Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training

Program Contact: Stephen Straub 203-582-8443

Athletic Training education at Quinnipiac is a four-year undergraduate program preparing students to sit for the national certification exam (BOCATC.org), which permits the student to work as a Certified Athletic Trainer (http://www.nata.org/). This direct entry program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (https://caate.net) and offers a highly personalized learning environment featuring small classes and ready access to faculty,  which reflects the university’s commitment to excellence in teaching, as well as support for scholarship and professional development. The Athletic Training and Sports Medicine faculty share a service orientation toward the students and their needs. The program also strives to prepare graduates who manifest critical and creative thinking, effective communication skills, informed value judgments, and who possess an educational foundation for continued growth and development in a changing world of diverse cultures and people.

BS in Athletic Training Curriculum

Preprofessional Component

Examination and an evaluation of high school units presented determine initial placement in the English and mathematics courses. The minimum mathematics requirement is MA 275. It is strongly suggested that biology and athletic training courses are completed in the appropriate semesters as indicated. The following courses must be completed with a C- or better and a minimum GPA of 2.67.

BIO 101
101L
General Biology I
and General Biology I Lab
4
BIO 102
102L
General Biology II
and General Biology Lab II
4
BIO 211
211L
Human Anatomy & Physiology I
and Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab I
4
BIO 212
212L
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
and Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
4
CHE 101
101L
Fundamentals of General, Organic and Biological Chemistry I
and Fundamentals of General, Organic and Biological Chemistry I Lab 1
4
CHE 102
102L
Fundamentals of General, Organic and Biological Chemistry II
and Fundamentals of General, Organic and Biological Chemistry II Lab 1
4
MA 275Biostatistics3
Total Credits27

Where applicable, courses may be used to satisfy University Curriculum requirements. Progression to the professional component occurs in the fourth semester or second year, spring semester.

The following courses must be completed with a minimum of a B- at Quinnipiac and prior to entry into the professional component of the athletic training program. All AT courses must be taken at Quinnipiac.

AT 114Introduction to Athletic Training/Sports Medicine2
AT 115Introduction to Kinesiology3
AT 116Introduction to Fitness & Conditioning2
AT 214Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries3
AT 216
216L
Emergency Management of Athletic Trauma
and Emergency Management of Athletic Trauma Lab
3
AT 250
250L
Introduction to Evaluation and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Injuries
and Introduction to Evaluation and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Injuries
4
Total Credits17

Professional Component

The Admissions Progression and Retention Committee for the program in athletic training is responsible for evaluating and screening candidates for the professional component of the program. Program requirements are established in conjunction with the guidelines established by the Educational Council of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association and are acceptable to the school and university administration. While a good deal of the athletic training students’ clinical assignments (clinical practicum I–V) occur at Quinnipiac, off-campus assignments also are required. Students are responsible for transportation to and from all off-campus sites and should plan to have a vehicle by the fourth semester. Most off-campus sites are within 15 miles from the main campus. Moreover, students involved in varsity athletics normally require additional semester(s) to complete the program.

The curriculum for the professional courses in the program is subject to modification as deemed necessary to maintain a high-quality educational experience and keep current with best practices in the profession.

Athletic Training Curriculum

Plan of Study Grid
First Year
Fall SemesterCredits
BIO 101
101L
General Biology I
and General Biology I Lab(UC) science
4
CHE 101
101L
Fundamentals of General, Organic and Biological Chemistry I
and Fundamentals of General, Organic and Biological Chemistry I Lab 1
4
EN 101 Introduction to Academic Reading and Writing(UC) Freshman Composition 3
UC Fine Arts 3
FYS 101 First Year Seminar 3
 Credits17
Spring Semester
AT 114 Introduction to Athletic Training/Sports Medicine 2 2
AT 115 Introduction to Kinesiology 3
AT 116 Introduction to Fitness & Conditioning 2 2
BIO 102
102L
General Biology II
and General Biology Lab II(UC) Science
4
CHE 102
102L
Fundamentals of General, Organic and Biological Chemistry II
and Fundamentals of General, Organic and Biological Chemistry II Lab 1
4
EN 102 Academic Writing and Research(UC) Freshman Composition 3
 Credits18
Second Year
Fall Semester
AT 214 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries 3
AT 216
216L
Emergency Management of Athletic Trauma
and Emergency Management of Athletic Trauma Lab
3
AT 250
250L
Introduction to Evaluation and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Injuries
and Introduction to Evaluation and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Injuries
4
BIO 211
211L
Human Anatomy & Physiology I
and Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab I
4
MA 275 Biostatistics(UC) Quantitative Literacy 3
 Credits17
Spring Semester
AT 215
215L
Therapeutic Modalities
and Therapeutic Modalities Lab
4
AT 210 Introduction to Evidence-Based Practice 2
AT 251
251L
Evaluation and Treatment of Lower Extremity Musculoskeletal Injuries
and Evaluation and Treatment of Lower Extremity Musculoskeletal Injuries Lab
4
AT 290 Clinical Practicum I, Risk Management And Injury Prevention 2
AT 290C Clinical Practicum I 1
BIO 212
212L
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
and Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
4
 Credits17
Third Year
Fall Semester
AT 350
350L
Evaluation and Treatment of Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Injuries
and Evaluation and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Injuries Lab
4
AT 351
351L
General Medical Conditions and Treatment
and General Medical Conditions and Treatments Lab
4
AT 390 Clinical Practicum II, Athletic Protective Equipment 2
AT 390C Clinical Practicum II, Clinical 1
BMS 300
300L
The Physiology of Human Performance I
and The Physiology of Human Performance I Lab
4
PS 101 Introduction to Psychology (UC social science) 3
 Credits18
Spring Semester
AT 330 Nutrition for Sport and Fitness 3
AT 352
352L
Evaluation and Treatment of Spinal Injuries
and Evaluation and Treatment of the Spinal Injuries Lab
4
AT 391C Clinical Practicum III 1
BMS 301
301L
Physiology of Human Performance II
and Physiology of Human Performance II Lab
4
PS 272 Abnormal Psychology (UC social science) 3
 Credits15
Fourth Year
Fall Semester
AT 450 Administration and Management in Athletic Training 3
AT 490C Clinical Practicum IV 1
QU 420 Integrative Capstone 3
UC Electives (2) 6
 Credits13
Spring Semester
AT 491 Clinical Practicum V, Professional and Career Preparation 2
AT 491C Clinical Practicum V, Clinical 1
UC Elective 3
UC Humanities 3
UC Humanities 3
 Credits12
 Total Credits127
1

Students enrolled in the AT/DPT dual program or interested in certain graduate programs should substitute CHE 110CHE 111 for CHE 101CHE 102.

2

These AT courses have a laboratory and/or clinical component.

**

Students admitted to the AT/DPT dual major need to take PHY 110, PHY 111 and MA 141 (Total credits 132).

A GPA of 3.0 must be maintained each semester during the professional component; C, D and F grades are unacceptable in the professional component of the program.

The Athletic Training program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

Departmental and Program Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Athletic Training and Sports Medicine is to provide a quality education program through which students obtain the knowledge and psychomotor skills necessary to practice as athletic trainers certified by the Board of Certification. Importance is placed upon the provision of opportunities within the curriculum for the development of skills encompassing the domains of athletic training. Strong emphasis is placed on the practical clinical experience coupled with specific professional course work. Recognizing the importance of excellence in teaching and instruction, the faculty, in its commitment to the combination of diverse clinical and intellectual experiences, collaborates in educating students.

The Athletic Training education program offers a highly personalized learning environment featuring small classes and ready access to faculty; reflecting the university's commitment to excellence in teaching, the Athletic Training and Sports Medicine faculty share a service orientation toward the students and their needs. The program also strives to prepare graduates who manifest critical and creative thinking, effective communication skills, informed value judgments and who possess an educational foundation for continued growth and development in a changing world of diverse cultures and people.

Direct Entry

Candidates applying for admission to the Athletic Training program from high school are required to have at least three years of high school college preparatory mathematics, one year of biology, one year of chemistry and one year of physics. In addition, the scores of the SAT or the ACT are an important consideration. Related health care experience is highly desirable. Prospective candidates also must satisfy general Quinnipiac University admission requirements.

All applications must include three letters of reference. A personal interview may be requested with representatives of the Admissions Office to discuss program requirements and the applicant’s professional interests and commitments.

Applications are accepted for admission to the fall semester only.

Admission to Quinnipiac University does not guarantee admission to the Athletic Training program, unless officially accepted into the program. Students enrolled in the program’s preprofessional component (semesters 1–3) must achieve a B- or better in AT 114, AT 115, AT 116, AT 214, AT 216 and AT 250 and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.67 upon completion of all additional preprofessional requirements including all program science and math requirements to qualify for admission into the professional component of the program (D and F grades in the required science and math courses are unacceptable).

All AT courses must be taken and completed at Quinnipiac University. Professional component students (semesters 4–8) must earn at least a B- in all professional component courses and maintain a GPA of 3.0 each semester during the professional component. Students who fail to maintain these grade requirements are subject to dismissal from the program.

Students enrolled in the Athletic Training program, or other majors that provide prerequisite requirements for the graduate DPT program, may apply for entry into the three-year Doctor of Physical Therapy graduate program after attending an information session in the fall of their BS program. Admission is competitive and is based on performance and space availability.

Technical Standards for Admission

The Athletic Training program is a rigorous and intense program that places specific requirements and demands on the students enrolled in the program. An objective of this program is to prepare graduates to enter a variety of employment settings and to render care to a wide spectrum of individuals engaged in physical activity. The technical standards set forth by the Athletic Training program establish the essential qualities considered necessary for admitted students to this program to achieve the knowledge, skills and competencies of an entry-level athletic trainer, as well as meet the expectations of the program’s accrediting agency: Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

All students admitted to the program must meet the established abilities and expectations. In the event a student is unable to fulfill these technical standards, with or without reasonable accommodation, the student will not be admitted or may be dismissed from the program.

Candidates for selection to the program are required to verify they understand and meet the technical standards or that they believe that, with certain reasonable accommodations, the technical standards can be met. Verification of understanding includes the student reading, signing and returning a copy of the Technical Standards Agreement to the program director prior to arrival on campus in the fall semester. A listing of the technical standards and an agreement form for the Athletic Training program can be found here . If the student fails to complete the agreement form prior to the first day of classes, the student is admitted to the university but may be required to reapply for the Athletic Training program.

Background Check and Immunizations

All students entering the Athletic Training program, and the health care professions in general, should be aware that most professional credentialing agencies require a background check prior to awarding professional credentials. Information regarding background checks for those seeking to become certified athletic trainers can be found at www.bocatc.org.

For Athletic Training, the affidavit portion of the certification exam application requires candidates to report any felony or misdemeanor conviction along with any judgments of negligence, malpractice or misconduct. During the application process for the national certifying examination, candidates must submit an explanation of the events that led to the conviction(s), copy of court documents(s), including, but not limited to, an arrest report, sentence recommendation, compliance of all court requirements and proof of payment of all related fines.

Candidates may request a predetermination of eligibility at any time by submitting their documentation prior to their application. The Professional Practice and Discipline Committee reviews all convictions. Candidates are notified in writing of the committee’s decision. Please review the Professional Practice and Disciplinary Guidelines and Procedures for details.

Students enrolled in the Quinnipiac University Athletic Training program will be required to complete criminal and sex offender background checks and submit required health and immunization records prior to initiation of clinical rotations. The cost of the background checks and health assurance measures are the responsibility of the individual student. A complete listing of the immunizations is available on the program website.

Transfer Students from Other Colleges and Universities

Transfer students from other colleges and universities may be accepted into the Athletic Training program based on space availability. These students must meet the course requirements, performance standards (GPA of 2.67) and technical standards of the program. The students must complete the general science requirements, AT 114, AT 115, AT 116, AT 214, AT 216 and AT 250 prior to entry into the professional component of the program or the fourth semester of the course sequence. AT 114, AT 115, AT 116, AT 214, AT 216 and AT 250 must be taken at Quinnipiac.

Athletic Training courses from the student’s previous institution will not be considered for replacement of BMS 300, BMS 301 or any of the athletic training courses offered at Quinnipiac.

Transfer Students from within Quinnipiac

Students currently attending Quinnipiac in another program may be accepted into the Athletic Training program based on space availability and review of qualifications by the program director. Students may apply through the department upon completion of the general science requirements, AT 114, AT 115, AT 116, AT 214, AT 216 and AT 250 prior to entry into the professional component of the program or the fourth semester of the course sequence. These students must meet the course requirements, performance standards (GPA of 2.67) and technical standards of the program.

The Athletic Training education program at Quinnipiac University is accredited by:

The Commission on Accreditation Athletic of Training Education (CAATE.net),

6850 Austin Center Blvd., Suite 100 

Austin, TX 78731-3184

Phone: 512-733-9700 

The program received a 10-year accreditation (the maximum available) in 2008. The re-accredidation process will commence in June 2018 with the submission of a self-study report to CAATE.

In order to become a Certified Athletic Trainer, a candidate must pass a national certification examination. The program has a three-year aggregate first time pass rate of 100 percent. Here are our certification examination results by year:

Additional program costs:

As a clinical education program, the Athletic Training major requires some expenses that go beyond standard university tuition and fees:

  1. Clinical Education Travel (gas, parking, public transportation) – Students will have at least two clinical rotation experiences that take him/her off campus.  For this rotation, the student will typically be traveling 4 – 5X per week for practice, games and treatments. While a car is not absolutely required, it increases the variety and flexibility of clinical experiences available to the student. These rotations will start during the sophomore year. Costs - variable

  2. Immunizations: Consistent with the School of Health Sciences Policy, all students must have a full battery of immunizations and in some cases titer affirmation of immunity for common diseases including but not limited to: MMR, HepB, varicella, polio, TDAP, TB and influenza. These must be documented prior to the start of clinical experiences during the sophomore year and must be maintained through the undergraduate education. Costs – variable

  3. Background Check: All students must undergo a background check prior to the start for clinical observations in the sophomore year. This check must be updated at the start of the senior year. Costs – approx. $75 per review depending on the home state

  4. Liability Insurance: All students have liability insurance coverage through the university, free of charge, while performing required clinical activity. Students may choose to purchase additional coverage at their own expense.

  5. My Record Tracker: Consistent with School of Health Sciences Policy, students must sign up for and maintain an online account with MRT. This program tracks all student health and safety records, provides documentation to prospective clinical sites, and provides notification of impending expiration dates. Cost - Approx $18 per year

  6. Professional Association Membership: Students are strongly encouraged (but not required) to join the professional association (NATA). Costs - $55 per year

  7. BOC Certification Exam: Professional certification is limited to those who pass the BOC certification examination (typically taken during the last semester of enrollment). Costs - $300 for NATA members, $375 for non-NATA members

AT 114. Introduction to Athletic Training/Sports Medicine.2 Credits.

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the role of an athletic trainer in sports and health care. AT major only or permission of instructor.

Corequisites: Take AT 114L
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 114L. Introduction to the Clinical Environment.0 Credits.

Lab to accompany AT 114. This eight-week session is required for AT majors or those considering transferring into the major. AT major only or permission of instructor. (2 lab hrs.)

Corequisites: Take AT 114
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 115. Introduction to Kinesiology.3 Credits.

This introductory course explores the way the musculoskeletal system produces movement patterns in humans. Musculoskeletal anatomy, joint arthrology, muscular mechanics and biomechanical principals are used to perform muscular analyses of both the upper and lower extremities and the trunk. AT major only or permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 101;
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 116. Introduction to Fitness & Conditioning.2 Credits.

This introductory lab and lecture course teaches the fundamentals of basic fitness and exercise. Students engage in fitness assessments and design of personal conditioning programs for healthy subjects. For AT major only or permission of instructor.

Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 201. Medical Aspects of Sports and Activity (SPS 201).3 Credits.

This course is aimed at individuals who are interested in working in a sports-related field (e.g., coaches, journalists or managers). It provides an overview of a variety of sports medicine-related topics, including common sports injuries, an introduction to sports psychology and current events in the sports medicine. Students who take AT 201 cannot also receive credit for AT 214.

Prerequisites: Take one 4-credit lab science course;
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

AT 210. Introduction to Evidence-Based Practice.2 Credits.

Evidence-based practice in health care is the integration of the best available research with clinical expertise in the context of patient characteristics, culture and preferences. This is an introductory course in the processes associated with collecting and utilizing evidence to make clinical decisions.

Prerequisites: Take MA 275;
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 214. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries.3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an overview of the athletic training profession with an emphasis on the basic fundamentals utilized by the athletic trainer in prevention, recognition, care, treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. AT major only or permission of instructor. Students who take AT 214 cannot also receive credit for AT 201 or HSC 214.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 102-102L AT 114;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 214L. CPR, AED and First Aid.1 Credit.

Students learn principles of first aid and complete health provider certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator. For PT majors only. (2 lab hrs.)

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

AT 215. Therapeutic Modalities.3 Credits.

Therapeutic Modalities is an introductory course designed to provide students with knowledge of theory and operation of the most commonly used therapeutic devices.

Prerequisites: Take AT 214 AT 216;
Corequisites: Take AT 215L;
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 215L. Therapeutic Modalities Lab.1 Credit.

This lab includes the practical application of therapeutic modalities and must be taken in conjunction with AT 215. (2 lab hrs.)

Corequisites: Take AT 215;
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 216. Emergency Management of Athletic Trauma.2 Credits.

This laboratory and lecture course teaches the basic skills and decision-making processes necessary to manage emergency medical situations common to athletic activity. Students also perform general first aid. All students are required to pass Red Cross CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer and Emergency Oxygen Administration (or equivalent).

Prerequisites: Take BIO 102 AT 115;
Corequisites: Take AT 216L;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 216L. Emergency Management of Athletic Trauma Lab.1 Credit.

This lab includes the practical application of basic skills and decision-making processes necessary to manage emergency medical situations. Must be taken in conjunction with AT 216.

Corequisites: Take AT 216;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 240. Strength Training & Conditioning (AT 481).3 Credits.

This course addresses the scientific and theoretical basis of strength training and conditioning for sports performance. This includes understanding biomechanics, exercise physiology, adaptations to training, exercise technique, prescription and the basic structure of the variables used in the design of strength and conditioning programs. The scientific and theoretical components of this class are reinforced with "hands-on" laboratory experiences.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 211-211L BIO 212-212L;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 250. Introduction to Evaluation and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Injuries.3 Credits.

This lecture and laboratory course provides the student with a basic systematic approach to the process of physical evaluation and therapeutic exercise program development. It includes processes of history taking and physical exam techniques, indications and contraindications of therapeutic interventions, and treatment adjustments as related to patient injury, prevention, reconditioning and return-to-activity guidelines.

Prerequisites: Take AT 114 AT 115 AT 116;
Corequisites: Take AT 250L;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 250L. Introduction to Evaluation and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Injuries.1 Credit.

This lab includes the practical application of recognizing, evaluating and treating common musculoskeletal injuries. Must be taken in conjunction with AT 250.

Corequisites: Take AT 250;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 251. Evaluation and Treatment of Lower Extremity Musculoskeletal Injuries.3 Credits.

This lecture and laboratory course provides the student with a basic evaluation process and techniques involved in assessing musculoskeletal injuries of the lower extremity. The assessment information is then used to design and implement treatment and rehabilitative protocols. Emphasis is placed on integrating kinesiological principals with injury/illness recognition skills and rehabilitative concepts.

