Department of Engineering

The Department of Engineering prepares students for careers that allow them to change the world for the better. The challenges of the 21st century for both the U.S. and the world are great, but for engineers and computer scientists, they offer exciting challenges and a world of possibilities. Our programs are aimed at developing creative problem solvers, who learn math, science and fundamentals so that they can apply them in solving the ever-changing problems of tomorrow. Our emphasis on application and learning by doing, all in a small class setting, prepares our graduates to successfully enter the workforce or pursue further education.

All engineering programs will be assessed in the ongoing ABET cycle of accreditation, self-study and continuous improvement and are seeking initial accreditation by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET Inc. (ABET.org).

Civil Engineering (CER)

CER 210. Infrastructure Engineering.3 Credits.

This course identifies, analyzes and assesses built infrastructure, which is the foundation for modern society. The complex and interconnected lifecycles are investigated and demands on critical components are calculated. Students explore the nontechnical factors necessary for the functioning of infrastructure including supplies, trained personnel, public policy, ethics and cross-sector dependencies. The course provides a basis for understanding the complexity and cost of maintaining, rebuilding and developing infrastructure. Topics include general infrastructure concepts, water and wastewater, transportation, energy and buildings and cities. Several in-class scenarios are provided to synthesize the connectivity between the major items of infrastructure.

Offered: Every year, Fall

CER 220. Civil Engineering Site Design.3 Credits.

This course provides students with the necessary background to select and develop sites for civil engineering projects as well as review the work of others. Proper site selection and engineering have a significant impact on the economics of a project and long-term utility of the constructed facility. Specifically, the course covers the skills of determining site layout and access, zoning requirements, establishing site contour and drainage, installation of utilities, elementary surveying, creation of drawings using a computer-aided drafting package, and the development of environmental impact statements.

Prerequisites: Take MA 152;
Corequisites: Take CER 220L;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CER 220L. Civil Engineering Site Design Lab.0 Credits.

Lab to accompany CER 220.

Prerequisites: Take MA 152;
Corequisites: Take CER 220;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CER 230. Advanced Surveying.3 Credits.

This course extends the work and concepts covered in CER 220 Civil Engineering Site Design. Students concentrate on larger and more comprehensive projects. A focus on the use of GPS AutoCAD and GIS complements existing surveying skills. Students study coordinate systems and land records as well as field and office practices.

Prerequisites: Take CER 220;
Offered: As needed

CER 300. Ecological Engineering.3 Credits.

Ecological engineering is the design of sustainable ecosystems that integrate human society with its natural environment for the benefit of both. This course will explore the basic concepts of ecological engineering for design applications including wetland creation and restoration, pollution control by ecosystems, restoration/rehabilitation of forests, grasslands, lakes, reservoirs and rivers and the development of engineered sustainable ecosystems.

Offered: As needed

CER 310. Structural Analysis.3 Credits.

This course addresses the analysis and design of basic structural forms such as beams, trusses and frames, which are found in bridges and buildings. Classical deflection techniques such as direct integration and virtual work; and indeterminate analysis techniques such as the force method and displacement methods (slope deflection, direct stiffness and moment distribution) are used to determine forces and deflections in elastic structures. Structural analysis computer programs are introduced and directly applied in the solution of graded analysis and design problems. Approximate analysis techniques are used to check the general accuracy of computer-based results.

Prerequisites: Take MER 220;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CER 315. Surface Water Hydrology.3 Credits.

This course covers hydrologic processes relevant to surface water hydrology, including precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration, surface runoff and streamflow. Global issues including climate change and sustainable development are discussed.

Prerequisites: Take MER 310;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

CER 320. Design of Reinforced Concrete.3 Credits.

This course introduces the design and control of concrete mixtures as well as the analysis and design of reinforced concrete structures. Current codes and industry standards are used to guide the practical design of beams, slabs and columns.

Prerequisites: Take CER 310;
Corequisites: Take CER 320L;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CER 320L. Design of Concrete Structures Lab.1 Credit.

This laboratory uses concrete mix design and strength testing labs to develop the concept of proportioning constituents for quality concrete and to provide a background in materials testing techniques, quality control and sound construction practices.

Prerequisites: Take CER 310;
Corequisites: Take CER 320L;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CER 330. Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the field of environmental engineering with an emphasis on basic principles, design, problem solving, analytical skills and sustainable solutions to environmental engineering problems. Topics include water chemistry, mass balance, water treatment, water quality and pollution control.

Prerequisites: Take CHE 110;
Corequisites: Take CER 330L;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CER 330L. Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering Lab.0 Credits.

Lab to accompany CER 330.

Prerequisites: Take CHE 110;
Corequisites: Take CER 330;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CER 340. Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering and Foundation Design.4 Credits.

Soil mechanics is the study of soil properties, which govern the use of soil as a construction or foundation material. The course is devoted to describing soils, analyzing soil stresses, determining consolidation settlement, designing earth embankments, determining earth pressures and designing foundations based on applicable engineering principles and recognition of the fundamental concepts of soil behavior. During laboratory periods, students examine soil properties and extract necessary parameters for design.

Prerequisites: Take MER 210;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CER 340L. Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering and Foundation Design Lab.0 Credits.

Lab to accompany CER 340.

Prerequisites: Take MER 210;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CER 350. Hydrology/Hydraulic Design.4 Credits.

This course studies both hydrology, which is the study of occurrence, movement and distribution of rainfall, and hydraulic design, which is the application of fluid mechanics, physical science and engineering disciplines in the design of structures and development of water resources. Hydrologic principles are applied to model and analyze the distribution and movement of rainfall in a watershed. Hydraulic principles are applied to analyze and design flow-through systems of reservoirs, channels and culverts. The course makes extensive use of computer simulation models used in engineering practice.

Prerequisites: Take MER 310;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CER 350L. Hydrology/Hydraulic Design Lab.0 Credits.

Lab to accompany CER 350.

Prerequisites: Take MER 310;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CER 360. Construction Management.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the implementation of various projects in which a civil engineer may be engaged, including planning and feasibility studies, design and construction. Students study topics relating to the management of construction, including scope of work, rough order-of-magnitude estimating, scheduling, planning, progress reporting, resource constraining and quality control. The roles of the contractor, owner, public entities and designer are explained.

Prerequisites: Take ENR 210;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CER 370. Materials Engineering for Civil Engineers.3 Credits.

This course introduces the fundamental properties of civil engineering materials, including mechanical, chemical, physical, surface, fracture and rheological properties. The materials discussed are cements, metals, asphalt, wood and composites. Special effort is directed at learning new sustainable construction materials and practices, including alternative binders for concrete and methods for increasing the service life of civil engineering infrastructure.

Prerequisites: Take CHE 110;
Corequisites: Take MER 220;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

CER 405. Ecological Engineering.3 Credits.

Ecological engineering is the design of sustainable ecosystems that integrate human society with its natural environment for the benefit of both. This course explores the basic concepts of ecological engineering for design applications including green infrastructure, wetland creation and restoration, restoration/rehabilitation of forests, grasslands, lakes, reservoirs and rivers and the development of engineered sustainable ecosystems.

Prerequisites: Take CER 350 CER 350L;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

CER 410. Design of Steel Structures.3 Credits.

The course synthesizes the fundamentals of statics, mechanics of materials and structural analysis and applies them to the design of structural members, with emphasis on satisfying real-world needs. Topics include an introduction to the design of structural systems, steel tension and compression members, beams and beam-columns and connections. All design is performed in accordance with codes and specifications used in current engineering practice. A comprehensive design problem requires development of a design methodology, consideration of alternative solutions and design of an optimal steel structure to meet stated functional requirements.

Prerequisites: Take CER 310;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

CER 415. Advanced Structural Analysis.3 Credits.

This course builds upon the material covered in CER 310 to develop a better understanding of structural behavior. Matrix analysis methods, including an introduction to finite elements, are developed as the basis for modern, computer-based structural analysis. These and other advanced analytical techniques are used to analyze and design trusses, beams and frames. Course work involves extensive use of the computer as an analytical tool. Students use state-of-the-art structural engineering analysis and design software.

Prerequisites: Take CER 310;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

CER 430. Transportation Engineering.3 Credits.

This course provides students with a solid introduction to the principles of transportation engineering with a focus on highway engineering and traffic analysis. The material learned provides the basic skill set that enables students to solve transportation problems that are likely to appear in professional practice, on the Fundamentals of Engineering exam (FE), and on the Principles and Practice of Engineering exam (PE).

Prerequisites: Take MER 220;
Offered: As needed

CER 435. Geotechnical Aspects of Transportation Infrastructure.3 Credits.

Students are exposed to the geotechnical aspects of transportation systems, with a strong focus on pavement design (both rigid and flexible). Basic transportation topics necessary for the geotechnical design of roads are covered.

Prerequisites: Take CER 340;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

CER 440. Introduction to Power and Energy Systems.3 Credits.

This course includes an overview of power generation and distribution systems. Students focus on civil and environmental engineering issues as they pertain to power systems. They also learn additional basic-level skills in electrical engineering that enable them to solve straightforward generation and distribution problems. Topics include: the relationship between water and energy, environmental implications of power generation, air quality monitoring, stationary source control, residuals management and current public policy issues related to these systems.

Prerequisites: Take PHY 122;
Offered: As needed

CER 445. Advanced Geotechnical Engineering and Foundation Design.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the analysis and design of shallow and deep foundations. Other topics include field testing, structural design of footings, and the geotechnical aspects of retaining wall design and excavations.

Prerequisites: Take CER 340;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CER 450. Water and Waste Water Technology.3 Credits.

Students study technical engineering solutions to problems regarding water processing, water distribution, wastewater collection, and wastewater treatment. Advanced technical topics include: water distribution and sewerage system design, unit process design and environmental biotechnology.

Prerequisites: Take CER 330;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

CER 455. Advanced Environmental Engineering.3 Credits.

Students extend what they learned in the Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering course. This course provides a more in-depth look at environmental policies and regulations concerning water and air and their implications on design. Case studies and design projects allow students to focus on both technical and nontechnical issues associated with environmental projects. Advanced technical topics include: biological treatment, cell growth kinetics, sludge treatment/disposal, landfills, air pollution control, hazardous waste, contaminant transport, quantitative risk assessment and advanced water treatment.

Prerequisites: Take CER 330;
Corequisites: Take CER 455L;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CER 455L. Advanced Environmental Engineering Lab.0 Credits.

Lab to accompany CER 455.

Prerequisites: Take CER 330;
Corequisites: Take CER 455;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CER 460. Wood and Masonry Design.3 Credits.

This course teaches the engineering thought process through the design of wood and masonry structures. The course synthesizes the fundamentals of statics, mechanics of materials, and structural analysis and applies them to the design of structural members, with emphasis on satisfying real world needs. All design is performed in accordance with codes and specifications used in current engineering practice. A comprehensive design problem requires development of a design methodology, consideration of alternative solutions, and design of an optimal timber and masonry structure to meet stated functional requirements.

Prerequisites: Take CER 310;
Offered: As needed

CER 465. Hazardous Waste and Environmental Site Assessment.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to hazardous waste management and preliminary site investigations for environmental hazards. Topics include identification of wetlands, title searches, air photo interpretation for environmental hazards, visual site surveys, operation of environment monitors, current EPA regulations regarding site assessment and investigation, and sampling of surface materials. Additional course work focuses on hazardous waste; in particular, the legal framework, chemistry, quantitative risk assessment and remediation.

Prerequisites: Take CER 330;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

CER 470. Water Quality.3 Credits.

This course introduces basic chemical principles and applications to the analysis and understanding of aqueous environmental chemistry in natural waters and wastewaters. Topics include modeling of chemical systems, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, temperature and toxic substances with applications to groundwater, rivers, lakes, estuaries and coastal waters.

Prerequisites: Take CER 330;
Offered: As needed

CER 475. Groundwater Hydrology and Contaminant Transport.3 Credits.

Students analyze groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface. Topics include geologic and physical factors affecting the movement of water and contaminants, sources of pollution, mathematical formulation and solution of groundwater flow and transport problems, remediation methods and an introduction to computer simulation models.

Prerequisites: Take CER 330 CER 340 CER 350;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

CER 485. Slope and Earth Structures Stability.3 Credits.

Students deepen their understanding of the mechanical behavior of slopes and earthen structures. The focus of this course is on the design, construction and performance of slopes and earthen structures.

Prerequisites: Take CER 340;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

CER 490. Engineering Professional Experience.1 Credit.

Students gain experience by employing engineering skills in a professional setting under the guidance of practicing engineers. Students must obtain departmental approval and register prior to starting the experience. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of adviser.

Prerequisites: Take ENR 395
Offered: Every year, All

CER 498. Design of Civil Engineering Systems.3 Credits.

This course provides an opportunity for students to apply and synthesize their knowledge of civil engineering. Multidisciplinary teamwork is emphasized. Course work from the various subdisciplines of civil engineering provides the foundation for this course. Students develop requirements, generate alternatives, make practical engineering approximations, analyze feasibility and make decisions leading to a completed design. The design includes principles of sustainability taking into account realistic constraints. These may include economic, environmental, legal and cultural issues. Deliverables include a comprehensive design report including drawings and a client briefing. This course provides an integrative experience that supports the overarching academic program goal.

Prerequisites: Take CER 310 CER 330 CER 340 CER 350;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CER 499. Independent Study in Civil Engineering.3 Credits.

On an individual or small group basis, students pursue advanced study of a research or design topic in civil engineering. The scope of the course is tailored to the needs of the project and desires of the student, in consultation with the faculty adviser. The student is required to define and analyze the problem, study the fundamentals involved, organize an approach, determine a procedure, perform research and/or achieve a solution, submit a written report and give a formal briefing. Requires permission of the instructor.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

Computer Science (CSC)

CSC 101. Introduction to Internet Studies.3 Credits.

This course covers the history of the Internet, software and hardware connected with the Internet, the Internet and commerce, and education and social issues. The future of the Internet also is explored. Browsers, search engines, and email software packages are examined. The HTML markup language is introduced.

Offered: As needed

CSC 105. Introduction to Computer Science.3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the field of computer science. Students learn about the history of computers and computing and explore the many disciplines that comprise this dynamic field such as operating systems, graphics and artificial intelligence. The algorithmic thinking necessary in the creation of computer programs is covered as students create 3D "movies" by providing instructions to characters in an animation.

Offered: As needed

CSC 109. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed, All

CSC 110. Programming and Problem Solving.3 Credits.

This course serves as an introduction to computer science and computer programming. Topics include fundamental programming constructs; problem-solving techniques; basic data and control structures; testing; debugging; arrays; and an introduction to object-oriented programming. A lab is included.

Corequisites: Take CSC 110L;
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

CSC 110L. Programming and Problem Solving Lab.1 Credit.

Students gain experience in the practice of programming and problem solving by completing a series of hands-on activities, which increase in complexity, covering a range of topics from the CSC 110 course. This course is taken in conjunction with CSC 110.

Corequisites: Take CSC 110;
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

CSC 111. Data Structures and Abstraction.3 Credits.

This course is a continuation of CSC 110. Topics include advanced data structures (linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, hash tables), recursion, abstract data types, introductory algorithms, and intermediate object-oriented programming. A lab is included.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 110-110L; Minimum grade C-;
Corequisites: Take CSC 111L;
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

CSC 111L. Data Structures & Abstraction Lab.1 Credit.

Students gain experience in data structures programming by completing a series of activities, which increase in complexity, covering a range of topics from the CSC 111 course. This course is taken in conjunction with CSC 111 .

Prerequisites: Take CSC 110;
Corequisites: Take CSC 111;
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

CSC 199. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Offered: As needed

CSC 200. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed, All

CSC 205. Introduction to Discrete Mathematics (MA 205).3 Credits.

This course introduces students to basic concepts and structures of discrete mathematics. Topics can include propositional and predicate logic, sets and set operations, functions, proof techniques, counting problems, probability and basic number theory. Applications include computer science, biology, social sciences, law and the physical sciences.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 110-110L or MA 110 or higher; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CSC 210. Computer Architecture and Organization.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the organization and architecture of computers. Topics related to computer organization include digital logic, data representation, computer arithmetic, data path and control unit implementation, memory system organization, and I/O communications. Architecture topics include machine language programming, instruction set design, and factors affecting processor performance. A lab component is included.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 111 CSC 111L; Minimum grade C-:
Corequisites: Take CSC 210L;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CSC 210L. Computer Architecture and Organization Lab.1 Credit.

Students design and implement digital circuits of increasing complexity using abstraction to manage complexity. Students implement Assembly Language programs that demonstrate the instruction set architecture interface between hardware and software. This course is taken in conjunction with CSC 210.

Corequisites: Take CSC 210;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CSC 215. Algorithm Design and Analysis.3 Credits.

This course presents a study of the design and analysis of algorithms. Topics include Asymptotic Analysis, Complexity Theory, Sorting and Searching, Underlying Data Structures, Recursion, Greedy Algorithms, Divide and Conquer, Dynamic Programming, and NP-completeness. Additional topics may include Graph Algorithms, Probabilistic Algorithms, Distributed Computing and Parallel Algorithms.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 111 CSC 111L CSC 205; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CSC 225. Introduction to Software Development (SER 225).3 Credits.

This course presents introductory software development concepts including group development, large-scale project work and theoretical aspects of object-oriented programming. The course expands on material from previous courses. Professional behavior and ethics represent an important component of this course.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 111-111L; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CSC 299. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Offered: As needed

CSC 300. Special Topics.3 Credits.

Offered: As needed, All

CSC 310. Operating Systems and Systems Programming.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to operating systems and the software to support these systems. Topics include operating system principles, concurrency, scheduling and dispatch, virtual memory, device management, security and protection, file systems and naming, and real-time systems.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 210 CSC 225; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every year, Fall

CSC 315. Theory of Computation (MA 315).3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the classical theory of computer science. The aim is to develop a mathematical understanding of the nature of computing by trying to answer one overarching question: "What are the fundamental capabilities and limitations of computers?" Specific topics include finite automata and formal languages (How do we define a model of computation?), computability (What can be computed? and How do we prove something cannot be computed?), and complexity (What makes some problems so much harder than others to solve? and What is the P versus NP question and why is it important?).

Prerequisites: Take CSC 215 or MA 301; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

CSC 318. Cryptography (MA 318).3 Credits.

Students study methods of transmitting information securely in the face of a malicious adversary deliberately trying to read or alter it. Participants also discuss various possible attacks on these communications. Students learn about classical private-key systems, the Data Encryption Standard (DES), the RSA public-key algorithm, discrete logarithms, hash functions and digital signatures. Additional topics may include the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), digital cash, games, zero-knowledge techniques and information theory, as well as topics chosen by the students together with the instructor for presentations.

Prerequisites: Take MA 229 or CSC 215 or ISM 301; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

CSC 320. Compilers.3 Credits.

This course presents a study of the design and implementation of compilers. Topics include translators and compilers, lexical analysis, syntax analysis and parsing, runtime environments, and code generation.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 210 CSC 215 CSC 225; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

CSC 325. Database Systems (SER 325).3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the theory and application of database systems. Topics include data modeling and the relational model, query languages, relational database design, transaction processing, databases and physical database design.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 215 CSC 225; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

CSC 340. Networking and Distributed Processing.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to net-centric computing, the Web as an example of client-server computing, building Internet and web applications, communications and networking, distributed object systems, collaboration technology and groupware, distributed operating systems and distributed systems.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 215 CSC 225; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

CSC 345. Computer Graphics.3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to theory and programming in computer graphics. Topics include graphic systems, fundamental techniques in graphics, basic rendering, basic geometric modeling, visualization, virtual reality, computer animation, advanced rendering and advanced geometric modeling.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 215 CSC 225; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

CSC 350. Intelligent Systems.3 Credits.

Artificial Intelligence is an umbrella topic covering efforts in a variety of fields all searching for one goal: to get computers to perform well at tasks at which humans excel. Topics include fundamental issues in intelligent systems, search and optimization methods, knowledge representation and reasoning, learning, agents, computer vision, natural language processing, pattern recognition, advanced machine learning, robotics, knowledge-based systems, neural networks and genetic algorithms.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 215 CSC 225; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

CSC 355. Programming Language Concepts.3 Credits.

This course represents an introduction to different paradigms of programming languages and their role in the problem-solving process. Topics covered include history and overview of programming languages, introduction to language translation, language translation systems, models of execution control, declaration, modularity, and storage management, programming language semantics, functional programming paradigms, object-oriented programming paradigms, logic programming paradigms, language-based constructs for parallelism.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 215 CSC 225; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

CSC 361. Numerical Analysis (MA 361).3 Credits.

This course covers selected techniques for obtaining numerical values of functions, solving linear and nonlinear equations, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, error analysis and numerical stability.

Prerequisites: Take MA 142 or MA 152 and MA 229; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: As needed

CSC 375. Advanced Topics in Computer Science.3 Credits.

This course explores advanced computer science topics not available in other courses, as well as new topics as they emerge in this rapidly evolving discipline. Topics may be interdisciplinary.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 215 CSC 225 Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CSC 399. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

CSC 491. Senior Project 1.1 Credit.

This is the first of a two-course sequence required for all computer science majors (beginning with students who entered the program in 2006). Students explore the profession of computing by working independently, under the guidance of a faculty member, on a significant computing project. Participants review professional literature and explore professional ethics, as they work to synthesize their knowledge of computer science. During the first part of the project, students develop a project plan and submit a proposal for approval to their adviser. Students meet regularly to present and discuss progress. Senior status is required.

Offered: Every year, Fall

CSC 492. Senior Project 2.1 Credit.

This is the second of a two-course sequence required for all computer science majors (beginning with students who entered the program in 2006). Students explore the profession of computing by working independently, under the guidance of a faculty member, on a significant computing project. Participants review professional literature and explore professional ethics, as they work to synthesize their knowledge of computer science. During the second part of the project, students complete work on their project, and create an appropriate formal presentation of their results.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 491 Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CSC 493. Senior Thesis I.1 Credit.

This course is the first part of a two-semester series in which students work independently under the guidance of a faculty member on the development of a senior thesis. The CSC 493/CSC 494 course sequence provides students with an opportunity to synthesize their knowledge of computer science. Students explore the profession of computing by engaging in the professional literature and exploration of professional ethics. Students meet regularly to present and discuss progress. During the first course in the sequence, students develop a proposal for their thesis, including a literature review, and submit to their adviser for approval.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 215 CSC 225 and senior status is required
Offered: Every year, Fall

CSC 494. Senior Thesis II.3 Credits.

This course is the second part of a two-semester series in which students work independently under the guidance of a faculty member on a significant thesis culminating in the development of a senior thesis. The CSC 493/CSC 494 course sequence provides students with an opportunity to synthesize their knowledge of computer science. Students explore the profession of computing by engaging in the professional literature and exploration of professional ethics. Students meet regularly to present and discuss progress. During the second part in the sequence, students complete the thesis proposed in CSC 493.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 493;
Offered: Every year, Spring

CSC 499. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Engineering (ENR)

ENR 110. The World of an Engineer.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the study and practice of engineering, including overviews of specific disciplines. Participatory focus involves group design projects, hands-on learning, computer work, team building and engineering ethics discussions.

Offered: Every year, Fall

ENR 210. Engineering Economics and Project Management.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the concepts of economics/finance/costing and explains how these affect the engineering functioning and contribute to decision making in engineering operations. A portion of the course covers the concepts of project management, team building and leading teams that are used throughout the program and in professional practice.

Prerequisites: Take MA 141 or MA 151
Offered: Every year, Spring

ENR 395. Professional Development Seminar.1 Credit.

Through discussions, case studies and guest speakers, students are introduced to topics on engineering professionalism, ethics and licensure as well as relevant innovations in engineering to prepare them to enter the workplace as engineering professionals. Prerequisite: Junior status in the major or permission of instructor.

Offered: Every year, Fall

ENR 490. Engineering Internship.1 Credit.

Students gain experience by employing engineering skills in a professional setting under the guidance of practicing engineers. Students must obtain approval and register prior to starting the work experience. Prerequisite: Must have completed 3rd year engineering curriculum for major. Faculty approval required. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of adviser.

Prerequisites: Take ENR 395;
Offered: Every year, All

Industrial Engineering (IER)

IER 310. Operations Research I.3 Credits.

This course provides a rigorous introduction to the principles of operations research with a focus on linear programming models and simplex method, duality and sensitivity analysis; transportation and assignment problems; network models; integer and nonlinear programming; an introduction to queuing theory and Markov Chains.

Prerequisites: Take MA 152 or MA 241;
Offered: Every year, Fall

IER 311. Operations Research II.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to stochastic processes for analysis of industrial engineering problems, emphasizing examples, applications and cases.

Prerequisites: Take IER 310;
Offered: As needed

IER 320. Production Systems.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to production systems, classification, general terminology, technical aspects, economics and analysis of manufacturing systems. Students learn the fundamentals of automation and control technologies as well as manufacturing support systems. Sophomore status required.

Offered: Every year, Fall

IER 330. Lean Systems Engineering.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive and hands-on introduction to Lean Systems and its wide applications, with special emphasis on the Toyota Production System.

Prerequisites: Take IER 320;
Offered: Every year, Fall

IER 335. Systems Engineering and Management.3 Credits.

This course discusses the theory and methods used to design, analyze and manage engineered systems. Students review the principles of system life-cycle management including requirements analysis, system design, functional decomposition, configuration management and systems evaluation. Topics of engineering management emphasizing human relationships, motivational theory and human-systems integration also are addressed.

Prerequisites: Take IER 320;
Offered: Every year, Spring

IER 340. Physical Human Factors and the Workplace.1 Credit.

This course analyzes the impacts of the physical factors of the human decision makers on workflow and efficiency. Basic concepts of anthropometry, biomechanics, work physiology, stress and workload as well as work measurement are introduced. Special emphasis is placed on the capabilities and limitations of humans, in human-centered design of systems and products.

Prerequisites: Take ENR 110;
Offered: Every year, Fall

IER 350. Facilities Layout and Material Handling.3 Credits.

The focus of this course is the design of industrial facilities with consideration of work organization and layout. Students study product and process designs as a part of facilities planning, material handling systems, flow systems, departmental planning and layout algorithms, space requirements for facilities, and receiving and shipping principles. The course also covers the engineering techniques used for determining the best location of a brand new facility.

Corequisites: Take IER 310;
Offered: Every year, Fall

IER 360. Operations Planning and Control.3 Credits.

This course focuses on analytical techniques for work scheduling and materials planning in the manufacturing, service and health care industries. The main objective is to develop the ability to use engineering tools for industrial engineering practice in operations and materials management. Topics include forecasting, production and material planning (JIT, MRP, ERP), inventory analysis and scheduling techniques.

Prerequisites: Take MA 285;
Offered: Every year, Fall

IER 385. Decision Analysis.3 Credits.

The course presents basic techniques of decision making concentrating on both theoretical and modeling aspects. This course integrates the art and science of decision making for single and multiple objective environments to support the decision-making phase of the Systems Decision Process (SDP). The focus of the course is modeling problem structure, uncertainty, risk and preference in the context of decision making.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 110 CSC 110L;
Offered: Every year, Spring

IER 410. Designing and Managing the Supply Chain.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the techniques of supply chain management, focusing on logistics, purchasing and product development processes. The main objective is develop competence in quantitative methods for analyzing and solving supply chain problems in a variety of industries that include manufacturing, services and health care. Topics include supply chain performance, network design, product availability and sustainable supply chain management.

Prerequisites: Take IER 360;
Offered: As needed

IER 415. Design of Experiments.3 Credits.

This course deals with the design of experiments, the application of variance, regression analysis, and related statistical methods. Students learn how to plan, design and conduct experiments efficiently and effectively and learn how to analyze the resulting data to obtain objective conclusions. Experimental design and analysis are investigated.

Prerequisites: Take MA 285;
Offered: As needed

IER 420. Industrial Control Systems.3 Credits.

Students explore classical control systems through modern control methods based on state variable models, feedback models, controllers and full-state observers. Students gain experience in computer-aided design and analysis using Matlab.

Prerequisites: Take IER 320;
Offered: As needed

IER 430. Statistical Process Control.3 Credits.

The main focus in this course is to understand and implement the Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control (DMAIC) approach in Six Sigma. Therefore, defining a problem for improvement of a process and using data-driven measuring, analysis, improvement and controlling techniques to solve the defined problem are the essentials of this course. Topics include quality improvement philosophies, modeling process quality, statistical process control, control charts for variables and attributes, single- and multivariable regression analysis of data sets, sampling strategies, economic design of charts, use of statistical distributions for data analysis and process capability.

Prerequisites: Take MA 285;
Offered: Every year, Fall

IER 440. Simulation.3 Credits.

This course includes a simulation of complex systems with applications in industrial engineering. Topics include modeling and developing custom solutions in one or more high-level computer packages; input distribution modeling; emphasizing examples, applications and cases.

Prerequisites: Take MA 285;
Offered: Every year, Spring

IER 450. Health Care Systems Engineering.3 Credits.

This course introduces students to health care organizations, including hospitals, clinics, multihospital systems and other facilities as an integrated delivery system. By emphasizing practical application of diverse operations involved in such a system, various quantitative modeling and optimization techniques are discussed and applied to solve problems.

Prerequisites: Take IER 335;
Offered: Every year, Spring

IER 465. Cognitive Human Factors and the Workplace.2 Credits.

This course analyzes the impacts of the cognitive factors of the human decision makers on workflow and efficiency. Basic concepts of cognition, as well as sensory systems, such as visual and auditory, are introduced, leading to the analysis of design topics, including displays, controls, shiftwork and work-rest schedules. Special emphasis is placed on the capabilities and limitations of humans, in human-centered design of systems and products. Sophomore status required.

Offered: Every year, Fall

IER 475. Human Reliability.1 Credit.

This course focuses on the principles, methods and tools for the analysis, design and evaluation of human decision making within human-centered systems. The impacts of human perceptual and cognitive factors are analyzed, leading to design principles for error-prevention. This course is complementary to IER 465, Cognitive Human Factors and the Workplace. Sophomore status required.

Offered: Every year, Fall

IER 485. System Reliability.2 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to failure rates, failure risk analysis and system configurations, such as series, parallel and redundant systems. It also discusses design for reliability and optimal maintenance and replacement policies.

Prerequisites: Take MA 285 MA 142 or MA 152;
Offered: Every year, Fall

IER 489. Advanced Independent Study in IE.1-6 Credits.

This is a tutorial course or an individual project in which the student pursues advanced study in systems engineering or engineering management. The scope of the course is tailored to the desires of the student in consultation with a faculty adviser. Communication skills are developed with both written reports and oral presentations. Requires approval of faculty member.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

IER 490. Engineering Professional Experience.1 Credit.

Students gain at least 240 hours of experience by employing industrial engineering skills in a professional setting. Students must obtain departmental approval and register prior to starting the experience. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of adviser.

Prerequisites: Take ENR 395;
Offered: Every year, All

IER 491. Capstone Project I.3 Credits.

This is the first part of a two-semester capstone design experience for senior industrial engineering students. Students apply knowledge gained throughout the curriculum to a significant project. Furthermore, this course aims to strengthen the students' oral and written communication skills as well as teamwork and conflict resolution. Students work in teams to formulate issues and collect data at an external organization before beginning to perform analysis and propose solutions in the subsequent course--IER 498.

Prerequisites: Take IER 320 IER 330 IER 335 IER 340 IER 430 IER 465;
Corequisites: Take IER 360;
Offered: Every year, Fall

IER 498. Capstone Project II.3 Credits.

This is the second part of a two-semester capstone design experience for industrial engineering students. The purpose of a capstone project is to give senior students the opportunity to apply knowledge gained throughout the curriculum to a significant project. After formulating the problem and commencing data collection in IER 491, the student teams continue their project in IER 498 by completing data collection, performing analysis and modeling, and finally recommending solutions to help address the client issue(s).

Prerequisites: Take IER 310 IER 491;
Offered: Every year, Spring

Mechanical Engineering (MER)

MER 210. Fundamentals of Engineering Mechanics and Design.3 Credits.

This course and lab provide a foundation in the principles of statics and mechanics of materials. It introduces the engineering design process, which serves as a foundation for further engineering studies. Equilibrium principles are used to analyze forces on statically determinate rigid bodies and structures. Concepts of stress and strain are introduced under axial loading.

Corequisites: Take MA 241 or MA 152 and PHY 121;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 210L. Fundamentals of Engineering Mechanics and Design Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 210.

Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 220. Mechanics of Materials.3 Credits.

Students study the behavior of materials under normal, shear, torsional, bending and combined loads. Loading, geometry, functional environment and material properties of machine or structural parts are used to relate the forces applied to a body to resulting internal forces and deformations in order to evaluate performance. Practical applications involving the design of mechanical and structural elements under various loading and environmental conditions are emphasized.

Prerequisites: Take MER 210;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 220L. Mechanics of Materials Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 220.

Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 221. Dynamics.3 Credits.

Dynamics examines the motion of particles, systems of particles and rigid bodies under the influence of forces. It focuses on the use of Newton's Second Law, in three major, progressive blocks of instruction from scalar, then vector, treatments of rectilinear and curvilinear motion of single particles; through vector motion of systems of particles; to general three-dimensional motion of rigid bodies. The course also provides brief introductions to energy methods: work-energy and impulse-momentum. Students apply the laws of physics to analyze problems and obtain a solid understanding of the relationship between force and acceleration in a dynamic environment.

Prerequisites: Take MER 210;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 230. Engineering Materials.3 Credits.

This course explores the relationship between the microscopic structure and macroscopic properties of materials used in engineering applications. The origin of mechanical and physical properties is studied. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of the fundamental aspects of atomic and microstructural concepts for proper materials selection and enhancement of engineering properties. Materials studied are metals, ceramics, polymers and composites.

Prerequisites: Take MER 220 CHE 110;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 230L. Engineering Materials Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 230.

Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 250. Computer Aided Design.3 Credits.

Students explore the use of computer methods as an aid to solving engineering problems. Computer techniques are studied in a variety of engineering contexts. Topics include 3D solid modeling, engineering analysis, engineering computer programming and graphical presentation of information. Students learn to apply a variety of engineering-related programs or routines. Students write, document and use programs of their own in design scenarios. Considerable emphasis is placed on use of the computer as a tool in the engineering design process.

Prerequisites: Take MA142 or MA 152;
Corequisites: Take MA 229 or CSC 110;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 310. Thermal-Fluid Systems I.3 Credits.

This course focuses on fluid mechanics while introducing and integrating corresponding topics of thermodynamics. Properties of fluids and hydrostatics as well as conservation principles for mass, energy and linear momentum are covered. Principles are applied to incompressible flow in pipes, external flows, Bernoulli's equation, dimensional analysis, Navier-Stokes, boundary layer development, lift and drag. Laboratory exercises are incorporated into classroom work.

Prerequisites: Take MA 242 or 251 and PHY 121;
Corequisites: Take MA 365 or MA 265;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 320. Thermal-Fluid Systems II.3 Credits.

This course focuses on thermodynamics, while incorporating and building upon fluid mechanics topics covered in MER 310. It applies conservation principles for mass, energy and linear momentum as well as the second law of thermodynamics. Principles are applied to power generation systems, refrigeration cycles and total air conditioning. Thermodynamic principles also are applied to the automotive system to examine engine performance (Otto and Diesel cycles) and to high performance aircraft to examine the Brayton cycle. Laboratory exercises are incorporated into classroom work. This class includes completion of a comprehensive, out-of-class design and analysis project.

Prerequisites: Take CHE 110 MER 310;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 330. Introduction to Circuits.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to DC circuit analysis, DC circuit design and AC circuit analysis. The course also includes electrical engineering topics required to prepare students for the Fundamentals of Engineering examination as a part of professional licensure. Students learn the language, tools and problem-solving techniques used in basic electrical circuit analysis.

Prerequisites: Take MA 241 or MA 251;
Corequisites: Take PHY 122;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 330L. Circuits Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 330.

Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 340. Manufacturing/Machine Component Design.3 Credits.

This course introduces machine component design and manufacturing machines, relating fundamental engineering science to machine components. It covers load, stress and strain analyses and fatigue. The course progresses to the study of machine component design to include mechanical components such as linkages, fasteners, springs, bearings, gears and shafts. The course culminates in team-oriented design and manufacture of a mechanical engineering product using the techniques, tools, machines and equipment that were developed and taught throughout the course and its associated lab (MER 340L).

Prerequisites: Take MER 220 MER 221;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 340L. Manufacturing/Machine Component Design Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 340. Students gain a safe, hands-on experience with manufacturing machines and equipment. They work on mechanical manufacturing machines common in machine shop and production environments. The equipment includes: a mill, lathe, grinder, drill press and bandsaw.

Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 350. Mechanical Engineering Design.3 Credits.

This course introduces mechanical engineering design as an interactive decision-making process. An engineering design problem reinforces the design process instruction and culminates in a student competition. Students begin their major design experience project, applying the mechanical engineering design process to a real-world engineering problem addressing social, political, economic and technical issues. Students continue their project with MER 498.

Prerequisites: Take MER 250 MER 340;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 360. Heat Transfer.3 Credits.

The three modes of heat transfer--conduction, convection and radiation--are studied in detail, and these concepts are applied to analyze various engineering systems. The principles of conduction and convection are applied to the analysis and design of heat exchangers, and all three modes of heat transfer are applied together to study scenarios of multi-mode heat transfer.

Prerequisites: Take MER 320;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 387. Introduction to Applied Aerodynamics.3 Credits.

The fundamental laws of fluid mechanics are used to develop the characteristic forces and moments, generated by the flow about aerodynamic bodies. Lift, drag and aerodynamic moments are studied for airfoils (2D) and finite wings (3D) in the subsonic and flow regime. Aircraft performance and design parameters are developed in both the classroom and laboratory sessions. The laboratory sessions include low-speed wind tunnel testing.

Prerequisites: Take MER 221 MER 310;
Corequisites: Take MER 320
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 388. Helicopter Aeronautics.3 Credits.

This course examines the aerodynamics of helicopter flight in relation to hover, translating and partial power flight. Theory and experimental results are used to predict aircraft performance. The course analyzes the dynamic response of the rotor system and the performance aspects of the vehicle as a whole. This is followed by a design workshop, during which students complete the initial sizing of a helicopter to meet specific mission requirements. The course includes a laboratory examining rotor power and thrust utilizing a whirl stand apparatus, and one field trip to a commercial helicopter company.

Prerequisites: Take MER 210 MER 250 MER 310;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 400. Mechanical Measurement and Data Acquisition.3 Credits.

