prerequisites: Take ENT 210;
Offered: Every year, Fall

ENT 420. Entrepreneurial Implementation I.3 Credits.

In this intensive course, students learn and apply the fundamentals of implementing a successful business. Students implement the business idea that they formulated in ENT 410. Any type of business may be implemented and may include technology firms, service businesses, manufacturing businesses, etc. This course is taken concurrently with ENT 430. Enrollment is by permission only.

Prerequisites: Take ENT 210 ENT 410;
Offered: Every year, Spring

ENT 430. Entrepreneurial Implementation II.3 Credits.

This intensive course is an extension of ENT 420. Students apply the fundamentals of implementing a successful business. This course is taken concurrently with ENT 420. Enrollment is by permission only.

Prerequisites: Take ENT 210 ENT 410;
Offered: Every year, Spring

ENT 488. Entrepreneurship Internship.3 Credits.

Students gain work experience under the joint supervision of a faculty member and practicing manager or business owner. Students must meet School of Business internship requirements. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Prerequisites: Take ENT 210;
Offered: Every year, All

ENT 490. Field Projects.3 Credits.

Students work independently or as part of a team on a project or topic of their choice under the supervision of a faculty member. The project may involve researching a special entrepreneurship topic, working on an aspect of a new business startup or working with a business or organization.

Offered: As needed

ENT 499. Independent Research in Entrepreneurship.1-6 Credits.

Approval of a sponsoring faculty, the department chair and the dean is required.

Offered: As needed

ENT 610. Entrepreneurship and Franchising.3 Credits.

Franchising is a $1 trillion direct sales business. To some financial analysts, franchising is the purest form of capitalism and entrepreneurship. This course looks at how entrepreneurs can expand their business model by adapting the franchise model. Students examine the benefits of franchising, and the hurdles and pitfalls to avoid. Participants use actual cases of entrepreneurs, develop a franchise model and make a final presentation to a panel of entrepreneurs and successful franchisors.

Offered: Every year, Fall

ENT 620. Corporate Entrepreneurship.3 Credits.

This course is designed for intrapreneurs who want to apply their entrepreneurial spirit to innovate within established organizations, as well as for managers whose goal is to build and manage innovation processes in the organization. Students learn techniques and best practices that combine innovation strategies, start-up thinking and entrepreneurial methods to accomplish organizational innovation in its many forms, from product/service innovation and business model innovation, to innovation for social and environmental purposes. The course uses case studies, readings and projects.

Offered: Every year, Fall

ENT 625. Entrepreneurship Independent Study.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

ENT 626. Business Plan Competition.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed

ENT 688. Entrepreneurship Ind Study.3 Credits.

ENT 689. Entrepreneurship Ind Study.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed