Dual-Degree BS in Health Science Studies/Master of Occupational Therapy

Program Contact: Sal Bondoc 203-582-3727

Our five-and-a-half-year, entry-level, Dual-Degree Bachelor of Science/Master of Occupational Therapy program prepares students with a breadth and depth of knowledge and skills to practice autonomously or collaboratively at entry-level, within various health care, educational and social systems. Our curriculum consists of three overlapping tiers: University Curriculum, professional component and fieldwork. Upon successful completion of the fourth year, the BS in Health Science Studies is awarded. 

  • Tier 1: University Curriculum. During the first two years, students take most of their University Curriculum (UC) courses. Concurrently, students take prerequisite science courses for the OT program (PHY 101+ PHY 101L, BIO 211 + BIO 211L, BIO 212 + BIO 212L, and MA 275) as well as OT foundational courses (OT 101, OT 201, OT 214, and OT 250). Prior to entry in the junior year, students must satisfy the following requirements: acquire a grade of B- or better in 100- and 200-level OT courses; satisfactorily complete a minimum of 40 credits of the University Curriculum; achieve a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or better; and achieve a science prerequisite GPA of 2.75 or better.

    It is highly recommended that students take all prerequisite science courses at Quinnipiac University. If a student is granted permission to take a science course at another four-year institution, the science grade will be factored into the required science GPA of 2.75. Failure to meet the cumulative GPA of 3.0 with Quinnipiac University courses only or the science prerequisite GPA of 2.75 by the end of the sophomore year will result in dismissal from the program.
     
  • Tier 2: Professional Component. The professional component of the program consists of all occupational therapy courses from the junior, senior and graduate years. Upon entry into the professional component, students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 each semester in the occupational therapy courses. To progress through the program, students must meet the minimum GPA of 3.0 and must earn a grade of C+ or above in all didactic courses and B+ or above in all fieldwork level I courses.

  • Tier 3: Fieldwork Component. All fieldwork level II experiences (OT 501FOT 580 and/or OT 581) must be completed with a “P” (pass) to graduate.

Fieldwork Requirements

All students are responsible for transportation to all fieldwork experiences. All students are required to maintain a viable health insurance, malpractice insurance, CPR certification and current immunization record according to their fieldwork placements. A fieldwork site may have additional requirements as part of its affiliation agreement such as background checks and site-specific mandatory in-services. Failure to comply with fieldwork requirements may negatively impact a student's ability to participate in fieldwork. The department also requires current membership with the American Occupational Therapy Association.

Accreditation

The Quinnipiac Dual-Degree BS/MOT program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). The ACOTE address is:

c/o Accreditation Department
American Occupational Therapy Association
4720 Montgomery Lane, Ste. 200
Bethesda, MD 20814-3449
Phone: 301-652-6611 (ext. 2914)
Fax: 301-652-1417
Email: accred@aota.org
Website: acoteonline.org

Program Sponsorship

Quinnipiac University assumes primary responsibility for appointment of faculty, admission of students, and curriculum planning for the Dual-Degree BS/MOT program. This responsibility includes the delivery of course content, satisfactory completion of the educational program, and granting of the degree. The university also is responsible for the coordination of classroom teaching and supervised fieldwork practice and for providing assurance that the practice activities assigned to students in a fieldwork setting are appropriate to the program.

Quinnipiac University complies with the administrative requirements for maintaining accreditation of the Dual-Degree BS/MOT program.

Dual-Degree BS/MOT Curriculum

The curriculum for the professional courses in the program are reviewed regularly and are subject to modification in both content and credit as deemed necessary to maintain a high-quality educational experience and keep current with best practices in the profession.

Plan of Study Grid
First Year
Fall SemesterCredits
BIO 101
101L
General Biology I
and General Biology I Lab
4
EN 101 Introduction to Academic Reading and Writing 3
FYS 101 First-Year Seminar 3
OT 101 Foundations of Occupational Therapy 2
UC Course 1 3
 Credits15
Spring Semester
BIO 102
102L
General Biology II
and General Biology Lab II
4
EN 102 Academic Writing and Research 3
MA 275 Biostatistics 3
OT 214 Professionalism in Occupational Therapy 2
UC Course 2 3
 Credits15
Second Year
Fall Semester
BIO 211
211L
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
and Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab I
4
PHY 101
101L
Elements of Physics
and Elements of Physics Lab
4
OT 201 Occupation, Health, Participation 2
UC Course 3 3
UC Course 4 3
 Credits16
Spring Semester
BIO 212
212L
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
and Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
4
OT 250 Occupational Therapy Framework and Activity Analysis 3
UC Course 5 3
UC Course 6 3
UC Course 7 3
 Credits16
Third Year
Fall Semester
OT 322
322L
Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology I
and Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab I
4
OT 325 Principles Human Development and Occupation 3
OT 333
333L
Functional Neuroscience I
and Functional Neuroscience I Lab
4
OT 350 Theoretical Models and Service Learning 2
UC Course 8 3
 Credits16
Spring Semester
OT 314 Therapeutic Relationships and Use of Self 2
OT 323
323L
Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology II
and Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab II
4
OT 326 Principles of Human Development/Older Adults 3
OT 334 Functional Neuroscience II 2
OT 356F Documenting OT Practice Fieldwork 1
OT 362 Documenting Occupational Therapy Practice 1
QU 420 Integrative Capstone 3
 Credits16
Fourth Year
Fall Semester
OT 411
411L
Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy I
and Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy I Lab
4
OT 431 Barriers to Health, Occupation and Participation in Children and Youth Populations 4
OT 451
451L
Occupational Therapy Process in Children and Youth
and Occupational Therapy Process in Children and Youth Lab
7
OT 451F Occupational Therapy Process in Children and Youth Fieldwork 1
 Credits16
Spring Semester
OT 412
412L
Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy II
and Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy Lab II
4
OT 432 Barriers to Health, Occupation and Participation in Adults/Older Adults 4
OT 452
452L
Occupational Therapy Process in Adults and Older Adults
and Occupational Therapy Process in Adults and Older Adults Lab
7
OT 452F Occupational Therapy Process in Adult and Older Adult Fieldwork 1
 Credits16
 Total Credits126

Upon successful completion of the fourth year, the BS in Health Science Studies is awarded. Award of this degree leads to matriculation into the graduate level of the program. Completion of all of the requirements for the BS degree are required to move to 500-level fieldwork and courses.

Summer Between Fourth & Graduate Year

Plan of Study Grid
Fourth Year
Summer SemesterCredits
OT 501F Immersive Fieldwork Experience in Psychosocial and Mental Health Practice (Fieldwork IIa) 1 3
OT 501S Fieldwork Seminar 1
OT 502 Pharmacology in Occupational Therapy Practice 2
 Credits6
 Total Credits6
Plan of Study Grid
Fifth Year
Fall SemesterCredits
Graduate Year:  
OT 511 Administration and Management in Occupational Therapy 4
OT 522L Biomechanical Interventions in Occupational Therapy 2
OT 531
531L
Sensory Processing and Integration
and Sensory Processing and Integration Lab
4
OT 531F Sensory Processing and Integration Fieldwork 1
OT 541 Assistive Technology in Occupational Therapy 2
OT 541L Assistive Technology in Occupational Therapy Lab 1
OT 550 OT Research Methods 4
 Credits18
Spring Semester
Graduate Year:  
OT 532
532L
Neurorehabilitation in Occupational Therapy
and Neurorehabilitation in Occupational Therapy Lab
4
OT 532F Neurorehabilitation in Occupational Therapy Practice Fieldwork 1
OT 540 Special Topics in Occupational Therapy 3
OT 542 Work and Ergonomics 3
OT 556 Professional Development 3
OT 570 Capstone Graduate Projects 3
 Credits17
Summer Semester
Following Graduate Year:  
OT 580 Fieldwork Level IIb 2 6
 Credits6
Sixth Year
Fall Semester
(Following Graduate Year)  
OT 581 Fieldwork Level IIa 2 6
 Credits6
 Total Credits47

Progression, Retention and Graduation Requirements

All policies and procedures regarding progression, retention and graduation are found in the OT Student Manual. These policies and procedures are routinely reviewed with the students at the beginning of each semester and/or during advising.

University Curriculum and OT Prerequisite Phase

Prior to entry in the junior year, students must satisfy the following requirements:

  • complete a minimum of 40 credits of the University Curriculum, all OT prerequisites and all OT foundational courses with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0;
  • all foundational OT courses must be at a grade of B- or better; and
  • achieve a minimum science GPA of 2.75. Courses that are considered in the science GPA are BIO 101 +BIO 101L, BIO 102 + BIO 102L and all the OT prerequisites

Professional Component and Fieldwork Phases

To progress through the program, students must meet the minimum semester GPA of 3.0 and must earn a grade of C+ or above in all didactic courses and B+ or above in all fieldwork level I courses. In addition, all students must acquire a “Pass” in their fieldwork level II. Failing to meet the aforementioned requirements will result in a referral to the Occupational Therapy Progression and Retention Committee (PRC). The outcome of such referral may be: program probation with course remediation; a program probation with a course repeat (and repay); or a program dismissal.

All courses must be taken sequentially as indicated in the program of study. Students may request in writing to the department chairperson, any deviations from the course sequence, waivers from occupational therapy courses, and/or transfer credits from other occupational therapy programs. All requests must be approved by the Occupational Therapy PRC and the department chairperson.

Successful completion of all didactic and fieldwork requirements is necessary for graduation with the degree of Master of Occupational Therapy.

Mission Statement

The Department of Occupational Therapy aims to provide high-quality education to develop occupational therapy practitioner-scholars, who possess broad-based knowledge and can influence meaningful change in the health and functioning of individuals, populations and communities.

Philosophy

The OT Department views the entry-level educational experience with a developmental-humanistic lens. This approach acknowledges that each student has unique experiences and possesses varying abilities, which are brought to the university environment and further developed through liberal and disciplinary inquiry as well as, co-curricular, community-based/experiential learning and professional experiences.

The department conceptualizes “development” not merely as a sequential ontological event but rather as a complex iterative, heterarchical and hierarchical sets of processes that are situated in various contexts. This developmental curriculum concept is reflected below using Fink's Taxonomy of Significant Learning:

  • Foundational Knowledge (and Caring and Learning to Learn) – refers to understanding, remembering information and ideas; developing interests and professional values; and developing the skills to learn or self-direct one’s learning
  • Application and Integration (and Learning about Oneself/Others) – refers to development of practical, creative and critical thinking skills by connecting ideas/concepts, events and realms of life; as well as developing a depth of awareness of oneself and of others
  • Application and Synthesis – refers to continued refinement of practical, creative and critical thinking skills through understanding of systems and embracing one’s agency

Through advising, mentorship and curricular experiences, the faculty applies a humanistic approach to support students in their personal and professional growth toward becoming an entry-level occupational therapist. Students are also taught the value and potential of every human being and their capacity to self-determine.

Program Learning Outcomes

In our Dual-Degree Bachelor of Science/Master of Occupational Therapy (BS/MOT) program, we prepare entry-level occupational therapist-generalists who are able to:

1.     advocate for the distinct value of the occupational therapy;

2.     apply occupation-centered principles and effective professional and clinical reasoning to complete the occupational therapy process;

3.     demonstrate competent performance of occupational therapy roles across traditional and emerging settings; 

4.     use evidence to inform practice;

5.     commit to the ongoing development of an OT professional identity; and

6.     articulate the integral relationship among occupation, health and participation.

Admission to the Program

The high school student applying for admission to the Occupational Therapy program should present four years of mathematics and four years of science. The general Quinnipiac University requirements for admissions must be met. All students applying for admission are strongly encouraged to have 10- 20 hours of observation in occupational therapy. The department is prepared to provide reasonable accommodations for students who have special needs or challenges.

Transfer Students

The Occupational Therapy Department has procedures in place for transfer admission into the Dual-Degree Bachelor of Science/Master of Occupational Therapy program. Information may be accessed upon request from the associate chair, Professor Roseanna Tufano (Roseanna.Tufano@qu.edu). 

Given the popularity of the program, acceptance into the BS/MOT program is on a space-available basis. When the number of qualified applicants exceed the number of available slots, prospective students will be ranked. The highest-ranking applicants will be given priority admission into the program.

The Quinnipiac Dual-Degree BS/MOT program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). The ACOTE address is:

c/o Accreditation Department
American Occupational Therapy Association
4720 Montgomery Lane, Ste. 200
Bethesda, MD 20814-3449
Phone: 301-652-6611 (ext. 2914)
Fax: 301-652-1417
Email: accred@aota.org
Website: acoteonline.org

Accreditation

The ACOTE awarded the program full accreditation status in August 2009. The accreditation review will be 2018-19. Graduates of the Dual-Degree BS/MOT program are eligible to sit for the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) certification exam to earn the credential, Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). Program outcomes in the NBCOT exam may be accessed through secure.nbcot.org/data/schoolstats.aspx. Most states require initial OTR certification to grant an individual a license to practice occupational therapy. A felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT certification exam or to attain state licensure.

Quinnipiac University complies with the administrative requirements for maintaining accreditation of the Dual-Degree BS/MOT program.

OT 101. Foundations of Occupational Therapy.2 Credits.

This course provides students with the foundations of occupational therapy practice including its philosophical and historical origins, as well as its core beliefs and principles. The course also presents the various occupational therapy practice settings - both traditional and emerging - and highlights how the foundations of OT practice are threaded across settings.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 201. Occupation, Health, Participation.2 Credits.

This course introduces the concept of occupation as central to the practice of occupational therapy. Emphasis is on the relationship between occupation and health. Using methods of inquiry, students gain a deeper understanding of occupational performance and its determinants from a person-centered to a population- and institution-centered perspective. Theoretical models focused on occupations are explored and applied to assessing and enhancing occupational performance.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 214. Professionalism in Occupational Therapy.2 Credits.

This preparatory course serves as a bridge from students' general education to the professional phase of the OT curriculum. Students explore two main features of contemporary occupational therapy practice - client-centeredness and evidence-based practice, as foundations to professionalism - as they integrate essential learning proficiencies in written and oral interpersonal communication, diversity awareness/cultural sensitivity, information literacy and critical thinking in the context of occupational therapy practice. Finally, the course helps students to internalize the values of professionalism and professional development as keys to being an effective change agent.

OT 250. Occupational Therapy Framework and Activity Analysis.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the domain and processes of occupational therapy. Emphasis is on the following processes: occupational profile and analysis of occupational performance; activity analysis; intervention planning; collaboration between practitioner and client; and collaboration within an interprofessional team. Students learn terminology associated with the occupational therapy domain and process and apply that knowledge to case analysis, self-analysis, video analysis and standardized patients/clients.

Offered: Every year, Spring and Summer

OT 314. Therapeutic Relationships and Use of Self.2 Credits.

This course builds upon students' understanding of intentional relationships, therapeutic use of self, and the OT process to develop leadership skills in the context of a therapeutic encounter. Concurrently, this course provides students with the foundation for the application of the group process as a means of intervention. The course involves didactic lectures and practical training on professional leadership skills for both dyadic as well as group relationships.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 322. Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology I.3 Credits.

This course is a comprehensive, two-part series designed to provide students with foundational expertise in human biomechanics. Students examine the musculoskeletal system in conjunction with principles of kinetics and kinematics as the basis of practice in physical rehabilitation. The course includes a corequisite laboratory to develop competency in basic biomechanical safety and assessment (goniometry and manual muscle testing). The series culminates by merging all aspects of human movement as the basis for engaging in everyday occupational activities.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 211 BIO 212 PHY 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 322L. Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab I.1 Credit.

This lab, which accompanies OT 322, provides the opportunity to learn in the Human Anatomy Lab, Clinical Skills Lab, Rehabilitation Science Lab and the Model Apartment as students develop proficiency with basic biomechanical safety and assessment (goniometry and manual muscle testing). This variety of laboratory settings serves to enhance content delivered in the classroom; students are guided to first visualize human anatomy via donor dissection and then apply that learning in the simulated clinical settings. Students are alternately scheduled among spaces weekly and in accordance with progression of region in the human body. (2 lab hrs.)

Prerequisites: Take BIO 211 BIO 212 PHY 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 323. Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology II.3 Credits.

This course is part two of a comprehensive series designed to provide students with foundational expertise in human biomechanics. Students continue their examination of the musculoskeletal system in conjunction with principles of kinetics and kinematics as the basis of practice in physical rehabilitation. The series culminates by merging all aspects of human movement as the basis for engaging in everyday occupational activities.

Prerequisites: Take OT 322.
Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 323L. Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab II.1 Credit.

This lab, which accompanies OT 323, provides an opportunity to learn in the Human Anatomy Lab, Clinical Skills Lab, Rehabilitation Science Lab and the Model Apartment as students develop proficiency with basic biomechanical safety and assessment (goniometry and manual muscle testing). This variety of laboratory settings enhances content delivered in the classroom. Students are guided to first visualize human anatomy via donor dissection and then apply that learning in the simulated clinical settings. Students are alternately scheduled among spaces weekly and in accordance with progression of region in the human body. (2 lab hrs.)

Prerequisites: Take OT 322L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 325. Principles Human Development and Occupation.3 Credits.

This course explores normal development and its impact on age appropriate occupations. The age span is from conception through early adulthood. The course provides a foundation for evaluation and intervention in human occupation.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 326. Principles of Human Development/Older Adults.3 Credits.

This course builds on the developmental concepts from OT 325 to explore normal development and its impact on age appropriate occupations. The age span is from early to late adulthood. The course provides a foundation for evaluation and intervention in human occupation as well as a foundation in performance patterns, skills and context.

Prerequisites: Take OT 325.
Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 333. Functional Neuroscience I.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive study of neuroanatomy including the structures, functions and physiology of neural systems that are key to normal human health and function. The course provides a strong foundation for future study on neural substrates of health conditions and occupational performance. The course also introduces basic screening procedures to identify neurobehavioral dysfunctions.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 333L. Functional Neuroscience I Lab.1 Credit.

This course supplements OT 333 Functional Neuroscience I lecture and provides a comprehensive study of neuroanatomy including the structures, functions and physiology of neural systems that are key to normal human health and function. The course also introduces basic screening procedures to identify neurobehavioral dysfunctions.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 334. Functional Neuroscience II.2 Credits.

This course builds on functional neuroanatomy as it examines the interrelationships of neuroanatomical structures, subsystems and neurophysiologic processes involved in human behaviors, which are the foundation for occupational performance. Specifically, students learn the neural substrates and mechanisms of motor behaviors, sensory-perception, language, attention, memory and learning. The course continues to introduce basic screening procedures to identify neurobehavioral dysfunctions.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 335. Functional Neuroanatomy.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive study of neuroanatomy including the structures, functions and physiology of neural systems key to normal human health and function. The course provides a strong foundation for future study on neural substrates of health conditions and occupational performance.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 336. Functional Neurobehavior.3 Credits.

This course builds on functional neuroanatomy as it examines the interrelationships of neuroanatomical structures, subsystems and neurophysiologic processes involved in human behaviors, which are the foundation for occupational performance. Specifically, students learn the neural substrates and mechanisms of motor behaviors, sensory-perception, emotions, language, attention, memory and learning. The course also introduces basic screening procedures to identify neurobehavioral dysfunctions.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 345. Theory, Occupation and Wellness.3 Credits.

This course highlights topics about health promotion and illness prevention for the theoretical application to occupational therapy practice. Foundational concepts from public health, behavioral and social science literature, and practice-based models help students to appreciate the role of occupational therapy in health and well-being.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 345S. Theory, Occupation and Wellness Seminar.1 Credit.

This integrative course highlights content from the OT 345 (lecture) and Service Learning lab experience (OT 355L). Using the Socratic teaching method, students actively discuss the role of occupational therapy in community practice, integrating learned content and professional experiences.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 350. Theoretical Models and Service Learning.2 Credits.

This course highlights occupational therapy models and theory development as the foundation for occupational participation and the promotion of health and well-being among clients and populations. Students directly participate in a community-based service-learning context to enhance experiential learning and the application of theoretical concepts to practice.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 355. The Occupational Therapy Framework.2 Credits.

This course focuses on the definitions, applications and synthesis of the terms occupation, activity and purposeful activity. The dimensions of occupation as they apply to work, self-care, care of others, leisure and education are explored through theory, simulation and real life. The Occupational Therapy Framework document is analyzed and applied to case studies and videotapes. Class discussions reflect on service learning and its relationship to occupation.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 355L. OT Community Experience Lab.1 Credit.

The OT Framework course has a 2 to 3 hour-per-week community experience component during which the student is able to observe and, as appropriate, apply the concepts of occupation and purposeful activity in a community-based service setting. The community experience is supervised by faculty with expertise in the analysis of community-based practice and the focus of learning activities for students to be engaged as active learners.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 356F. Documenting OT Practice Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This course provides structured fieldwork observation in various settings and allows the student to observe and explore the documentation process utilized in occupational therapy. Students also have the opportunity to read documentation, compare documentation to observations, and record data and anecdotal information, utilized within the various models such as health care, education, community and social systems. The settings utilized are equipped to provide clinical application of principles learned in the OT curriculum. Students have the opportunity to reflect on this experience within the lecture course and seminar component of this course. Fieldwork is two hours every other week with a seminar on alternate weeks.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 361. Group Dynamics.2 Credits.

