Department of Film, Television and Media Arts

The Department of Film, Television and Media Arts offers specialized programs that educate students in contemporary media practice, and demand that they excel as technically accom­plished, aesthetically grounded and expressively mature professionals. These programs are dedicated to skilled storytelling and the creation of documentary and narrative works in visual and audio media as well as other informative and entertaining programming for delivery on film, television, DVD, the Internet, mobile devices and all emerging media platforms.

To achieve these goals, students in the Department of Film, Television and Media Arts are immersed in techniques of visual storytelling that demand expertise in single and multi-camera video production and writing and producing for film, radio, television and the Internet. Because we believe that good media practice requires a solid understanding of media history and theory, this curriculum is balanced with courses that explore the role and impact of mass media in society. Formal course work is not only taught on campus but in recent years has taken place in Tralee, Ireland; Nice, France; and in Cape Town and Kruger National Park, South Africa.

Film, Television and Media Arts (FTM)

FTM 102. Understanding Film.3 Credits.

This survey of the art, industry and techniques of global cinema introduces students to the significance of film as an international medium. By exposing students to the work of outstanding filmmakers and to the major elements of film language, the course helps students develop their critical faculties and visual literacy. The course includes some weekly 2 1/2-hour screenings of full-length theatrical feature films and other short clip screenings and lecture/discussion sessions.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

FTM 110. Single Camera Production.3 Credits.

This course gives students a thorough grounding in the basic techniques of audio and video storytelling. Students learn basic audio production, visual composition, field camera practice, lighting fundamentals and digital video editing. This is a hands-on course that requires students to produce a number of media projects throughout the semester.

Offered: Every year, All

FTM 112. Multicamera Production.3 Credits.

This second course introduces students to the techniques of designing and producing creative and effective audiovisual communications primarily in a studio setting. Students learn to develop creative concepts and to take them from script to screen. Lighting, and principles of good composition, structure and program design are emphasized.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110;
Offered: Every year, All

FTM 230. Animation and Mobile Media.3 Credits.

This course introduces the concepts and production techniques that prepare students for creative work in mobile media. Students completing this course learn how to produce animated and interactive content for the web and mobile devices or kiosks. Projects may include simple animations, interactive stories, photo and video viewers, web interfaces, green screen, animations for video, and video projects optimized for the web.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110;
Offered: Every year, All

FTM 240. Analysis of the Moving Image.3 Credits.

How do we read images? This course explores the techniques used to create moving image media--including film, television and interactive media--from a formal and aesthetic perspective. Students learn to think and write critically about how the techniques of production work to communicate ideas and convey meaning and emotion to viewers. Sophomore status required.

Offered: Every year, All

FTM 245. Intermediate Production.3 Credits.

Media messages are created to meet a variety of goals, which are tailored to appeal to defined audiences. Media can be designed to entertain, to inform, to educate, to persuade or to sell. In this course, students are challenged to discern what makes a good story or project idea for each of several different content objectives. Students work through all phases of pre-production and production including scriptwriting, scheduling and budgeting as they complete a series of projects during the semester, with special emphasis on creative conceptualization, message and writing.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110;
Offered: Every year, All

FTM 300. Special Topics.3 Credits.

New or experimental courses on a range of topics in film, television and media arts that in the past have ranged from the impact of social media to visual effects.

Offered: As needed

FTM 310. Projects in Animation and Mobile Media.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the creation of advanced mobile media projects. Students are challenged to create projects that incorporate multiple forms of media delivered for the web, mobile devices or kiosks. Projects may include advanced animations, webisode stories with video and audio production, product promotions, maps, web interfaces, games, educational materials, mobile apps and other content.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 230;
Offered: Every year, Spring

FTM 320. History of Film I (to 1975).3 Credits.

This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, provides a foundation in the history and aesthetics of moving image arts. Through individual films, clips, lectures and discussion, students analyze the major international film movements, their genres, directors and themes that have contributed to the development of narrative cinema. Organized thematically, films are chosen to showcase aesthetic, historical, technological and ideological concepts and their impact on the evolution of film from its inception to 1975 .

Offered: Every year, Fall

FTM 322. History of Film (and Television) II.3 Credits.

This second part of a two-semester sequence builds on the history and aesthetics of moving image arts in film and also television from 1975 to the present. Through individual films, excerpts from films and television clips, lectures and discussion, students analyze the evolution of global television and major international film movements, their genres, directors and themes to understand how they have contributed to the development of television entertainment and narrative cinema. Organized thematically, works of film and television are chosen to showcase aesthetic, historical, technological and ideological concepts and their impact on the evolution of film and television. Sophomore status required.

Offered: Every year, Spring

FTM 342. Directing Film and Television.3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the history, theory and basic concepts of narrative single camera field and multi-camera studio direction for current and developing distribution platforms. This course emphasizes principles of dramatic structure, script breakdown and analysis, visualization and story boarding, preproduction scheduling and casting, working with actors to effectively shape performances and working with crew. Students prepare and direct a series of short scenes.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110 FTM 112;
Offered: Every year, Spring

FTM 355. Documentary Production.3 Credits.

This course challenges students to master the conceptual and technical skills of visual storytelling to produce more advanced, single-camera field projects on selected, specialized topics that may change from semester to semester. Past course content has included documentary production in South Africa and in Ireland, as well as in the United States. The course emphasizes professional production roles, including writing and directing, scheduling and production management, production, post-production, distribution and marketing.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110 FTM 112;
Offered: Every year, All

FTM 372. Screenwriting.3 Credits.