Prerequisites: Take AT 250;
Corequisites: Take AT 251L;
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 251L. Evaluation and Treatment of Lower Extremity Musculoskeletal Injuries Lab.1 Credit.

This lab includes the practical application of recognizing, evaluating and treating common musculoskeletal injuries. Must be taken in conjunction with AT 251.

Corequisites: Take AT 251;
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 290. Clinical Practicum I, Risk Management And Injury Prevention.2 Credits.

This practicum introduces students to the general policies and procedures of the Quinnipiac University athletic training room. Students are instructed in taping techniques, proper medical documentation skills, ambulatory aids, the preparticipation examination, and the Quinnipiac University Emergency Action Plan. Hands-on practical experience is emphasized in class sessions.

Prerequisites: Take AT 214 AT 216;
Corequisites: Take AT 290C;
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 290C. Clinical Practicum I.1 Credit.

During the semester, students gain minimum 100 hours of supervised clinical experience. Students are required to complete specific NATA clinical competencies and proficiencies. (3 lab hrs.)

Prerequisites: Take AT 214 AT 216;
Corequisites: Take AT 290;
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 299. AT Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

AT 330. Nutrition for Sport and Fitness.3 Credits.

In this foundational course, students learn nutritional concepts related to wellness, injury prevention and maximizing human performance. Students also explore concepts surrounding eating disorders, nutrition for the injured athlete, and dietary supplements.

Prerequisites: Take AT 290 or HSC 262;
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 350. Evaluation and Treatment of Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Injuries.3 Credits.

Students learn the evaluation process and techniques involved in assessing musculoskeletal injuries of the upper extremity. The assessment information is then used to design and implement treatment and rehabilitative protocols. Emphasis is placed on integrating kinesiological principals with injury/illness recognition skills and rehabilitative concepts.

Corequisites: Take AT 350L;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 350L. Evaluation and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Injuries Lab.1 Credit.

This lab includes the practical application of musculoskeletal injury evaluation and rehabilitation. Must be taken in conjunction with AT 350.

Corequisites: Take AT 350;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 351. General Medical Conditions and Treatment.3 Credits.

This course enables the athletic training student to recognize, evaluate and differentiate common systemic diseases, understand appropriate pharmacological interventions, understand the principles of pharmacology and common issues that arise when specific pharmacological agents are employed. Students who take AT 351 may not also receive credit for HSC 351.

Prerequisites: Take AT 251 AT 216;
Corequisites: Take AT 351L;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 351L. General Medical Conditions and Treatments Lab.1 Credit.

This lab includes the practical application of recognizing, evaluating, differentiating and treating common medical conditions. Must be taken in conjunction with AT 351.

Corequisites: Take AT 351
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 352. Evaluation and Treatment of Spinal Injuries.3 Credits.

Students learn the evaluation process and techniques involved in assessing common spinal pathologies in the orthopedic and sport setting. The assessment information is then used to design and implement treatment and rehabilitative protocols. Emphasis is on the evaluation process, critical thinking, choosing appropriate treatment techniques, as well as indications and contraindications of specific spinal disorders and exercise progression as related to spinal dysfunction/disorders. Manual therapy as a treatment technique and current trends for treating spinal disorders is also covered.

Prerequisites: Take AT 350 AT 351;
Corequisites: Take AT 352L;
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 352L. Evaluation and Treatment of the Spinal Injuries Lab.1 Credit.

This lab includes the practical application of the evaluation process of all musculoskeletal injuries with emphasis on the spine and demonstration of evidence based treatment techniques and must be taken in conjunction with AT 352.

Corequisites: Take AT 352
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 390. Clinical Practicum II, Athletic Protective Equipment.2 Credits.

Students are introduced to proper fitting of athletic equipment, as well as sporting rules relevant to safety and the role of the medical professional. The course includes instruction in fabricating and applying protective equipment, such as pads, splints and supports, and advanced taping and wrapping techniques used in athletic training; hands-on practical experience is emphasized in class sessions.

