Occupational Therapy (OT)

OT 501F. Immersive Fieldwork Experience in Psychosocial and Mental Health Practice (Fieldwork IIa).3 Credits.

This six- to seven-week fieldwork experience provides students with in-depth opportunities to integrate theory, research and best practice in psychosocial and/or mental health settings. The experience promotes clinical reasoning, reflective practice and professionalism while enhancing one's therapeutic use of self. Practice settings may include traditional mental health agencies, community-based programs and nontraditional sites that promote psychological and social factors for occupational engagement and well-being.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OT 501S. Fieldwork Seminar.1 Credit.

This course runs concurrently with the mental health/psychosocial summer experience and is delivered in an online format. It is designed to enhance professional and clinical reasoning while promoting the integration of theory to practice. Students are encouraged to critique the system of care as it relates to best practice for an identified population.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OT 502. Pharmacology in Occupational Therapy Practice.2 Credits.

This course addresses the pharmacokinetics, side effects and drug interactions of medications prescribed to clients who are commonly referred for occupational therapy services. The course emphasizes the role of the occupational therapist in medication management as a health maintenance activity and in monitoring the impact of drug therapy on the therapeutic process and occupational performance of clients.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OT 511. Administration and Management in Occupational Therapy.4 Credits.

This class introduces students to the daily management functions of an occupational therapy department including planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and supervision of occupational therapy assistants and other department personnel. The course integrates students' knowledge of interventions with information related to the delivery of occupational therapy services. Topics include managed care, quality assurance, leadership, regulatory agencies, models of practice, ethics, and consultation. Students gain hands-on experience with budgeting, marketing, program evaluation, and ethical problem-solving in administration.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 522L. Biomechanical Interventions in Occupational Therapy.2 Credits.

This lab provides students with "hands-on" learning experience and clinical reasoning in the safe and effective application of biomechanically-oriented interventions including physical agents and modalities, orthotic fitting and fabrication, and therapeutic exercise. Students also are introduced to prosthetics and the role of occupational therapy during pre-prosthetic and prosthetic training. Students apply clinical reasoning to identify the most appropriate biomechanical interventions based on the client's evaluation and socio-cultural factors to facilitate occupational performance. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 531. Sensory Processing and Integration.3 Credits.

This course provides an in-depth analysis of sensory processing and integration with a focus on clinical reasoning to understand and appreciate the impact of these processes on individuals, populations and community environments. Opportunities are provided to learn specific intervention strategies for individuals, as well a systems approach emphasizing the importance of educating the team of people who support these individuals in varying contexts, to facilitate functional participation and engagement in purposeful and productive activities. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 531F. Sensory Processing and Integration Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This structured fieldwork experience enables students to observe and analyze the impact of Ayres' Sensory Integration intervention. The settings utilized are equipped to provide clinical application of principles learned in the OT curriculum and shall be supervised by qualified personnel who specialize in sensory processing and integration. Prerequisite: Compliance with OT fieldwork requirements through MyRecordTracker.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 531L. Sensory Processing and Integration Lab.1 Credit.

This course provides practical experientials designed to assimilate sensory processing and integration concepts. Evaluation, direct intervention and collaboration strategies in traditional environments are emphasized. Additionally, application of sensory integrative concepts into currently relevant community-based contexts and systems are explored to facilitate functional participation and engagement in purposeful, context-specific activities. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 532. Neurorehabilitation in Occupational Therapy.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of specialized interventions used by occupational therapy practitioners in neurorehabilitation. This course integrates the use of various theoretical models/frames of reference, current evidence and clinical/professional reasoning pertinent to the OT process in neurorehabilitation practice. Key concepts in interprofessional practice and health literacy are incorporated. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 532F. Neurorehabilitation in Occupational Therapy Practice Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This course provides a structured fieldwork in neuro-rehabilitative settings and enables the student to observe, participate in, and document clinical encounters with clients undergoing OT evaluation and/or intervention. Students also have an opportunity to observe and/or engage in inter- and intra-professional collaboration, patient/client education and application of evidence-based practice. Emphasis is on applying theory into practice and the development of professional identity. Prerequisite: Compliance with OT fieldwork requirements per MyRecord Tracker.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 532L. Neurorehabilitation in Occupational Therapy Lab.1 Credit.

This course complements OT 532 Neurorehabilitation in OT Practice in providing a comprehensive overview of specialized interventions used by occupational therapy practitioners in neurorehabilitation. Students have the opportunity to apply methods and techniques according to various theoretical models/frames of reference and current evidence-based interventions. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 540. Special Topics in Occupational Therapy.1.5-3 Credits.

This course provides an opportunity for students to delve deeper into the specialized knowledge of the profession with evidence-based, occupation-centered practice as its core subject. Students further explore the specialized roles of the occupational therapist beyond that of a direct provider of skilled services, such as organizational/community leader, educator, case manager, entrepreneur and consultant at the systems level. In addition, students learn various modes of care delivery and systems of care including but not limited to tele-health, community building/development and train-the-trainer; they also evaluate the outcomes of such modes.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 541. Assistive Technology in Occupational Therapy.2 Credits.

This course provides students with exposure to advanced intervention techniques related to assistive technology in occupational therapy. The course focuses on application of assistive technology across the lifespan, and thus emphasizes use of both interventions in a variety of practice contexts and practice settings. Since technology options change rapidly, emphasis is on the clinical reasoning process used to select and evaluate interventions in rehabilitation, home, work, leisure and community technology-related practice areas. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 541L. Assistive Technology in Occupational Therapy Lab.1 Credit.

This lab course provides students with hands-on experience in advanced intervention techniques related to assistive technology in occupational therapy. The course focuses on application of assistive technology across the lifespan, and thus emphasizes use of both interventions in a variety of practice contexts and practice settings. Since technology options change rapidly, emphasis is on the clinical reasoning process used to select and evaluate interventions in rehabilitation, home, work, leisure and community technology-related practice areas. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 542. Work and Ergonomics.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the occupation of work applied across the lifespan and to various practice contexts and worker challenges. The course addresses topics related to the occupation of work, including employment acquisition, job performance, volunteerism, and retirement. Work tasks and work demands are analyzed relative to physical, cognitive, social, organizational, and environmental factors that impact job performance. Modifications that optimize worker functioning are examined as prevention and as rehabilitation. Prerequisite: Matriculation as an MOT student

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 550. OT Research Methods.4 Credits.

This course addresses the importance of research in the practice of occupational therapy. The course examines the research theories and methods in occupational therapy practice. Students participate in designing and implementing entry-level research studies as well as analyzing and interpreting the professional literature. Students formulate the proposal for their spring capstone project.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 556. Professional Development.3 Credits.

This distance learning course focuses on the current issues related to the roles of the student transitioning to professional. The course emphasizes linking theory to practice, self-analysis and reflection upon academic experience, and relating those to different facets of clinical and professional reasoning as a funding mechanism in practice. Continued professional growth through the development of understanding of personal and professional responsibilities as a practicing therapist and a commitment to lifelong learning and professional advocacy also are addressed. Grant writing is included.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 565. Integrative Case Studies.2 Credits.

This course explores individual, group and population case studies of clients in occupational therapy. Students analyze each case using clinical reasoning, qualitative research strategies, frames of reference and best practices to develop integrative evaluation and intervention skills.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 570. Capstone Graduate Projects.3 Credits.

This capstone course is a culminating experience in the occupational therapy curriculum, which integrates all course-based material and fieldwork experiences with practical application. Students design and execute a research or creative project that is relevant to current and emerging practice areas in occupational therapy. Students gain experience in project management, critical analysis and professional presentations.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 580. Fieldwork Level IIb.6 Credits.

These supervised experiences provide the student with the opportunity to apply theory and clinical reasoning skills to the occupational therapy evaluation and intervention process for clients across the life span and in a variety of life environments. Students must abide by all fieldwork policies as listed in the program manual. Fieldwork is 12 weeks long.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OT 581. Fieldwork Level IIa.6 Credits.

These supervised experiences provide the student with the opportunity to apply theory and clinical reasoning skills to the occupational therapy evaluation and intervention process for clients across the life span and in a variety of life environments. Students must abide by all fieldwork policies as listed in the program manual. Fieldwork is 12 weeks long.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 607. Educational Leadership.3 Credits.

This course is intended to prepare occupational therapy practitioners to assume or enhance their educational leadership roles in a variety of health care and community-based programs. It provides advanced education in the areas of leadership and administration/management, ethics, decision-making and motivation.

Offered: Fall

OT 608. Entrepreneurial Concepts for Occupational Therapy.3 Credits.

This course provides the student with a critical analysis of entrepreneurial concepts in the practice of occupational therapy (business and private practice) including: designing opportunities, completing a needs assessment, defining the market or clientele, developing a business plan, developing a practice plan, billing, measuring effectiveness and growth, marketing and employee management. When possible the student's current practice experience is used for projects.

Offered: Spring

OT 615. Critical Writing I.3 Credits.

This course is the first in a sequence of courses focusing on scholarly reading and writing. Students investigate a specific area of interest, describe best practices as supported by evidence and theory and learn how to conduct a peer review of writing.

Offered: Every year, Spring Online

OT 620. Foundations in Teaching and Learning I.3 Credits.

This course is the first in a series of courses focusing on advanced topics in teaching and learning. Students explore various theoretical frameworks regarding learning and the relationship between learning theory and occupational therapy. Students work to develop the ability to incorporate learning theory into their educational practice.

Offered: Every year, Spring Online

OT 621. Creating Effective Learning Environments and Experiences.3 Credits.

This course is the second course in the series of courses focusing on advanced topics in teaching and learning. Building upon theoretical foundations explored in OT 620 Foundations in Teaching and Learning I, students explore various educational models and tools to enhance teaching and utilize design steps to develop professional, educational presentations.

Prerequisites: Take OT 620.
Offered: Every year, Summer Online

OT 625. Special Topics in School-Based Practice I.3 Credits.

This course is the first in a series of courses focusing on advanced topics in school-based practice. Students critique existing scholarship and professional documents regarding best practices in school-based practice, and identify and critique existing interventions utilized in school-based practice and their efficacy. Topics covered include legislations, assessment, intervention and whole school programming.

Offered: Every year, Spring Online

OT 626. Special Topics in School-Based Practice II.3 Credits.

This course is the second in a series of courses focusing on advanced topics in school-based practice. Students build upon work completed as part of OT 625 Special Topics in School-Based Practice I to develop a model of practice/intervention addressing "best practice" for practitioners working in school-based practice.

Prerequisites: Take OT 625;
Offered: Every year, Summer Online

OT 635. Scholarly Use of Evidence in Writing.3 Credits.

This course is the second in a sequence of courses focusing on scholarly reading and writing. Emphasis on determining proper use of evidence occurs throughout the course. Synthesis of scholarly evidence and literature culminates in the creation of a manuscript for submission to a professional trade magazine or journal.

Prerequisites: Take OT 615.
Offered: Every year, Summer Online

OT 640. Directed Study in Evidence-Based Practice.3 Credits.

Students learn the steps of the evidence-based practice continuum using a journal entry format. Each student follows the steps using actual practice case studies from his/her individual practice sites and presents the responses to each step in the process to discover evidence to guide the practice case questions. Peer interaction and feedback is critical to the realistic development of evidence to guide practice decisions. A major assignment is to have each student participate in the writing of a systematic review or an evidence-based practice brief for the profession. Students complete a needs assessment of a particular site or practice area as well.

Prerequisites: Take OT 654.
Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 650. Application of Theory and Exploration of Occupation.3 Credits.

This course begins by exploring occupation--the central construct of the profession. Students also look at occupational science as a disciplinary knowledge base. Current ideas about occupation-based practice in both traditional settings and emerging practice areas are analyzed. Theories and models of practice that guide occupation-based practice also are reviewed.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 651. Systems.3 Credits.

Knowledge of health care delivery in the U.S. is fundamental to providing occupational therapy services. A key element to providing relevant health care services is an understanding of the broader systems that influence and drive delivery models. This course addresses the general systems model as applied to the delivery of health care services. System components are addressed including the resources, the internal processes, external influences, measureable outcomes and stakeholders in service delivery systems. The course examines the range of service delivery models in OT including the traditional medical model, school-based, community, educational, home health, hospice and telehealth, among others. The course prepares students to analyze the key components of delivery system and determine how OT services are optimized in specific models.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 652. Doctoral Seminar.1 Credit.

Students create a professional development plan and an e-portfolio for doctoral work with goals and objectives related to occupation and evidence-based practice. This plan also relates to the core curriculum and chosen tracks. Students explore advanced evidence-based practice skills required to retrieve evidence. They also learn about the tools utilized by clinicians to enhance practice, how to be a consumer of scholarship, and proper use of evidence/citations.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 653. Policy/Ethics.2 Credits.

The future leaders of the profession need an understanding of the political and legal policies impacting occupational therapy, as well as the ethics involved in decision making. Students explore the role of the occupational therapist in advocacy as well as the concepts of social justice. The impact of these policies and decisions are reviewed in relationship to all settings and the occupational as well as psychosocial well-being of the individual client and populations of clients.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 654. Critical Inquiry of Scholarship.3 Credits.

This course is the first of a series of courses focusing on scholarship in the profession. Emphasis is placed on understanding the various forms of scholarship that are needed to drive the profession of occupational therapy forward and building a solid foundation needed to carry out a scholarly project. This course covers the scholarship process, with a focus on developing a question for scholarly exploration and ways of answering questions. Quantitative, qualitative, mixed method and participatory research methodologies are introduced.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 655. Professional Seminar.3 Credits.

This course integrates prior learning into the discussion of how to become an "agent of change" within the occupational therapy environment. Topics include the analysis of statistics related to occupational therapy, advocacy, leadership, group dynamics, systematic interactions and the ability to manage groups both internal and external to occupational therapy. As discussions progress, students are given the opportunity to participate in a panel discussion regarding these topics and how they relate to future capstone projects.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OT 656. Critical Inquiry of Scholarship II.4 Credits.

This course is the second of a series of courses focusing on scholarship in the profession. Emphasis is placed on developing a proposal for a scholarly project. Drawing on the content of OT 654, students develop the background to the project and problem statement, questions guiding the project informed by theory, a literature review and method section.

Prerequisites: Take OT 640 OT 654.
Offered: Every year, Summer

OT 660. Seminar: Innovations and Emerging Issues in Children and Youth.3 Credits.

The OT seminars OT 660, OT 661 and OT 662 present core content that is the same for all three courses during weeks one and two. The focus of the core weeks is on environmental scanning for evidence of change and locating evidence in the literature for that change. Weeks four through seven focus on the individual theme as selected by each student. The content is faculty facilitated in the thematic areas based on the OTD tracks.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 661. Seminar: Innovations and Emerging Issues in Environmental Adaptations.3 Credits.

The OT seminars OT 660, OT 661 and OT 662 present core content that is the same for all three courses during weeks one and two. The focus of the core weeks is on environmental scanning for evidence of change and locating evidence in the literature for that change. Weeks four through seven focus on the individual theme as selected by each student. The content is faculty facilitated in the thematic areas based on the OTD tracks.

OT 662. Seminar: Innovations and Emerging Issues in the Adult Health Care Continuum.3 Credits.

The OT seminars OT 660, OT 661 and OT 662 present core content that is the same for all three courses during weeks one and two. The focus of the core weeks is on environmental scanning for evidence of change and locating evidence in the literature for that change. Weeks four through seven focus on the individual theme as selected by each student. The content is faculty facilitated in the thematic areas based on the OTD tracks.

OT 670. Leadership in Program Development/Business.3 Credits.

Students analyze leadership styles as they relate to supervision in both public and private sectors. The course includes a review of skills required to be an entrepreneur, own a practice and navigate the policies required of a business.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 671. Leadership in Higher Education.3 Credits.

Students analyze leadership styles as they relate to the educational setting for those interested in academia. The course also includes a discussion of transitions from practice to the educational setting.

OT 672. Leadership in Practice.3 Credits.

Students analyze leadership styles as they relate to supervision of occupational therapy staff as well as the transition from a clinician to a supervisor or administrator.

OT 680. Capstone I.2 Credits.

This capstone course is a culminating experience in the occupational therapy curriculum, which integrates all core and track material. Students design and execute a scholarly or creative project that is relevant to current and emerging practice areas in occupational therapy. Students gain experience in project management, critical analysis and professional presentations.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 681. Capstone II.2 Credits.

This capstone course is a culminating experience in the occupational therapy curriculum, which integrates all core and track material. Students design and execute a scholarly or creative project that is relevant to current and emerging practice areas in occupational therapy. Students gain experience in project management, critical analysis and professional presentations.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 699. OT Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Offered: As needed