Students learn to shape stories for the screen. Emphasis is on dramatic structuring, character development, pacing and dialogue. Professional screenplays are analyzed and discussed, and final projects give students the opportunity to develop an original short screenplay.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 245;
Offered: Every year, All

FTM 375. Projects in Single Camera and Lighting.3 Credits.

This course covers such topics as the characteristics and qualities of light, lighting control, principles of visual composition and design, color, contrast, the properties of lenses, how film emulsions and image sensors react to light, filters, matte boxes and other image control devices, metering and exposure control, the effective use of various lighting instruments and accessories, electrical safety and the basics of gripping and gaffing on set and on location. Students learn in an active, hands-on workshop environment and produce a major project.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 245;
Offered: Every year, Fall

FTM 380. Projects in Audio Production (EN 303 GDD 303).3 Credits.

This course is about storytelling. Students use multitrack audio production to activate not only the human voice in narratives, but also the ambient sounds of the environment, the music in imagination and the more subtle inner-symphonies of moods, attitudes and emotions. Participants read and listen widely to gain a sense of the history and theory of radio art. The class asks questions and listens to answers. Students represent what they see and hear, and invent that which they do not see or hear. They sit and write in isolation, wrestle with not-so-familiar technologies, learn to become ruthless and artful editors, and share the results of their labors in a stimulating and mutually supportive workshop environment. Finally, they spend time identifying target audiences and looking at ways to distribute their work to the larger world of public radio.

Prerequisites: Take EN 201 or FTM 110;
Offered: Every year, All

FTM 390. Projects in Multicamera Production.3 Credits.

Attracting and keeping the audience's attention is the first responsibility of the director. This course gives students the opportunity to explore the art and craft of directing in a multicamera, high-definition studio environment. Participants examine the roles and responsibilities of the director, including shot composition, crew motivation, calling a live production and ethics. Students are asked to visually design a television program from concept to completion in a number of genres, including news, sports, sitcoms, dramas and commercials.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110 FTM 112;
Offered: Every year, All

FTM 392. Post-Production Techniques.3 Credits.

In this course, students explore such topics as the expressive capability of the editing process; how editing functions to "create" time, tempo and visual rhythm; the "building" of scenes in editing to achieve various dramatic goals; and telling the story through careful control of sound and image over time. Students gain experience in using the tools and techniques of modern digital post-production technology. Topics may include: post-production planning; continuity editing; digital video effects; compositing; "green screen" techniques; graphics design; 2D and 3D animation; audio mixing and sound design; interactivity; preparing video for broadband distribution and mobile devices; DVD design and authoring.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110 FTM 112;
Offered: Every year, All

FTM 393. Advanced Animation Techniques.3 Credits.

Students learn to create sophisticated 2D and 3D still and animated electronic graphics for video that are aesthetically pleasing, expressive and meaningful. Principles of good design, composition and color are stressed, as well as the ability to produce visual interest in support of communication goals.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110 FTM 112;
Offered: Every year, All

FTM 397. Summer Production Project.4 Credits.

This advanced production course is for juniors majoring in film, television and media arts. It takes place on campus or on the Nice, France, campus of a major French film and video institute (ESRA, Paris), and involves the writing, shooting and editing of a polished video project that is then presented to a professional jury.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110 FTM 112;
Offered: As needed, Summer

FTM 399. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110 FTM 112;
Offered: As needed

FTM 450. Senior Seminar in Film and Television.3 Credits.

This seminar entails an in-depth examination of issues and research perspectives in film and television. Seminar titles vary each term and may cover subject areas such as film history, reality television, political documentaries, docudrama and contemporary trends in the media industry. Students should consult the School of Communications course bulletin for information about each semester's offerings. Senior status is usually required.

Offered: Every year, All

FTM 493. Senior Project Colloquy: Preproduction.3 Credits.

This required 3-credit discussion, development, preproduction and production course must be taken in the semester prior to the student's undertaking of the Senior Project. Meeting collectively and individually, all fourth-year FTM students must be enrolled in this course in order to conceptualize and prepare preproduction materials essential for the successful completion of the Senior Project, and to undertake a new short production project, retrospective of their previous work. Individual class sessions are devoted to each aspect of preproduction and assignments that relate to each aspect are completed during the term. Prerequisite: senior status in FTM.

Offered: Every year, Fall

FTM 494. Senior Project Colloquy: Preproduction.1 Credit.

This required 1-credit discussion, development, preproduction and production course must be taken in the semester prior to the student's undertaking of the Senior Project. Meeting collectively and individually, all fourth-year FTM students must be enrolled in this course in order to conceptualize and prepare preproduction materials essential for the successful completion of the Senior Project, and to undertake a new short production project, retrospective of their previous work. Individual class sessions are devoted to each aspect of preproduction and assignments that relate to each aspect are completed during the term. Prerequisite: senior status in FTM.

Offered: Every year, Fall

FTM 495. Senior Project: Production.3 Credits.

In this capstone course, students are asked to create an individual thesis project that reflects the highest level of their abilities. From pitching their individual project ideas through writing, production and post-production, students are pushed to work at the peak of their skills. The creativity, quality and professionalism of the finished projects are judged by outside professionals and faculty and staff from the School of Communications FTM program, and give graduating seniors important portfolio material. Senior status in FTM is required.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 494;
Offered: Every year, Spring

FTM 499. Independent Study.3 Credits.