In this course, students learn how to perform computer-based measurements of various mechanical phenomena such as displacement, temperature, force, strain, torque, pressure, flow, vibration and acceleration. This is a hands-on course that starts with the basics of sensors and transducers, and walks the students through signal conditioning electronics, instrumentation, data acquisition and signal analysis. A significant portion of this course focuses on LabView, an industry-standard graphical programming language that is widely used for data acquisition and analysis.

Prerequisites: Take MER 330 CSC 110 CSC 110L;
Offered: As needed

MER 450. Environmentally Conscious Design and Manufacturing.3 Credits.

Students learn to identify, quantify and reduce environmental impacts caused by products. Impact reduction methods form the course's core subject matter. Such methods include: design for recycling, design for remanufacture, life cycle assessment, pollution prevention biomimetics and others. The course also provides an overview of motivational legislation from North America and Europe such as the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) and the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) directive. Through lecture, discussion, assignments, case studies and potentially a semester project, students achieve a critical understanding of the role environmental issues play in mechanical engineering.

Prerequisites: Take MER 340;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 460. Mechanical Measurement and Data Acquisition.3 Credits.

In this course, students learn how to perform computer-based measurements of various mechanical phenomena such as displacement, temperature, force, strain, torque, pressure, flow, vibration and acceleration. This is a hands-on course that starts with the basics of sensors and transducers, and walks the students through signal conditioning electronics, instrumentation, data acquisition and signal analysis. A significant portion of this course focuses on LabVIEW, an industry-standard graphical programming language that is widely used for data acquisition and analysis.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 110 CSC 110L MER 330 MER 330L;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 470. Dynamic Modeling and Control.3 Credits.

This course covers dynamic modeling and control of linear systems. It includes an overview of classical control theory as the foundation for control applications in mechanical, electrical and aeronautical systems. Mathematical models are developed for various physical systems, and represented in time-domain, Laplace domain and state-space. Control system analysis and design techniques are studied within the context of transient and steady-state response. Computer design exercises include dynamic modeling and control of various engineering systems. Laboratory exercises include hands-on implementation of sensors and actuators, experimental validation of simulated models, feedback design and control-system implementation.

Prerequisites: Take MER 221 MER 250 MER 330 and MA 265 or MA 365;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 470L. Dynamic Modeling and Controls Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 470.

Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 472. Energy Conversion Systems.3 Credits.

This course provides an overview and examines the historical evolution of both classical and state-of-the-art energy conversion technology. It includes advanced analysis of energy conversion hardware, air conditioning and refrigeration as well as fossil fuel combustion processes using concepts of energy. Major methods of direct energy conversion are covered, including thermoelectricity, photovoltaics, thermionics, magnetohydrodynamics, and fuel cells. The current state of national and world energy is presented, and alternatives including renewable energy and a hydrogen economy are explored with reference to economic, political, environmental and technological factors.

Prerequisites: Take MER 330;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 475. Mechatronics.3 Credits.

This course presents a comprehensive introduction to the field of mechatronics. Mechatronics is the crossroads in engineering where mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, computer science and controls engineering meet to create new and exciting real-world systems. Knowledge of mechanical and electrical components, controls theory and design are integrated to solve actual physical design applications.

Prerequisites: Take MER 470;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 475L. Mechatronics Lab.1 Credit.

Lab to accompany MER 475.

Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 481. Aircraft Performance/Static Stability.3 Credits.

The course applies the principles developed in applied aerodynamics to develop the equations of motion for a rigid aircraft in steady state level flight, maneuvering flight, and during takeoff and landing. These equations are analyzed to determine such performance characteristics as maximum range, endurance, turning rate, climb rate, etc. Piston-prop, turbo-prop and jet aircraft are considered. The equations of motion are then analyzed to develop static stability criteria and investigate steady state control characteristics.

Prerequisites: Take MER 330 MER 387;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 486. Vibration Engineering.3 Credits.

In this course, students develop a foundation in the analysis and design of free and forced single and multidegree-of-freedom systems. Applications include modeling, damping, resonance, force transmissibility, vibration absorbers, matrix formulation and modal analysis. Emphasis is placed on vibrations examples from several engineering fields. Out-of-class design problems provide students with the opportunity to apply principles taught in the classroom to realistic problems encountered by practicing engineers. In-class demonstrations supplement the theory development.

Prerequisites: Take MER 221;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 489. Advanced Study in Mechanical Engineering.3 Credits.

The student pursues advanced study of a topic in mechanical engineering on an individual or small-group basis, independent of a formal classroom setting. Similar to graduate level research, the scope of the selected project is tailored to the interests of the student, based on resources and in consultation with a faculty adviser. To develop research skills, the student is integral in all phases of project completion by defining objectives, studying fundamentals and background material, outlining the approach, conducting analysis and communicating results. Requires permission of the instructor.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

MER 490. Engineering Professional Experience.1 Credit.

Students gain experience by employing engineering skills in a professional setting under the guidance of practicing engineers. Students must obtain departmental approval and register prior to starting the experience. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of adviser.

Prerequisites: Take ENR 395;
Offered: Every year, All

MER 491. Biomedical Engineering.3 Credits.

In this introductory course to biomedical engineering, students analyze biomedical implantable devices and explore topics such as biocompatibility, biomechanical properties of biological tissue, device design, as well as factors that go into medical device development and testing. Hands-on labs are incorporated into the course to provide a more in-depth immersion into specific course topics.

Prerequisites: Take MER 220;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 492. Power Trains and Vehicle Dynamics.3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction in ground vehicle theory with emphasis on analysis, testing and evaluation of automotive power trains and dynamic systems to understand the underlying principles affecting vehicle design. Clutches, transmissions (manual and automatic), differentials, wheels and tires, as well as braking, steering and suspension systems are studied in detail to include their effect on vehicular or other system performance. High-speed, tracked vehicle application of the above systems also is covered. Theory is verified with hands-on experience in the laboratory. Component design problems are interspersed throughout the course.

Prerequisites: Take MER 221 MER 320;
Offered: Every year, Fall

MER 498. ME Major Design Experience.3 Credits.

This course integrates math, science and engineering principles using a comprehensive engineering design project. Open-ended, client-based design problems emphasize a multidisciplinary approach to total system design. Design teams develop product specifications, generate alternatives, make practical engineering approximations, perform appropriate analysis to support technical feasibility, and make decisions leading to designs that meet stated requirements. System integration, computer-aided design, maintainability and fabrication techniques are addressed.

Prerequisites: Take MER 350;
Offered: Every year, Spring

MER 499. Senior Design Project II.3 Credits.

A two-semester, six credit capstone design experience for mechanical engineering students involving analysis and synthesis of unstructured problems in practical settings. Students work in teams to formulate issues, propose solutions, and communicate results in formal written and oral presentations.

Prerequisites: Take MER 340;
Offered: Every year, Spring

Software Engineering (SER)

SER 120. Object-Oriented Design and Programming.3 Credits.

This course serves as an introduction to the principles of design and development using object-oriented techniques such as inheritance, polymorphism and encapsulation. Students apply OO techniques to develop event-driven programs. Code craftsmanship is emphasized. Students also learn to apply and recognize design patterns for OO software and to use standard application development frameworks.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 110 CSC 110L with a grade of C- or higher;
Corequisites: Take SER 120L;
Offered: Every year, Spring

SER 120L. Object-Oriented Design and Programming Lab.1 Credit.

Students gain experience in object-oriented programming and design by completing a series of activities, covering a range of topics from the Object-Oriented Design and Programming course (SER 120). This course is taken in conjunction with SER 120.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 110 CSC 110L; Minimum grade C-;
Corequisites: Take SER 120;
Offered: Every year, Spring

SER 210. Software Engineering Design and Development.3 Credits.

This course serves as an introduction to software engineering using object-oriented analysis and design. The course emphasizes the development of robust and high-quality software systems based on object-oriented principles. Implementations are performed using state-of-the-art programming languages and application development frameworks.

Prerequisites: Take SER 120 SER 120L SER 225 with a grade of C- or higher
Offered: Every year, Spring

SER 225. Introduction to Software Development (CSC 225).3 Credits.

This course presents introductory software development concepts including group development, large-scale project work and theoretical aspects of object-oriented programming. The course expands on material from previous courses. Professional behavior and ethics represent an important component of this course.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 111 CSC 111L; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every year, Fall

SER 305. Advanced Computational Problem Solving.3 Credits.

This course presents computational problem solving and advanced algorithmic thinking techniques. It expands on material from previous courses. Students also learn about advanced APIs and software development frameworks, including APIs for advanced collections and concurrent programming, and gain additional experience with frameworks for testing and building software systems.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 215 SER 120 SER 120L; Minimum grade C-
Offered: Every year, Fall

SER 310. Human-Computer Interaction.3 Credits.

This course addresses concepts in human-computer interaction (HCI). Students learn about interaction design, information visualization, and usability. The course covers cognitive aspects of HCI and methods for evaluating user interfaces.

Prerequisites: Take SER 210; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every year, Spring

SER 320. Software Design and Architecture.3 Credits.

Students explore software design methodologies, architectural styles, design principles and design techniques. The course examines the principles and methods of architectural design and detailed design of complex, large-scale software systems and covers a number of architectural styles including classical and emerging styles.

Prerequisites: Take SER 210; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every year, Fall

SER 325. Databases (CSC 325).3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the theory and application of database systems. Topics include data modeling and the relational model, query languages, relational database design, transaction processing, databases and physical database design.

Prerequisites: Take CSC 215 CSC 225; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every other year, Spring

SER 330. Software Quality Assurance.3 Credits.

This course acquaints students with various aspects of software quality assurance. Students learn about dynamic analysis approaches, such as testing and runtime assertions, static analysis approaches, such as reviews and finite-state verification, and processes for promoting software quality. Emphasis is placed on testing, including testing processes, such as unit, integration, system, acceptance and regression testing, and test case selection techniques, such as black-box and white-box testing. The relationship between ethics and software quality assurance is explored.

Prerequisites: Take SER 210; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every year, Spring

SER 340. Software Requirements Analysis.3 Credits.

This course covers basic concepts and principles of software requirements engineering including techniques, processes and tools for specifying software requirements. Topics include requirements elicitation, requirements management, functional and nonfunctional requirements, semiformal and formal approaches, Agile requirement analysis and requirements tracking.

Prerequisites: Take SER 210; Minimum Grade C-;
Offered: Every year, Fall

SER 350. Software Project Management.3 Credits.

This course acquaints students with various aspects of software project management. Students learn about project initiation and scope definition; project planning, enactment and closure; measuring and controlling software artifacts and processes; risk management; and human aspects of software project management. Students use various tools for software project management and obtain hands-on experience by acting as managers of an ongoing software project.

Prerequisites: Take SER 330 SER 340; Minimum Grade C-;
Offered: Every year, Fall

SER 360. Software Engineering in Health Care.3 Credits.

Biomedical informatics is one of the fastest growing economic sectors in the world. Software, and thus software engineering, has an important role in biomedical informatics. Students in this course explore the applicability of software engineering techniques to health care. Topics include electronic health records; modeling and analysis of medical processes with the goal of improving safety and efficiency; software solutions for providing clinical decision support; and bioinformatics.

Prerequisites: Take SER 210; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every other year, Fall

SER 375. Advanced Topics in Software Engineering.3 Credits.

Software engineering is a rapidly evolving discipline. This course explores advanced software engineering topics that are not covered in any current software engineering course, or expands on topics currently offered in the catalog. A specific course's focus may be interdisciplinary.

Prerequisites: Take SER 210; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: As needed

SER 399. Independent Study.3 Credits.

Independent study courses are individual examinations of topics within the discipline not covered by conventional courses. Students who wish to engage in independent study must work with a departmental faculty. Students and faculty must agree on a topic, structure and meeting schedule.

Offered: As needed

SER 489. Advanced Independent Study in Software Engine.3 Credits.

This is a tutorial course or an individual project in which the student pursues advanced study in software engineering. The scope of the course is tailored to the desires of the student in consultation with a faculty adviser. Communication skills are developed through written reports and oral presentations. Requires approval of faculty member.

Offered: As needed

SER 490. Engineering Professional Experience.1 Credit.

Students gain practical experience in applying theory obtained in previous course experiences by employing engineering skills in a professional setting under the guidance of faculty and mentors. Students must obtain departmental approval and register prior to starting the experience. If approved, an internship could satisfy this requirement. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of adviser.

Prerequisites: Take ENR 395; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every year, All

SER 491. Senior Capstone I.3 Credits.

This is the first part of a two-semester, capstone design experience for software engineering students. It involves analysis and synthesis of unstructured problems in practical settings. Students work in teams to formulate issues, propose solutions and communicate results in formal written and oral presentations

Prerequisites: Take SER 340; Grade of C-;
Offered: Every year, Fall

SER 492. Senior Capstone II.3 Credits.

This is the second part of a two-semester, capstone design experience for software engineering students. Students work in teams to refine software artifacts developed in SER 491 and produce a prototype of a software system. Results are communicated in formal written and oral presentations.

Prerequisites: Take SER 491; Minimum grade C-;
Offered: Every year, Spring