This course builds upon students' understanding of intentional relationships and therapeutic use of self, and the OT process to develop group leadership skills in the context of a therapeutic encounter. Concurrently, this course provides students with the foundation for the application of the group process as a means of intervention. The course involves didactic lectures and practical training on group leadership skills.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 362. Documenting Occupational Therapy Practice.1 Credit.

This course provides an introduction to the philosophy, concepts and clinical reasoning that supports the documentation of occupational therapy practice. The course integrates ethical, legal and pragmatic considerations of documentation throughout the occupational therapy process in major practice settings. There is a simultaneous Level I Fieldwork/Seminar course that introduces students to requisite psychomotor and cognitive skills in documentation including reviewing client records, developing subjective and objective impressions from observations, and recording of data and anecdotal information.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 399. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Offered: As needed

OT 411. Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy I.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of OT's role for children and youth with mental health and psychosocial needs. Emphasis is on the role of occupation in promoting mental health, preventing disease and managing life disruptions. Psychological and OT theories guide the student's learning of the OT process within community-based and institutional settings across the continuum of service delivery. The inclusion of documentation, therapeutic use of self and evidence-based practice are emphasized.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 411L. Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy I Lab.1 Credit.

This lab course complements OT 411 Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy for Children and Youth. Students are provided with the opportunity to practice the application of evaluation and intervention process for various mental health conditions across the continuum of service delivery settings. Group theory and group interventions are highlighted. Related skills such as documentation, therapeutic use of self and therapeutic relationships are emphasized throughout this course.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 412. Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy II.3 Credits.

This integrative course provides a comprehensive overview of OT's role for adults with mental health and psychosocial needs. Emphasis is on the role of occupation in promoting mental health, preventing disease and managing life disruptions. Psychological and OT theories as well as group theory and group interventions are highlighted. Related skills such as documentation, therapeutic use of self and evidence-based practice are emphasized. A culminating group protocol demonstrates the student's clinical reasoning, application of theory and integration of best practice.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 412L. Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy Lab II.1 Credit.

This lab course complements OT 412 Mental Health and Psychosocial Occupational Therapy for Adults and Older Adults. Students are given the opportunity to practice the application of evaluation and intervention process for various mental health conditions across the continuum of service delivery settings. Group theory and group interventions are highlighted. Related skills such as documentation, therapeutic use of self and therapeutic relationships are emphasized throughout this course.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 431. Barriers to Health, Occupation and Participation in Children and Youth Populations.4 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive study of pediatric health conditions as they alter body structures and functions and impact activity and participation. Environmental factors and related facilitators and barriers to occupational performance are incorporated. This course also provides a clinical/professional reasoning model for structured case review and clinical decision-making and problem-solving.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 432. Barriers to Health, Occupation and Participation in Adults/Older Adults.4 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive study of various conditions that impact health and occupational performance among adults and older adult populations. Emphasis is given to understanding common diagnoses encountered by occupational therapists. This course also provides a clinical/professional reasoning model for structured case review with clinical decision-making and problem-solving.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 451. Occupational Therapy Process in Children and Youth.6 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the evaluation and intervention planning processes used in OT for children and youth. It covers specific procedures and tools for assessment, and strategies for intervention, which consider a variety of cultural and environmental factors. The emphasis is placed on theoretical underpinnings; the family and structural systems where children live, learn and play; clinical/professional reasoning; and documentation of the OT process in a variety of pediatric practice contexts.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 451F. Occupational Therapy Process in Children and Youth Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This course provides structured fieldwork observation in various settings working with the children and youth population; it allows the student to observe and explore the evaluation and treatment process utilized in occupational therapy. Students develop an appreciation for the frame of reference used in the models of practice as a guide to evaluation and treatment.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 451L. Occupational Therapy Process in Children and Youth Lab.1 Credit.

This course accompanies OT 451 OT Process Children & Youth Lecture & OT 451F OT Process Children and Youth Level I fieldwork. It provides a comprehensive overview of the evaluation process and intervention planning utilized in pediatric occupational therapy. This includes specific assessment tools and intervention strategies, which consider a variety of cultural and environmental factors.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 452. Occupational Therapy Process in Adults and Older Adults.6 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the evaluation process and intervention techniques used in occupational therapy for adults and older adults. While opportunities are provided to learn specific assessment tools and intervention techniques, emphasis is placed on the professional and clinical reasoning process and reflected on proper documentation of the processes. Application of theory, frames of reference, evidence and appreciation for diversity and systems are highlighted.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 452F. Occupational Therapy Process in Adult and Older Adult Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This course provides structured fieldwork observation in various settings working with the adult population; it allows students to observe and explore the evaluation and treatment process utilized in occupational therapy with adults and older adults. Students develop an appreciation for the frame of reference used in the models of practice as a guide to evaluation and treatment.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 452L. Occupational Therapy Process in Adults and Older Adults Lab.1 Credit.

This course complements OT 452 and OT 452F and provides an opportunity for experiential learning of the evaluation process and intervention techniques used in occupational therapy for adults and older adults. The safe, efficient and culturally sensitive delivery of specific assessment and intervention techniques are highlighted.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 499. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Offered: As needed

OT 501F. Immersive Fieldwork Experience in Psychosocial and Mental Health Practice (Fieldwork IIa).3 Credits.

This six- to seven-week fieldwork experience provides students with in-depth opportunities to integrate theory, research and best practice in psychosocial and/or mental health settings. The experience promotes clinical reasoning, reflective practice and professionalism while enhancing one's therapeutic use of self. Practice settings may include traditional mental health agencies, community-based programs and nontraditional sites that promote psychological and social factors for occupational engagement and well-being.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OT 501S. Fieldwork Seminar.1 Credit.

This course runs concurrently with the mental health/psychosocial summer experience and is delivered in an online format. It is designed to enhance professional and clinical reasoning while promoting the integration of theory to practice. Students are encouraged to critique the system of care as it relates to best practice for an identified population.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OT 502. Pharmacology in Occupational Therapy Practice.2 Credits.

This course addresses the pharmacokinetics, side effects and drug interactions of medications prescribed to clients who are commonly referred for occupational therapy services. The course emphasizes the role of the occupational therapist in medication management as a health maintenance activity and in monitoring the impact of drug therapy on the therapeutic process and occupational performance of clients.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OT 511. Administration and Management in Occupational Therapy.4 Credits.

This class introduces students to the daily management functions of an occupational therapy department including planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and supervision of occupational therapy assistants and other department personnel. The course integrates students' knowledge of interventions with information related to the delivery of occupational therapy services. Topics include managed care, quality assurance, leadership, regulatory agencies, models of practice, ethics, and consultation. Students gain hands-on experience with budgeting, marketing, program evaluation, and ethical problem-solving in administration.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 522L. Biomechanical Interventions in Occupational Therapy.2 Credits.

This lab provides students with "hands-on" learning experience and clinical reasoning in the safe and effective application of biomechanically-oriented interventions including physical agents and modalities, orthotic fitting and fabrication, and therapeutic exercise. Students also are introduced to prosthetics and the role of occupational therapy during pre-prosthetic and prosthetic training. Students apply clinical reasoning to identify the most appropriate biomechanical interventions based on the client's evaluation and socio-cultural factors to facilitate occupational performance. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 531. Sensory Processing and Integration.3 Credits.

This course provides an in-depth analysis of sensory processing and integration with a focus on clinical reasoning to understand and appreciate the impact of these processes on individuals, populations and community environments. Opportunities are provided to learn specific intervention strategies for individuals, as well a systems approach emphasizing the importance of educating the team of people who support these individuals in varying contexts, to facilitate functional participation and engagement in purposeful and productive activities. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 531F. Sensory Processing and Integration Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This structured fieldwork experience enables students to observe and analyze the impact of Ayres' Sensory Integration intervention. The settings utilized are equipped to provide clinical application of principles learned in the OT curriculum and shall be supervised by qualified personnel who specialize in sensory processing and integration. Prerequisite: Compliance with OT fieldwork requirements through MyRecordTracker.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 531L. Sensory Processing and Integration Lab.1 Credit.

This course provides practical experientials designed to assimilate sensory processing and integration concepts. Evaluation, direct intervention and collaboration strategies in traditional environments are emphasized. Additionally, application of sensory integrative concepts into currently relevant community-based contexts and systems are explored to facilitate functional participation and engagement in purposeful, context-specific activities. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 532. Neurorehabilitation in Occupational Therapy.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of specialized interventions used by occupational therapy practitioners in neurorehabilitation. This course integrates the use of various theoretical models/frames of reference, current evidence and clinical/professional reasoning pertinent to the OT process in neurorehabilitation practice. Key concepts in interprofessional practice and health literacy are incorporated. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 532F. Neurorehabilitation in Occupational Therapy Practice Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This course provides a structured fieldwork in neuro-rehabilitative settings and enables the student to observe, participate in, and document clinical encounters with clients undergoing OT evaluation and/or intervention. Students also have an opportunity to observe and/or engage in inter- and intra-professional collaboration, patient/client education and application of evidence-based practice. Emphasis is on applying theory into practice and the development of professional identity. Prerequisite: Compliance with OT fieldwork requirements per MyRecord Tracker.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 532L. Neurorehabilitation in Occupational Therapy Lab.1 Credit.

This course complements OT 532 Neurorehabilitation in OT Practice in providing a comprehensive overview of specialized interventions used by occupational therapy practitioners in neurorehabilitation. Students have the opportunity to apply methods and techniques according to various theoretical models/frames of reference and current evidence-based interventions. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 540. Special Topics in Occupational Therapy.1.5-3 Credits.

This course provides an opportunity for students to delve deeper into the specialized knowledge of the profession with evidence-based, occupation-centered practice as its core subject. Students further explore the specialized roles of the occupational therapist beyond that of a direct provider of skilled services, such as organizational/community leader, educator, case manager, entrepreneur and consultant at the systems level. In addition, students learn various modes of care delivery and systems of care including but not limited to tele-health, community building/development and train-the-trainer; they also evaluate the outcomes of such modes.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 541. Assistive Technology in Occupational Therapy.2 Credits.

This course provides students with exposure to advanced intervention techniques related to assistive technology in occupational therapy. The course focuses on application of assistive technology across the lifespan, and thus emphasizes use of both interventions in a variety of practice contexts and practice settings. Since technology options change rapidly, emphasis is on the clinical reasoning process used to select and evaluate interventions in rehabilitation, home, work, leisure and community technology-related practice areas. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 541L. Assistive Technology in Occupational Therapy Lab.1 Credit.

This lab course provides students with hands-on experience in advanced intervention techniques related to assistive technology in occupational therapy. The course focuses on application of assistive technology across the lifespan, and thus emphasizes use of both interventions in a variety of practice contexts and practice settings. Since technology options change rapidly, emphasis is on the clinical reasoning process used to select and evaluate interventions in rehabilitation, home, work, leisure and community technology-related practice areas. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 542. Work and Ergonomics.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the occupation of work applied across the lifespan and to various practice contexts and worker challenges. The course addresses topics related to the occupation of work, including employment acquisition, job performance, volunteerism, and retirement. Work tasks and work demands are analyzed relative to physical, cognitive, social, organizational, and environmental factors that impact job performance. Modifications that optimize worker functioning are examined as prevention and as rehabilitation. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 550. OT Research Methods.4 Credits.

This course addresses the importance of research in the practice of occupational therapy. The course examines the research theories and methods in occupational therapy practice. Students participate in designing and implementing entry-level research studies as well as analyzing and interpreting the professional literature. Students formulate the proposal for their spring capstone project.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 556. Professional Development.3 Credits.

This distance learning course focuses on the current issues related to the roles of the student transitioning to professional. The course emphasizes linking theory to practice, self-analysis and reflection upon academic experience, and relating those to different facets of clinical and professional reasoning as a funding mechanism in practice. Continued professional growth through the development of understanding of personal and professional responsibilities as a practicing therapist and a commitment to lifelong learning and professional advocacy also are addressed. Grant writing is included.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 565. Integrative Case Studies.2 Credits.

This course explores individual, group and population case studies of clients in occupational therapy. Students analyze each case using clinical reasoning, qualitative research strategies, frames of reference and best practices to develop integrative evaluation and intervention skills.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 570. Capstone Graduate Projects.3 Credits.

This capstone course is a culminating experience in the occupational therapy curriculum, which integrates all course-based material and fieldwork experiences with practical application. Students design and execute a research or creative project that is relevant to current and emerging practice areas in occupational therapy. Students gain experience in project management, critical analysis and professional presentations.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 580. Fieldwork Level IIb.6 Credits.

These supervised experiences provide the student with the opportunity to apply theory and clinical reasoning skills to the occupational therapy evaluation and intervention process for clients across the life span and in a variety of life environments. Students must abide by all fieldwork policies as listed in the program manual. Fieldwork is 12 weeks long.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OT 581. Fieldwork Level IIa.6 Credits.

These supervised experiences provide the student with the opportunity to apply theory and clinical reasoning skills to the occupational therapy evaluation and intervention process for clients across the life span and in a variety of life environments. Students must abide by all fieldwork policies as listed in the program manual. Fieldwork is 12 weeks long.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 607. Educational Leadership.3 Credits.

This course is intended to prepare occupational therapy practitioners to assume or enhance their educational leadership roles in a variety of health care and community-based programs. It provides advanced education in the areas of leadership and administration/management, ethics, decision-making and motivation.

Offered: Fall

OT 608. Entrepreneurial Concepts for Occupational Therapy.3 Credits.

This course provides the student with a critical analysis of entrepreneurial concepts in the practice of occupational therapy (business and private practice) including: designing opportunities, completing a needs assessment, defining the market or clientele, developing a business plan, developing a practice plan, billing, measuring effectiveness and growth, marketing and employee management. When possible the student's current practice experience is used for projects.

Offered: Spring

OT 615. Critical Writing I.3 Credits.

This course is the first in a sequence of courses focusing on scholarly reading and writing. Students investigate a specific area of interest, describe best practices as supported by evidence and theory and learn how to conduct a peer review of writing.

Offered: Every year, Spring Online

OT 620. Foundations in Teaching and Learning I.3 Credits.

This course is the first in a series of courses focusing on advanced topics in teaching and learning. Students explore various theoretical frameworks regarding learning and the relationship between learning theory and occupational therapy. Students work to develop the ability to incorporate learning theory into their educational practice.

Offered: Every year, Spring Online

OT 621. Creating Effective Learning Environments and Experiences.3 Credits.

This course is the second course in the series of courses focusing on advanced topics in teaching and learning. Building upon theoretical foundations explored in OT 620 Foundations in Teaching and Learning I, students explore various educational models and tools to enhance teaching and utilize design steps to develop professional, educational presentations.

Prerequisites: Take OT 620.
Offered: Every year, Summer Online

OT 625. Special Topics in School-Based Practice I.3 Credits.

This course is the first in a series of courses focusing on advanced topics in school-based practice. Students critique existing scholarship and professional documents regarding best practices in school-based practice, and identify and critique existing interventions utilized in school-based practice and their efficacy. Topics covered include legislations, assessment, intervention and whole school programming.

Offered: Every year, Spring Online

OT 626. Special Topics in School-Based Practice II.3 Credits.

This course is the second in a series of courses focusing on advanced topics in school-based practice. Students build upon work completed as part of OT 625 Special Topics in School-Based Practice I to develop a model of practice/intervention addressing "best practice" for practitioners working in school-based practice.

Prerequisites: Take OT 625;
Offered: Every year, Summer Online

OT 635. Scholarly Use of Evidence in Writing.3 Credits.

This course is the second in a sequence of courses focusing on scholarly reading and writing. Emphasis on determining proper use of evidence occurs throughout the course. Synthesis of scholarly evidence and literature culminates in the creation of a manuscript for submission to a professional trade magazine or journal.

Prerequisites: Take OT 615.
Offered: Every year, Summer Online

OT 640. Directed Study in Evidence-Based Practice.3 Credits.

Students learn the steps of the evidence-based practice continuum using a journal entry format. Each student follows the steps using actual practice case studies from his/her individual practice sites and presents the responses to each step in the process to discover evidence to guide the practice case questions. Peer interaction and feedback is critical to the realistic development of evidence to guide practice decisions. A major assignment is to have each student participate in the writing of a systematic review or an evidence-based practice brief for the profession. Students complete a needs assessment of a particular site or practice area as well.

Prerequisites: Take OT 654.
Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 650. Application of Theory and Exploration of Occupation.3 Credits.

This course begins by exploring occupation--the central construct of the profession. Students also look at occupational science as a disciplinary knowledge base. Current ideas about occupation-based practice in both traditional settings and emerging practice areas are analyzed. Theories and models of practice that guide occupation-based practice also are reviewed.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 651. Systems.3 Credits.

Knowledge of health care delivery in the U.S. is fundamental to providing occupational therapy services. A key element to providing relevant health care services is an understanding of the broader systems that influence and drive delivery models. This course addresses the general systems model as applied to the delivery of health care services. System components are addressed including the resources, the internal processes, external influences, measureable outcomes and stakeholders in service delivery systems. The course examines the range of service delivery models in OT including the traditional medical model, school-based, community, educational, home health, hospice and telehealth, among others. The course prepares students to analyze the key components of delivery system and determine how OT services are optimized in specific models.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 652. Doctoral Seminar.1 Credit.

Students create a professional development plan and an e-portfolio for doctoral work with goals and objectives related to occupation and evidence-based practice. This plan also relates to the core curriculum and chosen tracks. Students explore advanced evidence-based practice skills required to retrieve evidence. They also learn about the tools utilized by clinicians to enhance practice, how to be a consumer of scholarship, and proper use of evidence/citations.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 653. Policy/Ethics.2 Credits.

The future leaders of the profession need an understanding of the political and legal policies impacting occupational therapy, as well as the ethics involved in decision making. Students explore the role of the occupational therapist in advocacy as well as the concepts of social justice. The impact of these policies and decisions are reviewed in relationship to all settings and the occupational as well as psychosocial well-being of the individual client and populations of clients.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 654. Critical Inquiry of Scholarship.3 Credits.

This course is the first of a series of courses focusing on scholarship in the profession. Emphasis is placed on understanding the various forms of scholarship that are needed to drive the profession of occupational therapy forward and building a solid foundation needed to carry out a scholarly project. This course covers the scholarship process, with a focus on developing a question for scholarly exploration and ways of answering questions. Quantitative, qualitative, mixed method and participatory research methodologies are introduced.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 655. Professional Seminar.3 Credits.

This course integrates prior learning into the discussion of how to become an "agent of change" within the occupational therapy environment. Topics include the analysis of statistics related to occupational therapy, advocacy, leadership, group dynamics, systematic interactions and the ability to manage groups both internal and external to occupational therapy. As discussions progress, students are given the opportunity to participate in a panel discussion regarding these topics and how they relate to future capstone projects.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OT 656. Critical Inquiry of Scholarship II.4 Credits.

This course is the second of a series of courses focusing on scholarship in the profession. Emphasis is placed on developing a proposal for a scholarly project. Drawing on the content of OT 654, students develop the background to the project and problem statement, questions guiding the project informed by theory, a literature review and method section.

Prerequisites: Take OT 640 OT 654.
Offered: Every year, Summer

OT 660. Seminar: Innovations and Emerging Issues in Children and Youth.3 Credits.

The OT seminars OT 660, OT 661 and OT 662 present core content that is the same for all three courses during weeks one and two. The focus of the core weeks is on environmental scanning for evidence of change and locating evidence in the literature for that change. Weeks four through seven focus on the individual theme as selected by each student. The content is faculty facilitated in the thematic areas based on the OTD tracks.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 661. Seminar: Innovations and Emerging Issues in Environmental Adaptations.3 Credits.

The OT seminars OT 660, OT 661 and OT 662 present core content that is the same for all three courses during weeks one and two. The focus of the core weeks is on environmental scanning for evidence of change and locating evidence in the literature for that change. Weeks four through seven focus on the individual theme as selected by each student. The content is faculty facilitated in the thematic areas based on the OTD tracks.

OT 662. Seminar: Innovations and Emerging Issues in the Adult Health Care Continuum.3 Credits.

The OT seminars OT 660, OT 661 and OT 662 present core content that is the same for all three courses during weeks one and two. The focus of the core weeks is on environmental scanning for evidence of change and locating evidence in the literature for that change. Weeks four through seven focus on the individual theme as selected by each student. The content is faculty facilitated in the thematic areas based on the OTD tracks.

OT 670. Leadership in Program Development/Business.3 Credits.

Students analyze leadership styles as they relate to supervision in both public and private sectors. The course includes a review of skills required to be an entrepreneur, own a practice and navigate the policies required of a business.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 671. Leadership in Higher Education.3 Credits.

Students analyze leadership styles as they relate to the educational setting for those interested in academia. The course also includes a discussion of transitions from practice to the educational setting.

OT 672. Leadership in Practice.3 Credits.

Students analyze leadership styles as they relate to supervision of occupational therapy staff as well as the transition from a clinician to a supervisor or administrator.

OT 680. Capstone I.2 Credits.

This capstone course is a culminating experience in the occupational therapy curriculum, which integrates all core and track material. Students design and execute a scholarly or creative project that is relevant to current and emerging practice areas in occupational therapy. Students gain experience in project management, critical analysis and professional presentations.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 681. Capstone II.2 Credits.

This capstone course is a culminating experience in the occupational therapy curriculum, which integrates all core and track material. Students design and execute a scholarly or creative project that is relevant to current and emerging practice areas in occupational therapy. Students gain experience in project management, critical analysis and professional presentations.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 699. OT Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Offered: As needed