Prerequisites: Take AT 290;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 390C. Clinical Practicum II, Clinical.1 Credit.

During the semester, students gain a minimum 200 hours of supervised clinical experience. Students are required to complete specific NATA clinical competencies and proficiencies. (3 lab hrs.)

Corequisites: Take AT 390;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 391C. Clinical Practicum III.1 Credit.

During the semester, students gain a minimum of 200 hours of supervised clinical experience. Students are required to complete specific NATA clinical competencies and proficiencies. (3 lab hrs.)

Prerequisites: Take AT 350 AT 351 AT 390C;
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 440. Biomechanics.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the advanced study of human movement, concentrating on the principles of mechanics they relate to the human body. Areas of athletic injury, pathology, sport performance, occupational risks, injury prevention, and rehabilitation are addressed. Projects are designed not only to achieve scientific insights into biomechanical problems but also to train students in state-of-the-art interdisciplinary research procedures. Kinematic and kinetic analyses are conducted.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 211 BIO 212;
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

AT 440L. Biomechanics Lab.1 Credit.

This lab includes the practical application of biomechanics including the processes involved in data collection for forces, EMG and motion analysis data. Must be taken in conjunction with AT 440. (2 lab hrs.)

Corequisites: Take AT 440;
Offered: As needed

AT 450. Administration and Management in Athletic Training.3 Credits.

Organizational and administrative procedures and considerations, as well as the legal aspects of athletic training and sports medicine are included in this course.

Prerequisites: Take AT 391C;
Offered: Every year, Fall
UC: Natural Sciences

AT 460. Advanced Nutrition (HSC 460).3 Credits.

This advanced-level food and nutrition course examines the composition and physiological role of nutrients and their relationships to health and the body. Macronutrient metabolism as well as a detailed examination of the role of vitamin and mineral metabolism are explored. Current nutrition issues of supplement use, weight management, sports nutrition, nutritional ecology and the application of nutrition directly to food and its preparation also are addressed. Students receive hands-on instruction in cooking throughout the semester.

Prerequisites: Take AT 330, NU 351, SCI 105 or SCI 161 or HSC 262;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 481. Strength Training and Conditioning for the Athletic Trainer (AT 240).2 Credits.

The purpose of the course is to expand the students' knowledge of rehabilitation beyond general concepts. Students learn theory pertaining to a variety of conditioning methods including: periodization, plyometrics and functional training. Lifting techniques and injury prevention related to conditioning are discussed and applied to both the individual athlete and team training concepts. The course is taught as a combination of classroom and laboratory experiences to ensure that students are capable of translating theory into practice.

Prerequisites: Take AT 352 or permission of instructor;
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 482. Advanced Rehabilitation Options in Sports Medicine.2 Credits.

This course examines in-depth rehabilitative techniques and advanced manual therapy skills for the sports medicine setting. Practical application of current concepts and research-driven rehabilitative protocols are emphasized. The course also addresses trends in sports medicine surgical procedures, research behind new rehabilitative techniques, and effective mechanisms for evaluating clinical relevance of new products.

Prerequisites: Take AT 352;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 490. AT Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Offered: As needed

AT 490C. Clinical Practicum IV.1 Credit.

During the semester, students gain a minimum of 200 hours of clinical experience. Students are required to complete specific NATA clinical competencies and proficiencies. (3 lab hrs.)

Prerequisites: Take AT 351 AT 391C;
Offered: Every year, Fall

AT 491. Clinical Practicum V, Professional and Career Preparation.2 Credits.

This course provides students with a means to integrate and augment all concepts, skills and knowledge covered in the athletic training curriculum. Much of the course is discussion based and requires the students to be fully participative.

Prerequisites: Take AT 490C;
Corequisites: Take AT 491C;
Offered: Every year, Spring

AT 491C. Clinical Practicum V, Clinical.1 Credit.

During the semester, students gain a minimum of 200 hours of supervised clinical experience. Students are required to complete specific NATA clinical competencies and proficiencies. (3 lab hrs.)

Corequisites: Take AT 491;
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring