Medical Doctor

At the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine, we prepare students to become highly qualified, compassionate and culturally sensitive doctors. No matter which medical specialty you choose, you’ll be trained to view your patients through the lens of a primary care physician — always with an emphasis on patient-centered care. 

From the outset, you’ll learn evidence-based medicine through the integration of basic science concepts in Foundations of Medicine (FOM) and rigorous clinical training through Clinical Arts and Sciences (CAS). In September of your first year, you’ll be paired with a community physician to practice your clinical skills, working with patients through our innovative Medical Student Home (MeSH) program. 

Throughout your four years of medical school, you will work closely with faculty mentors, career advisers and clinical faculty physicians in various medical settings. They’ll help you choose courses, plan your required and elective fourth-year clerkships, and identify residency programs that align to your interests and career goals. To reinforce critical thinking skills and self-directed learning, you will also complete a project under the guidance of a mentor in the Scholarly Reflection and Concentration/Capstone course (SRCC).   

The medical school is located on our interprofessional North Haven Campus with the schools of health sciences, nursing and law. This creates a collaborative learning environment for students pursuing degrees in a multitude of health care professions, including physical therapy, occupational therapy and physician assistant. Our state-of-the-art facilities include an operating suite with two high-fidelity simulation rooms, a SimMan suite of lifelike mannequins that function as patient simulators and labs with the latest imaging equipment. Our facility includes 16 patient rooms where students practice examining simulated patients. 

We have affiliations with several community hospitals in urban, suburban and rural settings. Our principal hospital affiliates are St. Vincent’s Medical Center in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and St. Francis Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut. You'll experience a variety of clinical work placements that help you to determine where you see yourself practicing medicine during and after your residency years. 

Medical Doctor Program of Study

During the first two years, the curriculum is organized around three integrated courses that provide students with a comprehensive view of evidence-based medicine:

Year 1

Required courses
MED 811Foundations of Medicine (18 hours/week)
MED 812Clinical Arts and Sciences (6 hours/week)
MED 813Scholarly Concentration (SRCC) (4 hours/week)
Note: Students take an 01 section in the Fall—receive IP grades and then are registered for the 02 section in the spring. All courses are required for degree completion.
MED 811 - Foundations of Medicine I

Course Goal: The goal of Foundations of Medicine (FOM) I is for medical students to achieve foundational knowledge in the basic medical sciences, with an emphasis on gaining a detailed understanding of common and representative illnesses. By the end of year one, students are knowledgeable in human biology and the impact that psychological, social, cultural and economic forces have on human health. They are able to discuss the epidemiology and prevention of major medical conditions. Knowledge gained in FOM I will be revisited and expanded the following year in FOM II.

The course is divided into foundational and organ system blocks with horizontal and vertical integration across the blocks and with the other courses. The School of Medicine’s longitudinal themes of pharmacology, nutrition, behavioral and social sciences, biomedical ethics and epidemiology also are integrated throughout the curriculum as they relate to specific organs and diseases throughout each block.

The course is taught through a variety of teaching methods including lectures and small group events that employ case-based learning activities. Dissection-based anatomy is integrated across all of the organ system blocks in the first year. 

MED 812 - Clinical Arts and Science I

Clinical Arts and Sciences (CAS) I is a contemporary introduction to clinical medicine course that aims to teach foundational clinical skills in a safe, collaborative environment incorporating experiential learning in both simulated and real clinical settings. CAS has two sections providing up to 6-8 hours of curricular activity each week.

Foundations of Clinical Care (FCC): This section is dedicated to teaching clinical skills, predominantly in a small group setting of eight students and two experienced physicians. Students learn patient-centered interviewing, history taking, communication and physical examination. Medical documentation and oral presentations are emphasized throughout the academic year. Clinical reasoning and motivational interviewing are introduced in semester two. Basic procedural skills training and interprofessional activities centered around ultrasound training also provide significant experiential learning opportunities. 

Simulated practice with standardized patients (SPs) is one of the predominant features of this section of the course.  Student knowledge of clinical skills is assessed via formative objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) on a monthly basis and with a summative OSCE at the end of the academic year. Faculty complete a summative evaluation of student performance each semester. The course also encourages learners’ understanding of professionalism and professional identity formation with self-assessments such as video review and goal setting opportunities, in addition to peer feedback and feedback from the SPs and faculty.

Medical Student Home (MeSH): This section pairs a medical student with a practicing community physician with the purpose of providing each medical student with a supervised environment to practice the foundational clinical skills learned in FCC. Students spend one afternoon a week, 4 hours at a time, in the physician’s office-based practice. Physicians directly observe students interview and examine patients. Physicians provide formative feedback through a workplace based assessment program. A summative faculty evaluation of students is also completed.

MED 813 - Scholarly Reflection & Concentration Capstone I

Course Goal: Scholarly Reflection and Concentration/Capstone (SRCC) is a four-year course focused on seven core domains: Evaluating Information Sources, Critical Appraisal of Literature, Interacting with and Interpreting Data, Self-Reflection, Personalized Curriculum, Responsible Research Practice, and Scholarship.

SRCC allows learners to personalize their curriculum and prepare for scholarly endeavors during residency and future practice. They self-design and execute a capstone project in an area they are passionate about. Learners use narrative medicine and mentoring to develop personally and professionally. They gain both conceptual understanding and practical skills in research methods, epidemiology, medical informatics, biostatistics, evaluating information sources, and critical appraisal of medical literature. The information presented in this course is integrated whenever possible with material in the Foundations of Medicine and the Clinical Arts and Sciences courses, to enable learners to apply biostatistics, epidemiology, and medical informatics to community and public health, medical literature interpretation, and clinical decision-making. 

Year 2

Required courses
MED 821Foundations of Medicine (18 hours/week)
MED 822Clinical Arts and Sciences (6 hours/week)
MED 823Scholarly Concentration (SRCC) (4 hours/week)
Note: Students take an 01 section in the Fall – receive IP grades then are registered for the 02 section in the spring. All courses are required for degree completion.
MED 821 - Foundations of Medicine II

Course Goal: Building on the foundation provided by the FOM I curriculum, the goal of FOM II is for medical students to attain essential knowledge and skills related to the pathophysiology and epidemiology of diseases. In addition, students develop a broad understanding of treatment paradigms for common medical disorders. The longitudinal themes of behavioral and social sciences, biomedical ethics, epidemiology, pharmacology and nutrition are interwoven into curricular content in FOM II.

Problem Based Learning (PBL) is a major instructional component in FOM II and integrates active and self-directed learning with the development of clinical reasoning skills in the assessment of patient symptoms, signs and laboratory findings. Collaborative and professional participation in this activity are essential components of PBL.

MED 822 - Clinical Arts and Science II

Clinical Arts and Sciences (CAS) II is a contemporary introduction to clinical medicine course that aims to teach foundational clinical skills in a safe, collaborative environment incorporating experiential learning in both simulated and real clinical settings. CAS has two sections providing up to 6-8 hours of curricular activity each week.

Foundations of Clinical Care (FCC): This section is dedicated to teaching clinical skills, predominantly in a small group setting of eight students and two experienced physicians. Students build upon the skills they learned in CAS I. Sessions are dedicated to advanced physical examination techniques as well as advanced communication skills such as delivering unwelcome news and sharing medical information. Medical documentation and oral presentations continue to be emphasized throughout the academic year with a focus on assessment and plan in CAS II. Clinical reasoning becomes a central component of the course in year two with a monthly instructional sessions. Basic procedural skills training and interprofessional activities centered around ultrasound training also provide significant experiential learning opportunities. 

Simulated practice with standardized patients (SPs) is one of the predominant features of this section of the course. Student knowledge of clinical skills is assessed via formative objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) on a monthly basis and with a summative OSCE at the end of the academic year. Faculty complete a summative evaluation of student performance each semester. The course also encourages learners’ understanding of professionalism and professional identity formation with self-assessments such as video review and goal setting opportunities, in addition to peer feedback and feedback from the SPs and faculty.

Medical Student Home (MeSH): This section pairs a medical student with a practicing community physician with the purpose of providing each medical student with a supervised environment to practice the foundational clinical skills learned in FCC. Students spend one afternoon a week, 4 hours at a time, in the physician’s office-based practice. Physicians directly observe students interview and examine patients. Physicians provide formative feedback through a workplace based assessment program.  A summative faculty evaluation of students is also completed.

MED 823 - Scholarly Reflection & Concentration Capstone II

Course Goal: Scholarly Reflection and Concentration/Capstone (SRCC) is a four-year course focused on seven core domains: Evaluating Information Sources, Critical Appraisal of Literature, Interacting with and Interpreting Data, Self-Reflection, Personalized Curriculum, Responsible Research Practice, and Scholarship.

SRCC allows learners to personalize their curriculum and prepare for scholarly endeavors during residency and future practice. They self-design and execute a capstone project in an area they are passionate about. Learners use narrative medicine and mentoring to develop personally and professionally. They gain both conceptual understanding and practical skills in research methods, epidemiology, medical informatics, biostatistics, evaluating information sources, and critical appraisal of medical literature. The information presented in this course is integrated whenever possible with material in the Foundations of Medicine and the Clinical Arts and Sciences courses, to enable learners to apply biostatistics, epidemiology, and medical informatics to community and public health, medical literature interpretation, and clinical decision-making

Clinical Requirements

Year 3 

The third year comprises in-depth clinical experiences in six core specialties. Students receive training in both ambulatory and inpatient settings. Students take a national board exam for each core  specialty. Based on their clinical evaluation, Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) and a “shelf” exam, students are assigned an Honors, High Pass, Pass, or Fail. A selected group of students will have the option to participate in a longitudinal integrated clerkship in Maine that encompasses all of the core clerkships. All students will have taken Step 1 before starting their fourth year. There are opportunities for students to take electives in their third year after meeting specified requirements.

MED 831Internal Medicine Clerkship
MED 832Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship
MED 833Pediatrics Clerkship
MED 834Primary Care Clerkship
MED 835Psychiatry Clerkship
MED 836Surgery Clerkship

Year 4 

The Class of 2021 will choose a four-week required clerkship, a sub-internship and electives. Students will also complete and present their Capstone project and take USMLE® Step 2 Clinical Knowledge and Clinical Skills examinations. Finally, there is dedicated time for residency interviews during this year.

Required Clerkships - 4 weeks
*The Class of 2021 will choose either MED 841 or MED 842.
MED 841Emergency Medicine Clerkship (4 weeks)
MED 842Critical Care Clerkship (4 weeks)
MED 843Capstone Course
Required Sub-Internship - 4 weeks (choose one of the following):
Internal Medicine Sub-Internship
Pediatric Sub Internship
Surgery Sub Internsip
Family Medicine Sub Internship
Ob/Gyn Sub-I
Psychiatry Sub-I

Electives

Students take a minimum of 24 weeks of electives of their choice. Electives can be taken at the Netter School of Medicine or students can participate in away rotations — internationally or domestically as available and meeting criteria. Custom electives are also an option, subject to approval. Elective choices vary depending on site availability. 

Accreditation

The medical school is accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education. The LCME is jointly sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the American Medical Association (AMA). The next review will take place October 2021.

Technical Standards

Quinnipiac University is committed to admitting qualified applicants without regard to race, ethnicity, age, national or ethnic origin, disability, gender identity, sexual orientation, marital status or religion. Qualified applicants to the the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine are individuals who demonstrate the cognitive and physical abilities, and behavioral and communication skills required to complete a rigorous curriculum and meet certain technical standards for medical students and physicians.The MD degree signifies the acquisition of general knowledge in the fields necessary for the practice of medicine. A graduate of the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine of Quinnipiac University must have the knowledge and skills to function in various clinical settings and to provide a wide spectrum of care.

To acquire the requisite knowledge and skills, students must possess both sensory and motor abilities that permit them to accomplish the activities described in these standards, with or without reasonable accommodations. A student must be able to take in information received by whatever sensory function is employed, consistently, rapidly and accurately. Students must be able to learn, integrate,analyze and synthesize data.

Providing care for patients' needs is essential to the role of a physician and comprises a significant component of training. A student must be able to tolerate physically challenging workloads and function under stress. The responsibilities of medical students may require their presence and attention during daytime and nighttime hours. A student in the School of Medicine must be able to meet the following standards:

1. Observation

Students must have sufficient visual ability to be able to observe patients accurately from a distance and close at hand. They must be able to observe and participate in laboratory exercises and demonstrations.They must be capable of viewing and developing the skills needed to interpret diagnostic modalities. Students must be able to obtain a medical history and perform a complete physical exam,including detecting and interpreting non-verbal communication such as change in posture, body language, mood and facial expressions demonstrated by patients.

2. Communication

Students must be able to communicate effectively, in both written and oral English, and must be able to speak with and comprehend patients, their families and other members of the health care team. Students must be capable of establishing rapport with patients and families. Students must be able to compose and record information accurately and clearly.

3. Motor and Sensory Function

Students must have sufficient motor and sensory function necessary to conduct a routine history and physical examination, differentiate normal from abnormal findings, and document their findings. Students must have sufficient motor function in order to conduct movements required to provide general care and emergency treatment to patients according to acceptable medical practices. Students must have sufficient motor ability to access and perform at clinical sites required for mandatory experiences.

4. Intellectual, Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Ability

Students must have sufficient cognitive abilities to master the body of knowledge comprising the curriculum of the School of Medicine. They must be able to recall large amounts of information, perform scientific measurements and calculations, and understand and learn through a variety of instructional modalities including but not limited to: classroom instruction, small group discussion, individual and self-directed study of materials, preparation and presentation of written and oral reports, peer review and assessment, as well as use of computer-based technologies. Students must demonstrate reasoning abilities necessary to gather, analyze, synthesize and integrate information from varying sources efficiently and effectively. They must be able to measure and calculate accurately, and be able to perceive 3D relationships and understand the spatial relationships of structures.

5. Attitudinal, Behavioral, Interpersonal and Emotional Characteristics

Students must have the capacity to learn and understand ethical principles, as well as state and federal statutes governing the practice of medicine. Students must demonstrate the maturity, emotional stability and sensitivity required to form effective relationships with patients, faculty, staff, colleagues and all members of the health care team. They must exhibit honesty, integrity, self-sacrifice and dedication.Students must have the capacity to effectively communicate with and provide care for, in a nonjudgmental manner, individuals whose culture, spiritual beliefs, physical or mental abilities, sexual orientation or gender expression differ from their own. They must be able to examine the entire patient, male and female, regardless of their social, cultural or religious beliefs.

Students must have the capacity to develop the requisite skills needed to identify personal biases, reactions and responses as well as recognize differing points of view, and not allow personal attitudes, perceptions or stereotypes to compromise patient care.

Students must be of sufficient emotional and mental health to utilize fully their abilities, exercise sound judgment and complete educational and patient care responsibilities with courtesy, compassion and respect. They must be capable of modifying their behavior in response to feedback and evaluation. Students must exhibit adaptability and be able to work effectively under stress and tolerate an often physically taxing workload. Individuals whose performance is impaired by abuse of substances, including alcohol, are not suitable candidates for admission, promotion or graduation.

6. Ethical and Legal Considerations

Candidates for admission must meet the legal standards to practice medicine in the State of Connecticut. Candidates must therefore provide written explanation of any felony offenses or disciplinary actions taken against them prior to matriculation, and commit to notifying the associate dean for student affairs immediately in the event of conviction of any felony offense while a student of the School of Medicine. Failure to disclose such offenses may lead to disciplinary action by the School of Medicine, including dismissal.

The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine will consider any candidate who demonstrates the ability to perform the skills specified in these technical standards, with or without reasonable accommodation. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 address the provision of services and accommodations for qualified individuals with disabilities. Services for students with disabilities are provided to qualified students to ensure equal access to educational opportunities, programs and activities in the most integrated setting possible. In the consideration of students for admission and in the training of students for the MD degree, it is essential that the integrity of the curriculum be maintained, that elements of the curriculum considered necessary for the education of a physician be preserved and that the health and safety of patients be considered vital. As such, students must be able to perform in an independent manner with such accommodations. The use of a trained intermediary is not acceptable in many clinical situations as judgment is mediated by someone else’s power of selection, observation and interpretation. Candidates for the MD degree will be assessed on a regular basis according to the academic and technical standards of the School of Medicine on their abilities to meet the curricular requirements.

Students who are interested in requesting accommodations are instructed to follow the procedures outlined in the Student Academic Policies. They include the following steps:

  • Submit a completed Accommodation Request Form for Students with Disabilities to the university Office of Student Accessibility.
  • Provide current, supporting documentation from a licensed physician, psychologist, or other appropriately credentialed evaluator.

Documentation must be submitted sufficiently in advance of an exam, course, program, workshop or activity in which accommodations are requested, in order to allow for appropriate review and evaluation of materials submitted. The student may be required to provide additional evaluation materials. Approved requests are forwarded to the associate dean for student affairs and senior associate dean for academic affairs in order to determine reasonable accommodations.

The School of Medicine reserves the right to provide services only to students who complete and provide results of evaluations within the specified time frame and who follow the instructions provided by the School of Medicine.

Students must complete the following requirements to be eligible for graduation from the School of Medicine: 

  • Obtain a satisfactory grade in each course

  • Successfully complete an approved concentration/capstone project that includes satisfactory completion of concentration electives

  • Successfully complete the Y3-Y4 clinical experiences

  • Pass USMLE Steps 1 and 2 (CK and CS)

  • Complete the community service and service learning requirements

  • Demonstrate the personal, professional and ethical ethical attitudes and behaviors expected of a physician graduate of the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University

Students who have completed all requirements for graduation may use remaining curricular time as they choose (electives or vacation). Students will be encouraged to use the extra time to take electives that enrich their learning.

Students must complete the requirements of each academic year within a two-year period, but must complete the curriculum and meet all graduation requirements within a six-year period. Additional time to complete the curricular requirements may be stipulated as part of an accommodation made under the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Approved leaves of absence (refer to section XIX. Leaves of Absence) do not count toward time needed to complete curricular requirements. The Promotions and Performance Standards Committee has the discretion to determine whether portions, or all, of an academic year are counted toward this requirement.